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I've looked for int.TryParse method implementation, how it works actually, but I haven't found. I have to know, about a string, whether it's a numeric value, but I don't want to convert it at the this time. So I need only the bool result from tryparse. So the questions are:

1, Is there any function wich can provide only the bool result, and

2, I'd like to know, how the tryparse actually works (is there a try catch inside or iterates through the characters of input string)?

Thanks for the answers!

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1. No, there isn't. You could use Convert.ToInt32(), but it will throw an exception, if the string cannot be parsed. 2. It will have to iterate through the string, but it probably won't catch any exception, since it's faster than catching the exception from Convert.ToInt32() –  Nolonar Mar 8 '13 at 13:20
    
You could use regex ^\d+$. Or evaluate each char for IsDigit. –  Blam Mar 8 '13 at 13:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 19 down vote accepted

If you only need the bool result, just use the return value and ignore the out parameter.

bool successfullyParsed = int.TryParse(str, out ignoreMe);
if (successfullyParsed){
    // ...
}

Edit: Meanwhile you can also have a look at the original source code:

http://referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/int32.cs


If i want to know how something is actually implemented, i'm using ILSpy to decompile the .NET-code.

This is the result:

// int
/// <summary>Converts the string representation of a number to its 32-bit signed integer equivalent. A return value indicates whether the operation succeeded.</summary>
/// <returns>true if s was converted successfully; otherwise, false.</returns>
/// <param name="s">A string containing a number to convert. </param>
/// <param name="result">When this method returns, contains the 32-bit signed integer value equivalent to the number contained in s, if the conversion succeeded, or zero if the conversion failed. The conversion fails if the s parameter is null, is not of the correct format, or represents a number less than <see cref="F:System.Int32.MinValue"></see> or greater than <see cref="F:System.Int32.MaxValue"></see>. This parameter is passed uninitialized. </param>
/// <filterpriority>1</filterpriority>
public static bool TryParse(string s, out int result)
{
    return Number.TryParseInt32(s, NumberStyles.Integer, NumberFormatInfo.CurrentInfo, out result);
}


// System.Number
internal unsafe static bool TryParseInt32(string s, NumberStyles style, NumberFormatInfo info, out int result)
{
    byte* stackBuffer = stackalloc byte[1 * 114 / 1];
    Number.NumberBuffer numberBuffer = new Number.NumberBuffer(stackBuffer);
    result = 0;
    if (!Number.TryStringToNumber(s, style, ref numberBuffer, info, false))
    {
        return false;
    }
    if ((style & NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier) != NumberStyles.None)
    {
        if (!Number.HexNumberToInt32(ref numberBuffer, ref result))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if (!Number.NumberToInt32(ref numberBuffer, ref result))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

And no, i cannot see any Try-Catchs on the road:

