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To cut a long story short: I find the Java antipatterns an indispensable resource. For beginners as much as for professionals. I have yet to find something like this for C#. So I'll open up this question as community wiki and invite everyone to share their knowledge on this. As I am new to C#, I am strongly interested in this, but cannot start with some antipatterns :/

Here are the answers which I find specifically true for C# and not other languages.

I just copy/pasted these! Consider throwing a look on the comments on these as well.


Throwing NullReferenceException

Throwing the wrong exception:

if (FooLicenceKeyHolder == null)
    throw new NullReferenceException();

Properties vs. public Variables

Public variables in classes (use a property instead).

Unless the class is a simple Data Transfer Object.


Not understanding that bool is a real type, not just a convention

if (myBooleanVariable == true)
{
    ...
}

or, even better

if (myBooleanVariable != false)
{
    ...
}

Constructs like these are often used by C and C++ developers where the idea of a boolean value was just a convention (0 == false, anything else is true); this is not necessary (or desirable) in C# or other languages that have real booleans.


Using using()

Not making use of using where appropriate:

object variable;
variable.close(); //Old code, use IDisposable if available.
variable.Dispose(); //Same as close.  Avoid if possible use the using() { } pattern.
variable = null; //1. in release optimised away.  2. C# is GC so this doesn't do what was intended anyway.
share

locked by Bill the Lizard Jun 28 '12 at 12:15

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

2  
Well... this was exactly what I tried to avoid. The question linked as "duplicate" contains many common OO "bad practices". I've been developing for more than 10 years now and these are not new to me. What I expected in this case, were specific C# anti-patterns. – exhuma Oct 7 '09 at 7:55
3  
The Java "antipatterns" you link to are not antipatterns (e.g ineffective and/or counterproductive design patterns), but bad coding practices, like most of the answers to your question. Like design patterns, antipatterns are language agnostic. – comichael Oct 12 '09 at 4:48
    
good point. If you consider "Design Patterns" there are those that are language agnostic, but then, some make more sense in a language than others. Others may be irrelevant for a given language, if the language itself offers a solution to the given problem. So I assume, that you could also find Antipatterns which are more relevant to C# than other languages. Reading the same good/bad practices over-and-over again is getting boring ;) – exhuma Oct 15 '09 at 12:12
    
Dispose does not always include Close by the way. It does in most .net classes and it's common sense, but it's nowhere explicitly implied. – Michael Stum Dec 23 '09 at 6:05

38 Answers 38

Rethrowing the exception incorrectly. To rethrow an exception :

try
{
    // do some stuff here
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw ex;  // INCORRECT
    throw;     // CORRECT
    throw new Exception("There was an error"); // INCORRECT
    throw new Exception("There was an error", ex); // CORRECT
}
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7  
True, dont ever hide the stack trace... – Adriaan Stander Oct 7 '09 at 5:34
31  
catch (Exception ex) is an anti-pattern in itself. – Joren Oct 7 '09 at 6:27
    
Unless you're doing some logging or similar and then re-throwing it – thecoop Oct 8 '09 at 13:18
18  
@Joren, catch (Exception ex) without throw is an anti-pattern ... there are lot's of valid cases to catch the general exception type if you throw back (like, logging, throwing a new exception type, doing a rollback on some resources, etc.). But of course the rules vary for applications, libraries, plugins etc. – Pop Catalin Oct 8 '09 at 14:09
5  
throw new Exception("There was an error") might be perfectly valid if you want to hide the original error (e.g. a library), perhaps security-related. – erikkallen Oct 10 '09 at 12:04

GC.Collect() to collect instead of trusting the garbage collector.

