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Just wondering what's the difference between:

$("#some_div").click(customFunction);

and

$("#some_div").click(function() { customFunction(); });

...

function customFunction() {

    console.dir(this);

}
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In the second you have defined two functions one anonymous and other customFunction and in first you have one only anonymous function.

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2  
And the value of this is different. – jantimon Mar 8 '13 at 15:10

Probably no difference. Except in the first option you have only one function declared.

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In practice it probably won’t make a difference (if it currently works both ways).

In theory, however, there is a big difference.

  1. All event handlers get an event argument. In your first case, this is passed to customFunction, in the second, it’s not. That means the first parameter’s value will be undefined.
  2. jQuery calls event handlers with the event’s target as this. The this in the customFunction execution of your second case, however, will point to window.
  3. You can change the value of the customFunction variable between the time the event handler is attached and the time it is executed. If you do that, your first case would execute the old function, the second, however, would “respect” the new value of customFunction and execute that.

In general, the second case is more flexible (but also carries the overhead of an additional nested function call). If you really need the added flexibility (see point #3) without sacrifices (points #1 and #2), use the following construct:

$("#some_div").click(function() { customFunction.apply(this, arguments); });

This will use both the original arguments as well as the this (of the outer function) for the inner function (customFunction) call but will still allow you to have swapped out the implementation of customFunction by the time the event handler is executed.

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