Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a program which is using Bresenham's line algorithm to scan pixels in a line. This is reading pixels rather than writing them, and in my particular case, reading them is costly.

I can however determine that some spans of pixels do not need to be read. It looks something like this:

Normal scan of all pixels:

*start
 \
  \
   \
    \
     \
      *end

Scan without reading all pixels:

*start
 \
  \
        - At this point I know I can skip (for example) the next 100 pixels
          in the loop. Crucially, I can't know this until I reach the gap.
     \
      *end

The gap in the middle is much quicker because I can just iterate over the pixels without reading them.

However, can I modify the loop in any way to just jump directly forward 100 pixels within the loop, calculating directly the required values 100 steps ahead in the line algorithm?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Bresenhams middlepoint algorithm calculates 'distance' of point from a theoretical line going from (ax,ay)->(bx,by) by summing up digital differences delta_x = (by-ay), delta_y = (ax-bx).

Thus, if one want's to skip 7 pixels, one has to add accum += 7*delta_x; then dividing by delta_y one can check how many pixels should have been moved in y-direction and taking a remainder accum = accum % delta_y one should be able to continue at proper position.

The nice thing is that the algorithm is originated from the necessity of avoiding a division...

Disclaimer: whatever told may need to be adjusted by half delta.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your main loop looks essentially something like:

  while (cnt > 0) // cnt is 1 + the biggest of abs(x2-x1) and abs(y2-y1)
  {
    ReadOrWritePixel(x, y);

    k += n; // n is the smallest of abs(x2-x1) and abs(y2-y1)
    if (k < m) // m is the biggest of abs(x2-x1) and abs(y2-y1)
    {
      // continuing a horizontal/vertical segment
      x += dx2; // dx2 = sgn(x2-x1) or 0
      y += dy2; // dy2 = sgn(y2-y1) or 0
    }
    else
    {
      // beginning a new horizontal/vertical segment
      k -= m;
      x += dx1; // dx1 = sgn(x2-x1)
      y += dy1; // dy1 = sgn(y2-y1)
    }

    cnt--;
  }

So, skipping some q pixels is equivalent to the following adjustments (unless I made a mistake somewhere):

  • cntnew = cntold - q
  • knew = (kold + n * q) % m
  • xnew = xold + ((kold + n * q) / m) * dx1 + (q - ((kold + n * q) / m)) * dx2
  • ynew = yold + ((kold + n * q) / m) * dy1 + (q - ((kold + n * q) / m)) * dy2

Note that / and % are integer division and modulo operators.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.