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12  
And failing to wait for pending finalizers to complete, in the rare situations where you do want to force a collection. – Eric Lippert Oct 7 '09 at 15:16
    
Not really. I had situations were i got an reproducable OutOfMemoryException that was gone after calling GC.Collect() now and then. GC seems to be broken. – Rauhotz Oct 7 '09 at 20:25
    
broken vs non deterministic. If you release a whole lot of references and suddenly need it again, then this is probably a candidate for calling it manually. – Spence Oct 7 '09 at 20:35
4  
You can get an OutOfMemoryException for having fragmented references or for requesting more memory then you have on your system. Do you, by any chance, have your page file size fixed? I mean if you think you can write a better garbage collector than Microsoft I say go for it and then get them to buy it from you. – Matthew Whited Oct 8 '09 at 13:10
6  
There are valid use cases for GC.Collect(), but almost none in typical applications. You need a special use for .Net to call GC.Collect() (like a Game engine, after loading a level, so the GC won't start in the middle of the level doing a full collect, collecting previous level allocated objects) or near real time applications, where GC behaviour needs to be somewhat controlled and predictable, or server applications when you know you will run idle for a certain period and use that opportunity to collect. – Pop Catalin Oct 8 '09 at 14:16

I see this one way too much, both in Java and C#...

if(something == true){
  somethingelse = true;
}

with bonus points if it also has

else{
  somethingelse = false;
}
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4  
Without the bonus it's not that painful (only the "== true") – ripper234 Oct 7 '09 at 6:16
12  
if (someCondition) return true; else return false; AAAARRRGGGG!!!! – Ed S. Oct 7 '09 at 6:16
9  
With the first case, consider the case of something = false and somethingelse = true. You shouldn't refactor to somethingelse = something – vanja. Oct 7 '09 at 6:20
    
I agree with rupper234. It could actually improve readability in some cases. – Egor Pavlikhin Oct 7 '09 at 6:23
8  
@vanya: Of course not. That's somethingelse |= something. – Tordek Oct 7 '09 at 6:31
using Microsoft.SharePoint;

'nuff said

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I like this one :) – Ladislav Mrnka Aug 23 '10 at 13:26
    
:) Perfect :) I agree 100% – Dimitar Dimitrov Feb 15 '12 at 8:48

I see following code a lot:

if (i==3)
       return true;
else
       return false;

should be:

       return (i==3);
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2  
Oh man I see that a lot... +1. – karlgrz Oct 8 '09 at 15:16
    
Yeah I see that all the time. I always refactor it if I have the time. – rein Oct 8 '09 at 15:34
29  
return is not a function. The parentheses are unnecessary. – P Daddy Oct 8 '09 at 20:55
11  
@PDaddy: that is true, but the parentheses aid readability. – DisgruntledGoat Oct 12 '09 at 18:39
7  
@DisgruntledGoat: They look like noise to me. – P Daddy Nov 6 '09 at 2:01

Insulting the law of Demeter:

a.PropertyA.PropertyC.PropertyB.PropertyE.PropertyA = 
     b.PropertyC.PropertyE.PropertyA;
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+1, but sadly in some cases (especially with static classes) it can seem hard to get away from... For instance, recently I wrote this: this.Left = Screen.AllScreens[target].Bounds.X – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:33
    
@matthew: it is not so much the left hand side that bothers me. The assignment/mutation is the problem. Call you tell what you are modifying? – leppie Oct 7 '09 at 5:39
    
I'm setting the left side of my form to the left edge of a target screen. In reality, Screen.AllScreens is aliased to a local variable because I didn't want to type full qualification everywhere, but that only shortens what I'm typing, not changing the intent. – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:43

Throwing NullReferenceException:

if (FooLicenceKeyHolder == null)
    throw new NullReferenceException();
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13  
ArgumentNullException ? – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:39
2  
Yes, that would be the correct one to throw :) – leppie Oct 7 '09 at 5:42
2  
Also, I think the general antipattern would be manually throwing any exception that the runtime itself throws when something bad happens – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:46
    
Yes, but this one is particularly misleading because that is not really what happened. – Ed S. Oct 7 '09 at 6:15
5  
I doubt that ArgumentNullException is the way to go in this case since from the code, it does not seem that this.FooLicenseHolder is an argument of a function (at least is does not LOOK like one conventions-wise). Perhaps rephrasing the code a bit would make your (perfectly valid) point little clearer. – petr k. Oct 7 '09 at 20:22

This is true I seen it with my own eyes.

public object GetNull()
{
     return null;
}

It was actually used in the app, and even had a stored procedure to go with it too, an sp_GetNull that would return null....

that made my day.

