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The problem:

Find pieces of text in a file enclosed by @ and replace the inside

Input:

@abc@ abc @ABC@
cba @cba CBA@

Deisred output:

абц abc АБЦ
cba цба ЦБА

I have the following:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Encode;
my $output;
open FILE,"<", 'test.txt';
while (<FILE>) {
    chomp(my @chars = split(//, $_));
    for (@chars) {
        my @char;
        $_ =~ s/a/chr(0x430)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/b/chr(0x431)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/c/chr(0x446)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/d/chr(0x434)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/e/chr(0x435)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/A/chr(0x410)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/B/chr(0x411)/eg;
        $_ =~ s/C/chr(0x426)/eg;
        push @char, $_;
        $output = join "", @char;
        print encode("utf-8",$output);}
print "\n";
}
close FILE;

But I'm stuck on how to process further

Thanks for help in advance!

Kluther

share|improve this question
    
so, you have text. If word marked with @, you need to spell it on your language? –  gaussblurinc Mar 8 '13 at 11:11
    
well not entirely. If a piece of text (could be 1 word, could be more than one word or can be an entire line) is enclosed by "@" than the enclosed text should be processed to cyrillic. –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 11:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

With minimal changes to your algorithm you need to keep track of whether you are inside the @marks or not. so add something like this

my $bConvert = 0;
chomp(my @chars = split(//, $_));
for (@chars) {
    my $char = $_;
    if (/@/) {
        $bConvert = ($bConvert + 1) % 2;
        next;
    }
    elsif ($bConvert) {
        $char =~ s/a/chr(0x430)/eg;
        $char =~ s/b/chr(0x431)/eg;
        $char =~ s/c/chr(0x446)/eg;
        $char =~ s/d/chr(0x434)/eg;
        $char =~ s/e/chr(0x435)/eg;
        $char =~ s/A/chr(0x410)/eg;
        $char =~ s/B/chr(0x411)/eg;
        $char =~ s/C/chr(0x426)/eg;
    }
    print encode("utf-8",$char);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm it seems, thank you –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 11:32
    
One question. How do I exclude an email-address from processing? –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 13:41

Here my solution. (you will fixed it, yes. It is prototype)

for (my $data = <DATA>){
    $data=~s/[@]([\s\w]+)[@]/func($1)/ge;
    print $data;
#   while($data=~m/[@]([\s\w]+)[@]/g){
#      print "marked: ",$1,"\n";
#      print "position:", pos();
#   }
#      print "not marked: ";
}
sub func{
   #do your magic here ;)
   return "<< @_ >>";
}
__DATA__
@abc@ abc @ABC@ cba @cba CBA@

What happens here?

First, I read data. You can do it yourself.

for (my $data = <DATA>){...}

Next, I need to search your pattern and replace it.
What should I do?

Use substition operator: s/pattern/replace/

But in interesting form:

s/pattern/func($1)/ge

Key g mean Global Search

Key e mean Evaluate

So, I think, that you need to write your own func function ;)

Maybe better to use transliteration operator: tr/listOfSymbolsToBeReplaced/listOfSymbolsThatBePlacedInstead/

share|improve this answer

Try this after $output is processed.

$output =~ s/\@//g;
my @split_output = split(//, $output);
$output = "";
my $len = scalar(@split_output) ;
while ($len--) {
    $output .= shift(@split_output);
}
print $output;
share|improve this answer
    
I have adjusted the code to this:`chomp(my @chars = split(//, $_)); for (@chars) {my @char;$_ =~ s/a/chr(0x430)/eg;etc....; push @char, $_; $output = join "", @char; $output =~ s/\@//g; my @split_output = split(//, $output); $output = ""; my $len = scalar(@split_output) ; while ($len--) { $output .= shift(@split_output); } print encode("utf-8",$output);} –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 11:33
    
@Kluther This will give you the final output what you've named as Desired output:. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Mar 8 '13 at 12:08

It can be done with a single regex and no splitting of the string:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Encode;

my %chars = (
    a => chr(0x430),
    b => chr(0x431),
    c => chr(0x446),
    d => chr(0x434),
    e => chr(0x435),
    A => chr(0x410),
    B => chr(0x411),
    C => chr(0x426),
);

my $regex = '(' . join ('|', keys %chars) . ')'; 


while (<DATA>) {
    1 while ($_ =~ s|\@(?!\s)[^@]*?\K$regex(?=[^@]*(?!\s)\@)|$chars{$1}|eg);
    print encode("utf-8",$_);
}

It does require repeated runs of the regex due to the overlapping nature of the matches.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks OK but leafs the @ in the file –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 11:56
    
@Kluther, oh, missed that. You could add a second line s/\@//g; after the first one. –  dan1111 Mar 8 '13 at 12:41
    
thanks a lot dan1111 –  Kluther Mar 8 '13 at 13:29

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