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I can't for the life of me see why I can not read the postPrioity outside the while loop. I tried "export postPrioity="500"" still didn't work.

Any ideas?

-- or in plan text --

#!/bin/bash
cat "/files.txt" | while read namesInFile; do	
			postPrioity="500"
			#This one shows the "$postPrioity" varible, as '500'
			echo "weeeeeeeeee ---> $postPrioity <--- 1"
done
			#This one comes up with "" as the $postPrioity varible. GRRR
			echo "weeeeeeeeee ---> $postPrioity <--- 2"

OUTPUT: (I only have 3 file names in files.txt)

weeeeeeeeee ---> 500 <--- 1
weeeeeeeeee ---> 500 <--- 1
weeeeeeeeee ---> 500 <--- 1
weeeeeeeeee --->  <--- 2
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The pipe operator creates a subshell, see BashPitfalls and BashFAQ. Solution: Don't use cat, it's useless anyway.

#!/bin/bash
postPriority=0
while read namesInFile
do   
    postPrioity=500
    echo "weeeeeeeeee ---> $postPrioity <--- 1"
done < /files.txt
echo "weeeeeeeeee ---> $postPrioity <--- 2"
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Thanks for confirming my guess! I think some of the other workarounds mentioned at BashFAQ (e.g. command grouping) are better bets, though - often your pipeline isn't meaningless. –  Jefromi Oct 7 '09 at 6:12
1  
Of course pipelines aren't meaningless in every case, but the construct “cat file | …” should in most cases be replaced by “… < file”. see e.g. the Bash Guide: mywiki.wooledge.org/… –  Philipp Oct 7 '09 at 6:18
    
Never knew this, thou I knew a little about subshell's. But yeah ill keep this in mind now, and will have a read on those sites, thanks. –  Mint Oct 7 '09 at 6:24
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As a complement to Philipp's response, in case you MUST use a pipe (and as he pointed out, in your example you don't need cat), you can put all the logic in the same side of the pipe:


command | {
  while read line; do
    variable=value
  done
  # Here $variable exists
  echo $variable
}
# Here it doesn't

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I never thought about this before, but I'm guessing that the pipe/loop creates a child process shell, which naturally can't affect the environment of its parent. This is really unfortunate, because I really like the pipe/loop construct.

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Alternatively use process substitution:

while read line
do    
    variable=value  
done < <(command)
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