I think the sp was used for a classic asp site .. something to do with a result set. the .net one was someone idea of "converting" the code into .net...

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2  
maybe the coder assumed that null was a private variable ;O) – Simon D. Oct 7 '09 at 21:24
2  
Well, you encapsulate the concept of nullity inside a function :P – Daniel Daranas Oct 8 '09 at 14:22
7  
They must have thought null might change in the future :) – PeteT Feb 5 '10 at 10:20
int foo = 100;
int bar = int.Parse(foo.ToString());

Or the more general case:

object foo = 100;
int bar = int.Parse(foo.ToString());
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9  
This... what? Why? -headdesk- You can't possibly tell me that someone did this? – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:25
    
I have actually refactored quite a lot of this out of our codebase O_o – Andrew Barrett Oct 7 '09 at 5:27
    
@matthew: added a more general case (aka from the datatable, hehe) – leppie Oct 7 '09 at 5:29
2  
I kid you not, I've seen people doing this for ints, one of many WTF moments I had. – Andrew Barrett Oct 7 '09 at 5:33
24  
You're right, they really should be using TryParse(). :P – rein Oct 7 '09 at 5:35

I have found this in our project and almost broke the chair...

DateTime date = new DateTime(DateTime.Today.Year, 
                             DateTime.Today.Month, 
                             DateTime.Today.Day);
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7  
For the record, the correct usage is: DateTime date = DateTime.Now; – Wedge Oct 7 '09 at 5:40
8  
or DateTime date = DateTime.ToDay; – Adriaan Stander Oct 7 '09 at 5:43
12  
Actually, the correct usage is: DateTime date = DateTime.Now.Date; (or Today.Date) If you omit the Date you will get the time also. – Meta-Knight Oct 7 '09 at 20:26
6  
And I don't really see a big problem with this code, maybe the coder just didn't know about the Date property... -1 – Meta-Knight Oct 7 '09 at 20:26
3  
Um, Correct usage is Datetime date = Datetime.Now.Date – Spence Oct 7 '09 at 20:37

Quite often I stumble over this kind of var-abuse:

var ok = Bar();

or even better:

var i = AnyThing();

Using var that way makes no sense and gains nothing. It just makes the code harder to follow.

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8  
I agree - var seems to be getting very overused recently. – Paddy Oct 7 '09 at 20:39
27  
I don't see an antipattern here, the var removes redundant type definition, as Bar() or AnyThing() will always return the same type. If you will ever change the return type of Bar() or AnyThing(), e.g. use an interface instead of the implementation, you will not need to change ok and i if they only require the interface, which is nice. – Simon D. Oct 7 '09 at 21:08
11  
It's bad because you are not able to spot the type instantly without knowing the Bar() and AnyThing() methods. In my opinion Readability is more important than saving a few redundant characters. Apart from this, var is very usefull for statements like this: var i = new MyTypeWithVeryLongName(); The difference is that you can recognice the type instantly. – Christian Schwarz Oct 8 '09 at 6:28
8  
var something = new Something() is fine. You know what type the object will be. Even better is when var is combined with generic methods to reduce duplication (follows DRY rule). – Finglas Oct 8 '09 at 8:35
8  
Unfortunately ReSharper seems to enjoy suggesting any variable declaration should use var.. – Andrew Koester Oct 8 '09 at 13:32
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+1 for deep nesting. – rein Oct 7 '09 at 6:03
    
Would be useful to split these into separate answers that can be voted up/down independently. – Bevan Oct 7 '09 at 6:08
1  
public event EventHandler MyEvent = delegate { }; <-- no null check needed anymore. – Ed S. Oct 7 '09 at 6:21
    
