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I have a massive tab delimited file like this:

contig04733 contig00012 77
contig00546 contig01344 12
contig08943 contig00001 14
contig00765 contig03125 88
etc

And I have a separate tab delimited file with only a subset of these contig pairs like this:

contig04733 contig00012
contig08943 contig00001
etc

I want to extract into a new file the lines in the first file that correspond with the ones listed in the second. In this particular dataset I think which way round each pair should be the same in both files. But would also like to know if say:

file1 contig08943 contig00001 14

but in file2 its

contig00001 contig08943

and I still want that combination, is it possible to script something for this too?

My code is below.

use strict;
use warnings;

#open the contig pairs list
open (PAIRS, "$ARGV[0]") or die "Error opening the input file with contig pairs";

#hash to store contig IDs - I think?!
my $pairs;

#read through the pairs list and read into memory?
while(<PAIRS>){
    chomp $_; #get rid of ending whitepace
    $pairs->{$_} = 1;
}
close(PAIRS);

#open data file
open(DATA, "$ARGV[1]") or die "Error opening the sequence pairs file\n";
while(<DATA>){
    chomp $_;
    my ($contigs, $identity) = split("\t", $_);
    if (defined $pairs->{$contigs}) {
        print STDOUT "$_\n";
    }
}
close(DATA);
share|improve this question
    
Also if possible, I would like to convert the 3rd column in the first file - dividing the number by 100 and then square rooting it. eg. the first line of the new file in this example would be contig04733 contig00012 0.877 –  Amy Ellison Mar 8 '13 at 14:18
1  
Show us your code. What have you tried? –  Greg Bacon Mar 8 '13 at 14:50
    
@GregBacon - trying this: use strict; use warnings; #open the contig pairs list open (PAIRS, "$ARGV[0]") or die "Error opening the input file with contig pairs"; #hash to store contig IDs - I think?! my $pairs; #read through the pairs list and read into memory? while(<PAIRS>){ chomp $_; #get rid of ending whitepace $pairs->{$_} = 1; } close(PAIRS); #open data file open(DATA, "$ARGV[1]") or die "Error opening the sequence pairs file\n"; while(<DATA>){ chomp $_; my ($contigs, $identity) = split("\t", $_); if (defined $pairs->{$contigs}) { print STDOUT "$_\n"; } } close(DATA); –  Amy Ellison Mar 8 '13 at 15:52
    
@GregBacon but this requires me removing gap/tab between first two columns and then separating them again I think....sorry I'm completely new to perl so just trying to stitch together examples from web! –  Amy Ellison Mar 8 '13 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Piece together the code below without the running commentary to get a working program. We start off with typical front matter that instructs perl to give you helpful warnings if you make common mistakes.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

Showing the user when necessary how to properly invoke your program is always a nice touch.

die "Usage: $0 master subset\n" unless @ARGV == 2;

With read_subset, the program reads the second file named on the command line. Because your question states that you do not care about the order, e.g., that

contig00001    contig08943

is equivalent to

contig08943    contig00001

the code increments both $subset{$p1}{$p2} and $subset{$p2}{$p1}.

sub read_subset {
  my($path) = @_;

  my %subset;
  open my $fh, "<", $path or die "$0: open $path: $!";
  while (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    my($p1,$p2) = split /\t/;
    ++$subset{$p1}{$p2};
    ++$subset{$p2}{$p1};
  }

  %subset;
}

Using a hash to mark occurrences that your program has observed is highly frequent in Perl programs. In fact, many of the examples in the Perl FAQ use hashes named %seen, as in “I have seen this.”

By removing the second command-line argument with pop, that leaves only the master file which lets the program easily read all lines of input using while (<>) { ... }. With %subset populated, the code splits each line into fields and skips any line not marked seen. Everything that passes this filter is printed on the standard output.

my %subset = read_subset pop @ARGV;
while (<>) {
  my($f1,$f2) = split /\t/;
  next unless $subset{$f1}{$f2};
  print;
}

For example:

$ cat file1
contig04733     contig00012     77
contig00546     contig01344     12
contig08943     contig00001     14
contig00765     contig03125     88

$ cat file2
contig04733     contig00012
contig00001     contig08943

$ perl extract-subset file1 file2
contig04733     contig00012     77
contig08943     contig00001     14

To create a new output that contains the selected subset, redirect the standard output as in

$ perl extract-subset file1 file2 >my-subset
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much - especially for breaking it down so I can learn from it! –  Amy Ellison Mar 8 '13 at 17:28

Try this one using a hash of hashes based on the two keys (after a split)

use strict;
use warnings;

#open the contig pairs list
open (PAIRS, "$ARGV[0]") or die "Error opening the input file with contig pairs";

#hash to store contig IDs - I think?!
#my $pairs;

#read through the pairs list and read into memory?
my %all_configs;
while(<PAIRS>){
    chomp $_; #get rid of ending whitepace
    my @parts = split("\t", $_); #split into ['contig04733', 'contig00012', 77]
    #store the entire row as a hash of hashes
    $all_configs{$parts[0]}{$parts[1]} = $_;
    #$pairs->{$_} = 1; 
}
close(PAIRS);

#open data file
open(DATA, "$ARGV[1]") or die "Error opening the sequence pairs file\n";
while(<DATA>){
    chomp $_;
    my ($contigs, $identity) = split("\t", $_);
    #see if we find a row, one way, or the other
    my $found_row = $all_configs{$contigs}{$identity} 
        || $all_configs{$identity}{$contigs};
    #if found, the split, and handle each part    
    if ($found_row) {
        my @parts = split("\t", $found_row);
        #same sequence as in first file
        my $modified_row  = $parts[0]."\t".$parts[1].(sqrt($parts[2]/100));
        #if you want to keep the same sequence as found in second file
        my $modified_row  = $contigs."\t".$identity.(sqrt($parts[2]/100));

        print STDOUT $found_row."\n"; #or
        print STDOUT $modified_row."\n";
    }
}
close(DATA);
share|improve this answer

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