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To put it into simple words, I have declared a struct:

typedef struct
{

char* studentID;
char* studentName;
int* studentScores;

}STUDENT;

Then I declared a pointer and allocated memory for the pointer and each element:

STUDENT* studentPtr = NULL;

   if ((studentPtr = (STUDENT*) calloc (5, sizeof(STUDENT))) == NULL)
{
    printf("Not enough memory\n");
    exit(100);
}

{
    if ((studentPtr->studentID = (char*) calloc (20, sizeof(char))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }

    if ((studentPtr->studentName = (char*) calloc (21, sizeof(char))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }
    if ((studentPtr->studentScores = (int*) calloc (5, sizeof(int))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }

After that I want to read in 5 records from the file, but I get an error when I try to run a program because of my incrementation. (it works fine if I had something like "char studentName[20];") How should I increment the pointer to achieve the result that I want? It's required to be in pointer notation.

STUDENT* ptr = studentPtr;

while (*count < MAX_SIZE)
{
    fscanf(spData, "%s %*s %*s %*d %*d %*d %*d %*d", ptr->studentName)
    (*count)++;
    ptr++;
}

File Content:

Julie Adams 1234    52  7   100 78  34

Harry Smith 2134    90  36  90  77  30

Tuan Nguyen 3124    100 45  20  90  70

Jorge Gonzales  4532    11  17  81  32  77

Amanda Trapp    5678    20  12  45  78  34

Just one last question: If I keep the struct as I declared and properly allocated memory for it. How can I free it after I am done with it? Should it be something like this?

for (STUDENT* ptr = studentPtr; ptr < studentPtr + *count; ptr++)
{   //*count is the number of records
    free(ptr->studentID);
    free(ptr->studentName);
    free(ptr->studentScores);
}
  free(studentPtr);
share|improve this question
3  
but I get an error - what error do you get? (I am tempted to link to toomuchcode.org/2008/11/guru-myth.html :-) ) –  Andreas Mar 8 '13 at 9:53
    
Sorry for not being specific. I get "EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code =1, address = 0 x 0) in Xcode. I also tried to run this code in other complier , and it failed too. –  KurodaTsubasa Mar 8 '13 at 9:55
    
can you share data from file. It seems you are missing "\n" or some other characters in format specifier, try reading one by one each entry and you will get to know what you are missing –  Shubhansh Mar 8 '13 at 9:58
1  
If your fields are fixed length, why not use array syntax in the struct? It'll give the same end result, but use less code and memory getting there. –  ams Mar 8 '13 at 10:05
    
Why is count a pointer? Why (*count)++;? –  LihO Mar 8 '13 at 10:05
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you've only allocated memory for the fields in studentPtr[0]. The remaining four entries in the table a still zeroed.

Try this:

int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    if ((studentPtr[i]->studentID = (char*) calloc (20, sizeof(char))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }

    if ((studentPtr[i]->studentName = (char*) calloc (21, sizeof(char))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }
    if ((studentPtr[i]->studentScores = (int*) calloc (5, sizeof(int))) == NULL)
    {
        printf("Not enough memory\n");
        exit(100);
    }
}

In fact, by using dynamically allocated memory for the individual fields, you are making life much harder for yourself. Not only do you need to allocate each field explicitly (and presumably free them later), which costs code and time, you're also incurring the extra memory overhead in the heap tables. This would be necessary if you fields were variable sizes, but they are fixed sized, and therefore a straight-forward array is much more efficient.

So, I'd end up with this:

typedef struct
{
  char studentID[20];
  char studentName[21];
  int studentScores[5];
} STUDENT;

STUDENT studentPtr[5];
share|improve this answer
    
Aw, I didn't realize that I wasn't actually allocating memory for other entries. Thank you very much! I really appreciate your help. It seems that I still need some time to perceive pointers as arrays. Yes, I am aware of the fact that I could simply set the fixed length, but I was required to dynamically allocate memory for each element in struct to practice my memory management skills. Thank you very much again! –  KurodaTsubasa Mar 8 '13 at 10:30
    
To do it properly you should read each string into a large temporary buffer, and then malloc the exact amount of memory you need to hold the string, and finally copy the string to the new memory. –  ams Mar 8 '13 at 10:52
    
One last question. How can I free the struct after I am done with it? Edited the post. –  KurodaTsubasa Mar 9 '13 at 3:36
    
Which one? The struct containing only arrays can be freed in one call. The struct full of malloced pointers must have each malloc freed individually. Basically, you just have some code that does a free for every pointer in your struct. Just make sure you don't free the same thing twice, and that any unallocated pointers are always kept NULL. –  ams Mar 11 '13 at 9:18
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Firstly you are just assigning memory to pointer of structure 5 times than memory of structure.

And again on same lines you are assigning memory to the first structure only from you assigned(5 structures).

You should have to do it 5 times as you have 5 structures like:

for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
//Do assignments to each element in structure not more than required
//as you are doing in your code:
studentPtr[i]->studentScores = (int*) calloc(5,sizeof(int))
//so your assignment of memory should be:
studentPtr[i]->studentScores = (int*) calloc(sizeof(int))
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't cast the result of calloc(), doing so is 100% pointless and can hide bugs if the program is compiled with a C90 compiler. –  Lundin Mar 8 '13 at 10:46
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