Also, you can omit braces for the uppermost using blocks, so not too bad to have a few in there. – Ed S. Oct 7 '09 at 6:21
2  
@Ed Swangren: A call through a delegate is much more expensive than an if test, and if somebody does hook up to it, then it becomes a multicast delegate, which is much more expensive than a call through a unicast delegate. See the comments in response to this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/9033/hidden-features-of-c/9282#9282 – P Daddy Oct 9 '09 at 12:48

Not understanding that bool is a real type, not just a convention

if (myBooleanVariable == true)
{
    ...
}

or, even better

if (myBooleanVariable != false)
{
    ...
}

Constructs like these are often used by C and C++ developers where the idea of a boolean value was just a convention (0 == false, anything else is true); this is not necessary (or desirable) in C# or other languages that have real booleans.

Updated: Rephrased the last paragraph to improve its clarity.

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3  
In C and C++ (I've not heard of the C/C++ language, yet), that is not a convention, and it's actually wrong. Since "everything else" is true, doing if(a == true), for some definition of true (say, 1), will not work as intended if a is, say, 4. Likewise, in both cases, if(myBooleanVar) and if(!myBooleanVar) would be a better replacement. – Tordek Oct 7 '09 at 6:36
    
Great comment - good to go into detail. I'm curious though, based on your comments, why do so C++ developers who move to C# insist on always writing comparisons with true and false? (I've worked with several, and all of them have insisted on this practice, citing C++ as the reason). – Bevan Oct 7 '09 at 18:31
1  
if (myBool == true) can make sense, if myBool is a nullable boolean. – Rauhotz Oct 7 '09 at 20:19
1  
Is this really an anti-pattern or just a irritating redundancy? – Jeff Sternal Oct 7 '09 at 20:41
    
@Rauhotz - good point, an edge case I hadn't thought of. – Bevan Oct 7 '09 at 22:10

Public variables in classes (use a property instead).

Unless the class is a simple Data Transfer Object.

See comments below for discussion and clarification.

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5  
The "Unless" above should trigger a warning bell - maybe this isn't so clear-cut after all? – d91-jal Oct 7 '09 at 8:24
2  
Does it hurt for simple DTOs to use properties instead of public variables? I would say not anymore since auto-properties exist. But since I found out that WPF data bindings don't work with public fields (in contrast to public properties) made me forget about ever declaring public fields/variables without accessors again. – Simon D. Oct 7 '09 at 21:01
    
Just use properties. The JITer will try to inline them for you making them the same as the field instead of method calls. – Matthew Whited Oct 8 '09 at 13:13
    
The condition I would put on the "unless" is if the class does not and never will have any invariants it needs to enforce. – peterchen Oct 8 '09 at 13:19
1  
@Robert Frazer: .Net 3.5+ Inlining of value types (C# structs). (X86) blogs.msdn.com/b/vancem/archive/2008/05/12/… – Matthew Whited May 25 '10 at 11:03

I have actually seen this.

bool isAvailable = CheckIfAvailable();
if (isAvailable.Equals(true))
{ 
   //Do Something
}

beats the isAvailable == true anti-pattern hands down!
Making this a super-anti-pattern!

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Wow! Just Wow! I've seen string.Equals used before for strings instead of ==, but that was much more understandable - the guy in question didn't know the == operator was overloaded. But what you've shown takes the cake! – Phil Dec 22 '09 at 22:01
object variable;
variable.close(); //Old code, use IDisposable if available.
variable.Dispose(); //Same as close.  Avoid if possible use the using() { } pattern.
variable = null; //1. in release optimised away.  2. C# is GC so this doesn't do what was intended anyway.
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1  
@Spence: .Close() isn't necessarily 'old code'. Some classes provide a Close() method as an alias to Dispose() where close makes more sense semantically. – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:28
    