// System.Number
private unsafe static bool TryStringToNumber(string str, NumberStyles options, ref Number.NumberBuffer number, NumberFormatInfo numfmt, bool parseDecimal)
{
    if (str == null)
    {
        return false;
    }
    fixed (char* ptr = str)
    {
        char* ptr2 = ptr;
        if (!Number.ParseNumber(ref ptr2, options, ref number, numfmt, parseDecimal) || ((ptr2 - ptr / 2) / 2 < str.Length && !Number.TrailingZeros(str, (ptr2 - ptr / 2) / 2)))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// System.Number
private unsafe static bool ParseNumber(ref char* str, NumberStyles options, ref Number.NumberBuffer number, NumberFormatInfo numfmt, bool parseDecimal)
{
    number.scale = 0;
    number.sign = false;
    string text = null;
    string text2 = null;
    string str2 = null;
    string str3 = null;
    bool flag = false;
    string str4;
    string str5;
    if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowCurrencySymbol) != NumberStyles.None)
    {
        text = numfmt.CurrencySymbol;
        if (numfmt.ansiCurrencySymbol != null)
        {
            text2 = numfmt.ansiCurrencySymbol;
        }
        str2 = numfmt.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        str3 = numfmt.NumberGroupSeparator;
        str4 = numfmt.CurrencyDecimalSeparator;
        str5 = numfmt.CurrencyGroupSeparator;
        flag = true;
    }
    else
    {
        str4 = numfmt.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        str5 = numfmt.NumberGroupSeparator;
    }
    int num = 0;
    char* ptr = str;
    char c = *ptr;
    while (true)
    {
        if (!Number.IsWhite(c) || (options & NumberStyles.AllowLeadingWhite) == NumberStyles.None || ((num & 1) != 0 && ((num & 1) == 0 || ((num & 32) == 0 && numfmt.numberNegativePattern != 2))))
        {
            bool flag2;
            char* ptr2;
            if ((flag2 = ((options & NumberStyles.AllowLeadingSign) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 1) == 0)) && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
            {
                num |= 1;
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
            else
            {
                if (flag2 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                {
                    num |= 1;
                    number.sign = true;
                    ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (c == '(' && (options & NumberStyles.AllowParentheses) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 1) == 0)
                    {
                        num |= 3;
                        number.sign = true;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if ((text == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text)) == null) && (text2 == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text2)) == null))
                        {
                            break;
                        }
                        num |= 32;
                        text = null;
                        text2 = null;
                        ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
    }
    int num2 = 0;
    int num3 = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        if ((c >= '0' && c <= '9') || ((options & NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier) != NumberStyles.None && ((c >= 'a' && c <= 'f') || (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F'))))
        {
            num |= 4;
            if (c != '0' || (num & 8) != 0)
            {
                if (num2 < 50)
                {
                    number.digits[(IntPtr)(num2++)] = c;
                    if (c != '0' || parseDecimal)
                    {
                        num3 = num2;
                    }
                }
                if ((num & 16) == 0)
                {
                    number.scale++;
                }
                num |= 8;
            }
            else
            {
                if ((num & 16) != 0)
                {
                    number.scale--;
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            char* ptr2;
            if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 16) == 0 && ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str4)) != null || (flag && (num & 32) == 0 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str2)) != null)))
            {
                num |= 16;
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
            else
            {
                if ((options & NumberStyles.AllowThousands) == NumberStyles.None || (num & 4) == 0 || (num & 16) != 0 || ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str5)) == null && (!flag || (num & 32) != 0 || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, str3)) == null)))
                {
                    break;
                }
                ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
            }
        }
        c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
    }
    bool flag3 = false;
    number.precision = num3;
    number.digits[(IntPtr)num3] = '\0';
    if ((num & 4) != 0)
    {
        if ((c == 'E' || c == 'e') && (options & NumberStyles.AllowExponent) != NumberStyles.None)
        {
            char* ptr3 = ptr;
            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
            char* ptr2;
            if ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
            {
                c = *(ptr = ptr2);
            }
            else
            {
                if ((ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                {
                    c = *(ptr = ptr2);
                    flag3 = true;
                }
            }
            if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
            {
                int num4 = 0;
                do
                {
                    num4 = num4 * 10 + (int)(c - '0');
                    c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
                    if (num4 > 1000)
                    {
                        num4 = 9999;
                        while (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                        {
                            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
                        }
                    }
                }
                while (c >= '0' && c <= '9');
                if (flag3)
                {
                    num4 = -num4;
                }
                number.scale += num4;
            }
            else
            {
                ptr = ptr3;
                c = *ptr;
            }
        }
        while (true)
        {
            if (!Number.IsWhite(c) || (options & NumberStyles.AllowTrailingWhite) == NumberStyles.None)
            {
                bool flag2;
                char* ptr2;
                if ((flag2 = ((options & NumberStyles.AllowTrailingSign) != NumberStyles.None && (num & 1) == 0)) && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.positiveSign)) != null)
                {
                    num |= 1;
                    ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (flag2 && (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, numfmt.negativeSign)) != null)
                    {
                        num |= 1;
                        number.sign = true;
                        ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (c == ')' && (num & 2) != 0)
                        {
                            num &= -3;
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            if ((text == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text)) == null) && (text2 == null || (ptr2 = Number.MatchChars(ptr, text2)) == null))
                            {
                                break;
                            }
                            text = null;
                            text2 = null;
                            ptr = ptr2 - (IntPtr)2 / 2;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            c = *(ptr += (IntPtr)2 / 2);
        }
        if ((num & 2) == 0)
        {
            if ((num & 8) == 0)
            {
                if (!parseDecimal)
                {
                    number.scale = 0;
                }
                if ((num & 16) == 0)
                {
                    number.sign = false;
                }
            }
            str = ptr;
            return true;
        }
    }
    str = ptr;
    return false;
}
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1 * 114 / 1!!! I had better results with dotPeek –  spender Mar 8 '13 at 13:25
1  
It's more complex then I thaught :) Thank you! –  speti43 Mar 8 '13 at 13:26
    
ILSpy looks good, I'll use it! –  speti43 Mar 8 '13 at 13:40

Just because int.TryParse gives you the value doesn't mean you need to keep it; you can quite happily do this:

int temp;
if (int.TryParse(inputString, out temp))
{
    //do stuff
}

You can ignore temp entirely if you don't need it. If you do need it, then hey, it's waiting for you when you want it.

As for the internals, as far as I remember it attempts to read the raw bytes of the string as an int and tests whether the result is valid, or something; it's not as simple as iterating through looking for non-numeric characters.

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Regex is compiled so for speed create it once and reuse it.
The new takes longer than the IsMatch.
This only checks for all digits.
It does not check for range.
If you need to test range then TryParse is the way to go.

private static Regex regexInt = new Regex("^\\d+$");
static bool CheckReg(string value)
{
    return regexInt.IsMatch(value);
}
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Check this simple program to understand int.TryParse

 class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            string str = "7788";
            int num1;
            bool n = int.TryParse(str, out num1);
            Console.WriteLine(num1);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

Output is : 7788

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