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Currently we are doing this by looping through each value of list and dictionary:

private DataTable ChangeToDictionary(List<Dictionary<string,int>> list)
       {
           DataTable datatTableReturn = new DataTable();

           if (list.Count() > 0)
           {
               Dictionary<string, int> haeders = list.ElementAt(0);
               foreach (var colHead in haeders)
               {
                   datatTableReturn.Columns.Add(colHead.Key);
               }
           }

           foreach (var row in list)
           {
               DataRow dataRow = datatTableReturn.NewRow();
               foreach (var col in row)
               {

                   dataRow[col.Key] = col.Value;
               }
               datatTableReturn.Rows.Add(dataRow);
           }
           return datatTableReturn;

       }

But is there a better way? Looping through so many times doesn't feel good

share|improve this question
    
Like what? Any other approach would eventually need to go over all your data c.q. loop over the records. I don't see the real problem that you are having. You dislike the above code? –  Bazzz Mar 8 '13 at 12:11
    
This works, but as said is there a better ,robust way –  Simsons Mar 8 '13 at 12:12
3  
Why convert to a DataTable in the first place? –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 12:14
    
@Jodrell, Because DataTable can is not there in Seilverlight and sometimes not serializable while returning from service –  Simsons Mar 8 '13 at 12:16
    
but, if the thing that needs the DataTable worked with an IEnumerable<IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, int>> for instance ... –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 12:20

5 Answers 5

The answers above don't address the issue of the dictionary having more than 1 row. This solution addresses the issue.

static DataTable ToDataTable(List<Dictionary<string, int>> list)
{
    DataTable result = new DataTable();
    if (list.Count == 0)
        return result;

    var columnNames = list.SelectMany(dict=>dict.Keys).Distinct();
    result.Columns.AddRange(columnNames.Select(c=>new DataColumn(c)).ToArray());
    foreach (Dictionary<string,int> item in list)
    {
        var row = result.NewRow();
        foreach (var key in item.Keys)
        {
            row[key] = item[key];
        }

        result.Rows.Add(row);
    }

    return result;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Dictionary<string, int>> it = new List<Dictionary<string, int>>();
    Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();
    dict.Add("a", 1);
    dict.Add("b", 2);
    dict.Add("c", 3);
    it.Add(dict);
    dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();
    dict.Add("bob", 34);
    dict.Add("tom", 37);
    it.Add(dict);
    dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();
    dict.Add("Yip Yip", 8);
    dict.Add("Yap Yap", 9);
    it.Add(dict);

    DataTable table = ToDictionary(it);
    foreach (DataColumn col in table.Columns)
        Console.Write("{0}\t", col.ColumnName);
    Console.WriteLine();
    foreach (DataRow row in table.Rows)
    {
        foreach (DataColumn column in table.Columns)
            Console.Write("{0}\t", row[column].ToString());
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
    Console.ReadLine();

}

And the output looks like...

a       b       c       bob     tom     Yip Yip Yap Yap
1       2       3
                        34      37
                                        8       9
share|improve this answer
    
your output doesn't match your input. –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 15:36
1  
(facepalm) oops. you are right. I accidentally used the wrong iterator. Edited with correction. –  John Kraft Mar 8 '13 at 17:10
    
This was a time-saver. Kudos! –  Dragos Bobolea Jul 11 '13 at 14:25
    
to populate the dataTable's Columns you cloud also use: foreach (KeyValuePair<string,string> entry in myDictonary) { myTable.Columns.Add(entry.Key); } –  philx_x Jan 19 at 16:29

Speed, elegance and reusability don't go together. You always choose more important one, and try to balance other two.

Faster the code, uglier it is. Prettier it is, less reusable it is.

Here's an example of "elegant" solution, but that goes with it not being very readable.

private static DataTable ToDictionary(List<Dictionary<string, int>> list)
{
    DataTable result = new DataTable();
    if (list.Count == 0)
        return result;

    result.Columns.AddRange(
        list.First().Select(r => new DataColumn(r.Key)).ToArray()
    );

    list.ForEach(r => result.Rows.Add(r.Select(c => c.Value).Cast<object>().ToArray()));

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you iterate the first row twice. –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 12:53
    
and int is already an object –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 12:54
    
There is no fixed relationship between performance and readability. Fast code can be readable code. Ugliness is purely subjective. –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 17:15
    
Maybe I should have said "simpler". You can't say that implementation of quick sort is simpler than implementation of bubble sort. –  Nikola Radosavljević Mar 8 '13 at 23:13

Try this:

    private DataTable GetDataTableFromDictionaries<T>(List<Dictionary<string, T>> list)
    {
        DataTable dataTable = new DataTable();

        if (list == null || !list.Any()) return dataTable;

        foreach (var column in list.First().Select(c => new DataColumn(c.Key, typeof(T))))
        {
            dataTable.Columns.Add(column);
        }

        foreach (var row in list.Select(
            r =>
                {
                    var dataRow = dataTable.NewRow();
                    r.ToList().ForEach(c => dataRow.SetField(c.Key, c.Value));
                    return dataRow;
                }))
        {
            dataTable.Rows.Add(row);
        }

        return dataTable;
    }
share|improve this answer

How about something like the code below?

Good, because it iterates each row exactly once. It should be pretty quick, I've included obvious exceptions to make the code safer.

private static DataTable DictionariesToDataTable<T>(
        IEnumerable<IDictionary<string, T>> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        return null;
    }

    var result = new DataTable();
    using (var e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (!e.MoveNext())
        {
            return result;
        }

        if (e.Current.Keys.Length == 0)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }

        var length = e.Current.Keys.Length;

        result.Columns.AddRange(
            e.Current.Keys.Select(k => new DataColumn(k, typeof(T))).ToArray());

        do
        {
            if (e.Current.Values.Length != length)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }

            result.Rows.Add(e.Current.Values);
        }
        while (e.MoveNext());

        return result;
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
You're not disposing the enumerator. –  Romoku Mar 8 '13 at 15:01
    
@Romoku, true, fixed it. –  Jodrell Mar 8 '13 at 15:31

try my solution, seems very clean to me:

private DataTable DictonarysToDataTable(List<Dictionary<string, int>> list) 
    {
        DataTable table = new DataTable();

        foreach (Dictionary<string,string> dict in list)        //for every dictonary in the list ..
        {
            foreach (KeyValuePair<string,int> entry in dict) //for every entry in every dict
            {
                if (!myTable.Columns.Contains(entry.Key.ToString()))//if it doesn't exist yet
                {
                    myTable.Columns.Add(entry.Key);                 //add all it's keys as columns to the table
                }
            }
            table.Rows.Add(dict.Values.ToArray());              //add the the Values of every dict in the list as a new row
        }

        return table;
    }

Edit: Oh Snap, this works only for one Dictionary .. i didn't think it through. But maybie you can modify it to work for a List of Dictionarys ..

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