True. But forcing IDisposable allows you to use static analysis tools to spot when types implementing IDisposable wasn't used. Additionally all APIs that microsoft had access to implemented IDisposable to allow for the using() pattern. Basically they standardised the pattern making it easier to spot mistakes. .Close() api's are usually throwbacks to the non .Net APIs that this code calls to. – Spence Oct 7 '09 at 5:31
    
Just to clarify, to spot when IDisposable objects were not disposed. – Spence Oct 7 '09 at 5:32
    
Just to add: Setting Disposed objects to null makes sense at least for WinForms controls to prevent a memory leak: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/netfxcompact/thread/… – Michael Stum Oct 7 '09 at 6:36
2  
You had me scared then. This is a bug in the .Net compact framework, not in win forms. Weak reference works in the real .net CLR and I also stand by the fact that the call to null will be optimised away in release mode (which was one of the main motivations for the dispose pattern, which is a method call forcing the lifetime of the object to last at least that long). But .Net CF is definately an interesting beast. – Spence Oct 7 '09 at 8:47

Private auto-implemented properties:

private Boolean MenuExtended { get; set; }
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7  
Auto-implemented property might be converted later into a full-blown property with custom getter and setter methods.. You can't easily do this to a field. – Gart Oct 7 '09 at 5:49
5  
You can, but not in a binary compatible way... but then again, they are private anyway, so they will be binary compatible since the field/property isn't exposed. – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:51
3  
For one, some controls only reflect properties, not fields. The PropertyGrid for example. Sometimes you need to use properties when dealing with reflection, even if those properties are private. – rein Oct 7 '09 at 6:09
3  
@ed: Good luck binding to a private property! – leppie Oct 7 '09 at 7:08
5  
Binary compatibility and data-binding are reasons you might need to use public properties, but those don't apply here. There are several advantages to properties. You can put a debug breakpoint on access. You can easily change their read/write access level. And they can often be useful in refactoring, migrate null checks paired with default values into the property itself, for example. Given the tiny difference in effort needed to create auto-implemented properties, I'd say it's a wash whether properties or fields are the better default. – Wedge Oct 7 '09 at 10:07

Declaring and initializing all local variables at the top of each method is so ugly!

void Foo()
{
    string message;
    int i, j, x, y;
    DateTime date;

    // Code
}
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3  
That's how I was taught to code in college ;) Don't do it anymore though, it's a pain. – Ed Woodcock Oct 8 '09 at 14:03
    
This made sense way back before IDEs. – Dean J Oct 8 '09 at 14:18
12  
Isn't this more of a subjective opinion than a C# anti pattern? – Patrik Oct 8 '09 at 15:56
3  
What's wrong with this? If you're coding your methods properly, they're short enough to see all your variables anyways. I would submit that the variables should be defined at the top of their block, rather than method, unless they must be for scope issues. – snicker Oct 8 '09 at 21:42
1  
It basically trickles from C programming in my opinion because you need to declare all variable before any function call. – K Singh Jan 22 '10 at 7:48

Two string anti patterns
Anti-Pattern # 1
Checking strings for null or empty

//Bad
if( myString == null || myString == "" )
OR
if( myString == null || myString.Length == 0 )

//Good
string.IsNullOrEmpty(myString)

Anti-Pattern # 2 (only for .NET 4.0)
Checking strings for null or empty or white space

//Bad
if( myString == null || myString == "" || myString.Trim() == "")

//Good
string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(myString) 
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Needless casting (please trust the compiler):

foreach (UserControl view in workspace.SmartParts)
{
  UserControl userControl = (UserControl)view;
  views.Add(userControl);
}
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What the crap is going on there? You get a UserControl , assign a new reference to it with a needless cast and then add it to itself? Why? – Ed S. Oct 7 '09 at 6:19
    
@ed: I wish I knew why, but found lurking some time ago in our codebase :) – leppie Oct 7 '09 at 19:31
2  
@ed: it's not added to itself. views != view. ;) – exhuma Oct 8 '09 at 7:20
    
