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To cut a long story short: I find the Java antipatterns an indispensable resource. For beginners as much as for professionals. I have yet to find something like this for C#. So I'll open up this question as community wiki and invite everyone to share their knowledge on this. As I am new to C#, I am strongly interested in this, but cannot start with some antipatterns :/

Here are the answers which I find specifically true for C# and not other languages.

I just copy/pasted these! Consider throwing a look on the comments on these as well.


Throwing NullReferenceException

Throwing the wrong exception:

if (FooLicenceKeyHolder == null)
    throw new NullReferenceException();

Properties vs. public Variables

Public variables in classes (use a property instead).

Unless the class is a simple Data Transfer Object.


Not understanding that bool is a real type, not just a convention

if (myBooleanVariable == true)
{
    ...
}

or, even better

if (myBooleanVariable != false)
{
    ...
}

Constructs like these are often used by C and C++ developers where the idea of a boolean value was just a convention (0 == false, anything else is true); this is not necessary (or desirable) in C# or other languages that have real booleans.


Using using()

Not making use of using where appropriate:

object variable;
variable.close(); //Old code, use IDisposable if available.
variable.Dispose(); //Same as close.  Avoid if possible use the using() { } pattern.
variable = null; //1. in release optimised away.  2. C# is GC so this doesn't do what was intended anyway.
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locked by Bill the Lizard Jun 28 '12 at 12:15

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2  
Well... this was exactly what I tried to avoid. The question linked as "duplicate" contains many common OO "bad practices". I've been developing for more than 10 years now and these are not new to me. What I expected in this case, were specific C# anti-patterns. –  exhuma Oct 7 '09 at 7:55
3  
The Java "antipatterns" you link to are not antipatterns (e.g ineffective and/or counterproductive design patterns), but bad coding practices, like most of the answers to your question. Like design patterns, antipatterns are language agnostic. –  comichael Oct 12 '09 at 4:48

38 Answers 38

I've had this one before:

AnEnum e = AnEnum.Abc;
int i = (int)e;
// lots of code
AnEnum f = (AnEnum)Enum.Parse(i, typeof(AnEnum));
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if (state == ((int)RowState.Active).ToString())
else if (state == ((int)RowState.NotActive).ToString())

state is a string post value that contain a value from the enum RowState.

Ultimately this is the way we use to check against the value.

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The main issue with .NET seems to be the fact that there are many developers coming from VB 6.0 or (even worse in my opinion, because they mistakenly BELIEVE that they know what to do while VB 6.0 programmers are at least humble enough to be willing to learn something new) Java / C++.

People too ignorant towards modern paradigms, people plastering their code with ugly P/Invoke in the worst C++ - style possible. :-(

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1  
I agree to some degree. But the problem is not always the willingness to learn. My case is similar, due to a corporate decision I have to code in C# now. And a quick 5-day crash-course is supposed to be enough. I don't believe it is. And I am convinced that I will write bad code at first. Which is why I opened this question. To avoid at least some bad code :) –  exhuma Jun 2 '10 at 8:53

Ignorance is bliss (know your framework):

TimeSpan keyDays = new TimeSpan(Licence.LicenceExpiryDate.Ticks);
TimeSpan nowDays = new TimeSpan(System.DateTime.Now.Ticks);

int daysLeft = keyDays.Days - nowDays.Days;
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3  
Sure, this is rather verbose and partly redundant. Could have been int daysLeft = DateTime.Now.Subtract(Licence.LicenceExpiryDate).Days; But verbosity IMHO is not antipattern, performance and readability should not suffer too much, here. –  Simon D. Oct 7 '09 at 21:37
4  
Stupidity is an anti-pattern :) –  leppie Oct 8 '09 at 5:12

When coding a property, just automatically giving it a getter and setter without thinking about its use. Often the get or set is not used and the property should be read (get) only or write (set) only.

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I just saw a few lately.

Never Ending Param Chain

public string CreateJob(string siteNumber, string customer, string jobType, string description, string reference, string externalDoc, string enteredBy, DateTime enteredDateTime)
    {
        //recordtype = 0 for job
        //load assignments and phases set to false
        return Create(0, siteNumber, customer, jobType, description, reference, externalDoc, enteredBy, enteredDateTime, false, false);
    }

public string Create(int recordType, string siteNumber, string customer, string jobType, string description, string reference, string externalDoc, string enteredBy, DateTime enteredDateTime, bool loadAssignments, bool loadPhases)
{
    _vmdh.Fields.FieldByName("WDDOCTYPE").SetValue(recordType, false);
    _vmdh.Fields.FieldByName("NMDOCID").SetValue(-1, false);
    _vmdh.Init();           
        ....
        ...
        // And it keeps going
    }

Wonder what happens at form close

 private void frmAddImages_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
    if (DialogResult != DialogResult.OK)
    {
        if (IsDirty)
        {
            e.Cancel = !(MessageBox.Show("Are you sure that you want to exit without saving", "Form Not Saved", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes);
        }
    }
    }

Stringly Typed

switch (cbDateFilter.Text)
            {
                case "This Week":
                    dt = DateTime.Now;
                    while (dt.DayOfWeek != DayOfWeek.Monday) dt = dt.AddDays(-1); //find first day of week
                    dtFrom.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 00:00:00"));
                    dtTo.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.AddDays(6).ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 23:59:59"));
                    break;

                case "This Month":
                    dt = DateTime.Now;
                    while (dt.Day != 1) dt = dt.AddDays(-1); // find first day of month
                    dtFrom.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 00:00:00"));
                    dtTo.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.AddMonths(1).AddDays(-1).ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 23:59:59"));
                    break;

                case "This Quarter":
                    // if at end of Quarter then we need subtract -4 to get to priv Quarter
                    dt = DateTime.Now;
                    while (dt.Month != 7 &&
                        dt.Month != 10 &&
                        dt.Month != 1 &&
                        dt.Month != 4) dt = dt.AddMonths(-1); //find first month, fiscal year
                    while (dt.Day != 1) dt = dt.AddDays(-1); // find first day on month
                    dtFrom.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 00:00:00"));
                    dtTo.Value = DateTime.Parse(dt.AddMonths(3).AddDays(-1).ToString("dd/MM/yyyy 23:59:59"));
                    break;
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Using (bad)

IEnumerable<Bar> foo = ...
if (foo.Count() > 0)
{
    ...
}

instead of (good)

IEnumerable<Bar> foo = ...
if (foo.Any())
{
    ...
}

to test whether an IEnumerable contains anything. Count() has to enumerate through the entire collection with MoveNext(), while Any() only has to call MoveNext() once.

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Overuse/abuse of object initializers for everything, probably because of laziness:

var person = new Person
{
    FirstName = "joe",
    (... lots of setters down here)
};

without realizing that this is almost as bad as making all the fields public. You should always take care into creating some valid constructors, that initialize your objects to a valid state.

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5  
IMHO, it's not a good design to create constructors with many parameters just to initialize your class. You should provide simple constructors and additional properties. Constructors (also applies to methods) with more than 3 parameters have a really bad smell. –  Christian Schwarz Oct 7 '09 at 6:22
1  
I agree with both of your comments, but @Christian: if those are the required things to set for the object to be in a valid state, then IMO you should make a ctor that requires all of them. Of course, there may be overloads accepting fewer parameters, that initialize the object with some sensible defaults via the : this(...) syntax. And yes, if the ctor takes more than 3 arguments I agree with you that it's starting to smell –  mookid8000 Oct 7 '09 at 13:20
1  
This code is much more readable than if it was turned into a constructor. –  Egor Pavlikhin Oct 8 '09 at 16:05

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