I guess Resharper would see what you did there. – comichael Oct 12 '09 at 4:35
if(data != null)
{
  variable = data;
}
else
{
  variable = new Data();
}

can be better written as

variable = (data != null) ? data : new Data();

and even better written as

variable = data ?? new Data();

Last code listing works in .NET 2.0 and above

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Err...I think your first example should be (data != null) or reverse the if / else part of the ternary block. – Chris Shouts Oct 28 '09 at 15:41
    
good catch, correcting... – Binoj Antony Dec 23 '09 at 6:03
1  
I like this one, thanks – Paul Talbot Jun 2 '10 at 9:01

Speaking with an accent always caught me.

C++ programmers:

if (1 == variable) { }

In C# this will give you a compiler error if you were to type if (1 = variable), allowing you to write the code the way you mean it instead of worrying about shooting yourself in the foot.

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I wouldn't generalize that to C++ programmers...sure, the ones that do it are probably from C or C++, but most programmers think it's annoying to read and don't do it. – GManNickG Oct 7 '09 at 5:39
2  
and yet is the safe thing to do. If you make a typo (= instead of ==) you end up with "1 = variable" and the compiler will call you up on it. – vanja. Oct 7 '09 at 6:24
5  
The safe thing to do is learn to program and type ==, not reverse things... – GManNickG Oct 7 '09 at 11:48
8  
C# makes this convention unnecessary. This code: Int32 x = 5; if (x = 5) { } results in Error 74: Cannot implicitly convert type 'int' to 'bool' Changing "=" to "==" works fine. – JeffK Oct 7 '09 at 21:12
2  
@spence making = return the assigned value allows for the pattern: while((line=r.ReadLine()) != null){//do stuff to line} – Esben Skov Pedersen Oct 9 '09 at 13:30

Not using ternary's is something I see converts to c# do occasionally

you see:

private string foo = string.Empty;
if(someCondition)
  foo = "fapfapfap";
else
  foo = "squishsquishsquish";

instead of:

private string foo  = someCondition ? "fapfapfap" : "squishsquishsquish";
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I was one of the converts and did this a few times - thank got for Resharper saving my ass :) +1 – Andrew Oct 8 '09 at 20:46
7  
I've met quite a few people who were adamantly opposed to EVER using ternary conditionals, saying that it makes for "unreadable code". Fools. – snicker Oct 8 '09 at 21:51
2  
I am as well cautious about ternary statements. Sometimes I prefer them sometimes not. Is there a good reason (language-wise) to always use them in C#? – exhuma Oct 9 '09 at 8:15
    
@exhuma: You shouldn't always use anything, but ?: can make the intent of the code clearer. An 'if/else` block not only takes up more space (making your eyes scan several lines to determine intent), but also makes the decision logic the primary focus, whereas the ternary operator allows the assignment (or argument selection) to be the primary focus. I find this less distracting. Personally, I only use it when it fits comfortably on one line. Exception: combined ternary operations, properly formatted on several, can sometimes be more readable than multiple ifs, or even a switch. – P Daddy Oct 9 '09 at 12:34
2  
If there is only one "thing" in each of the conditionals, then the ternary operator is great. But calling functions (especially with multiple parameters), concatenating strings, etc makes for bad readability. – DisgruntledGoat Oct 12 '09 at 18:55

Accessing modified closures

foreach (string list in lists)
{
        Button btn = new Button();
        btn.Click += new EventHandler(delegate { MessageBox.Show(list); });
}

(see link for explanation and fix)

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For concating arbitrary number of strings using string concatenation instead of string builder

Exampls

foreach (string anItem in list)
    message = message + anItem;
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Or at least use String.Join here. – Adam Luter Oct 8 '09 at 17:19
3  
the perf gain often isn't worth the effort of StringBuilder – Scott Weinstein Oct 9 '09 at 13:24
1  
This looks like a job for string.Concat(). – P Daddy Oct 12 '09 at 0:27

is this considered general ?

public static main(string [] args)
{
  quit = false;
  do
  {
  try
  {
      // application runs here .. 
      quit = true;
  }catch { }
  }while(quit == false);
}

I dont know how to explain it, but its like someone catching an exception and retrying the code over and over hoping it works later. Like if a IOException occurs, they just try over and over until it works..

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1  
This is probably a literal translation of VB6 "On Error Resume Next" – Benjol Oct 7 '09 at 5:36
    
There are sometimes valid reasons for this pattern, but it usually indicates a design flaw. – Wedge Oct 7 '09 at 5:41
1  
Not quite, a literal translation of that 'pragma'(?) would be a try/catch around every line and silently throwing away Exception. – Matthew Scharley Oct 7 '09 at 5:45
1  
In some cases, for example, network connections, if you get disconnected you may want to auto-reconnect. This requires catching the i/o exceptions, then starting your loop over again. Maybe your internet connection went down, which means it will try again and again until it's back up. This is more common in sevices IMO. – Erik Funkenbusch Oct 8 '09 at 5:49
    
It's perfectly valid, if you want an infinite wait instead of a clear exception message in case of bug. – Daniel Daranas Oct 8 '09 at 14:25

The project I'm on had fifty classes, all inheriting from the same class, that all defined:

public void FormatZipCode(String zipCode) { ... }

Either put it in the parent class, or a utility class off to the side. Argh.

Have you considered browsing through The Daily WTF?

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Actually, The Daily WTF is one of my favourite reads ;) – exhuma Oct 9 '09 at 8:12

Massively over-complicated 'Page_Load' methods, which want to do everything.

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C# has page load? Maybe you meant ASP? – D3vtr0n Oct 7 '09 at 20:18
    
protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { // do stuff } – Ralph Lavelle Oct 8 '09 at 1:04
    
Devtron, C# is also a language of ASP.NET, which has a page load method – CRice Oct 8 '09 at 1:08
4  
Yes but it's not an antipattern of the language (C#) it's an antipattern of ASP.NET... – Meta-Knight Oct 8 '09 at 13:12
    
Yep, that's true alright – Ralph Lavelle Oct 9 '09 at 0:16

Using properties for anything other than to simply retrieve a value or possibly an inexpensive calculation. If you are accessing a database from your property, you should change it to a method call. Developers expect that method calls might be costly, they don't expect this from properties.

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1  
I don't think developers (especially new ones) intuitively expect that properties should be fast. I think they expect it if they've been told to expect it. Maybe that's just me though. – Greg Oct 8 '09 at 13:58
    
@Greg: I disagree. A property looks like a variable access (especially to new developers). int a = foo.Metric; looks fast. – P Daddy Oct 8 '09 at 20:58
1  
I don't agree and the LINQ-TO-SQL framework doesn't either since it exposes an entire database through properties – Esben Skov Pedersen Oct 9 '09 at 13:31

Found this a few times in a system I inherited...

if(condition){
  some=code;
}
else
{
  //do nothing
}

and vice versa

if(condition){
  //do nothing
}
else
{
  some=code;
}
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I have accidentally done this when I wanted to return to that block and put in the other clause BUT I now mark it with //TODO: so I can find that tag. I've never just left that blank intentionally, that seems to be a case of being "out in space" while working. – IanStallings Oct 8 '09 at 21:00
    
//TODO: is brilliant :) – Andrew Oct 8 '09 at 21:12
    
but i've seen it commented implying nothing is required and it made me giggle at the time :) – Andrew Oct 8 '09 at 21:12
    
Those are the best. Right up there with empty catch blocks. – IanStallings Oct 8 '09 at 21:40
5  
It shows clearly that the author thought about the case when the expression evaluates to one of the values and actively decided that there's nothing to do. I think this actually helps readability if used correctly. – erikkallen Oct 10 '09 at 12:13

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