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I have some HTML menus, which I show completely when a user clicks on the head of these menus. I would like to hide these elements when the user clicks outside the menus' area.

Is something like this possible with jQuery?

$("#menuscontainer").clickOutsideThisElement(function() {
    // hide the menus
});
share|improve this question
23  
Here's a sample of this strategy: jsfiddle.net/tedp/aL7Xe/1 – Ted Nov 9 '11 at 17:02
6  
As Tom mentioned, you'll want to read css-tricks.com/dangers-stopping-event-propagation before using this approach. That jsfiddle tool is pretty cool though. – Jon Coombs Jan 2 '15 at 21:08
    
get a reference to the element and then event.target, and finally != or == both of them then execute code accordingly.. – Rohit Kumar Jul 7 '15 at 19:43
    
Please change the answer to one that actually works. Clearly this accepted answer has a lot of downvotes – Ian Steffy Nov 13 '15 at 16:32

59 Answers 59

up vote 1263 down vote accepted

Attach a click event to the document body which closes the window. Attach a separate click event to the window which stops propagation to the document body.

$(window).click(function() {
//Hide the menus if visible
});

$('#menucontainer').click(function(event){
    event.stopPropagation();
});
share|improve this answer
355  
This breaks standard behaviour of many things, including buttons and links, contained within #menucontainer. I am surprised this answer is so popular. – Art Jun 12 '10 at 8:00
53  
This doesn't break behavior of anything inside #menucontainer, since it is at the bottom of the propagation chain for anything inside of it. – Eran Galperin Jun 16 '10 at 19:55
67  
its very beautyfull but you should use $('html').click() not body. The body always has the height of its content. It there is not a lot of content or the screen is very high, it only works on the part filled by the body. – meo Feb 25 '11 at 15:35
56  
I am also surprised that this solution got so many votes. This will fail for any element outside that has stopPropagation jsfiddle.net/Flandre/vaNFw/3 – Andre May 8 '12 at 12:32
65  
Philip Walton explains very well why this answer isn't the best solution: css-tricks.com/dangers-stopping-event-propagation – Tom May 20 '14 at 10:52

You can hook up to the click event of document and then make sure #menucontainer is not an ancestor or the target of the clicked element (.closest(), .is()).

If it is not, then the clicked element is outside of the #menucontainer and you can safely hide it.

$(document).click(function(event) { 
    if(!$(event.target).closest('#menucontainer').length &&
       !$(event.target).is('#menucontainer')) {
        if($('#menucontainer').is(":visible")) {
            $('#menucontainer').hide();
        }
    }        
})
share|improve this answer
6  
Had issues with the live() and this works like charm! cheers! – chchrist Nov 11 '11 at 9:54
13  
I tried many of the other answers, but only this one worked. Thanks. The code I ended up using was this: $(document).click( function(event) { if( $(event.target).closest('.window').length == 0 ) { $('.window').fadeOut('fast'); } } ); – Pistos Apr 5 '12 at 19:30
19  
I actually ended up going with this solution because it better supports multiple menus on the same page where clicking on a second menu while a first is open will leave the first open in the stopPropagation solution. – umassthrower Apr 7 '12 at 23:41
6  
This is a very good solution for multiple items on the page. – jsgroove Dec 4 '12 at 15:19
6  
Excellent answer. This is the way to go when you have multiple items which you wish to close. – John May 8 '13 at 15:23

I have an application that works similarly to Eran's example, except I attach the click event to the body when I open the menu... Kinda like this:

$('#menucontainer').click(function(event) {
  $('html').one('click',function() {
    // Hide the menus
  });

  event.stopPropagation();
});

More information on jQuery's one() function

share|improve this answer
5  
but then if you click on the menu itself, then outside, it won't work :) – vsync Aug 17 '09 at 16:46
1  
It helps to put event.stopProgagantion() before binding the click listener to body. – Jasper Kennis Apr 19 '12 at 10:05
2  
The problem with this is that "one" applies to the jQuery method of adding events to an array multiple times. So if you click on the menu to open it more than once, the event is bound to the body again and attempts to hide the menu multiple times. A failsafe should be applied to fix this issue. – marksyzm Jun 24 '13 at 11:01
    
After binding using .one -- inside of the $('html') handler -- write a $('html').off('click'). – Cody Jul 13 '15 at 18:01
2  
@Cody I don't think that helps. The one handler will automatically call off (as it's shown in the jQuery docs). – Protron Dec 4 '15 at 18:12

The other solutions here didn't work for me so I had to use:

if(!$(event.target).is('#foo'))
{
	// hide menu
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've posted another practical example of how to use event.target to avoid triggering other Jquery UI widget outside-click html handlers when embedding them in your own pop-over box: Best way to get the Original Target – Joey T Jul 2 '12 at 18:13
24  
This worked for me, except I added && !$(event.target).parents("#foo").is("#foo") inside the IF statement so that any child elements won't close the menu when clicked. – honyovk Sep 26 '12 at 19:57
    
@Frug Your reply may be valuable so you got 5, but I got confused by your reply. and who is MBJ. I was looking to create better solution based on your reply. – Satya Prakash Sep 30 '13 at 14:25
    
MBJ was probably the old name of the person who posted the comment just above mine. Users change names, it can make it difficult but notice the comment above mine has an added .parents("#foo") – Frug Nov 5 '13 at 0:52
    
Can't find better than: // We're outside $(event.target).parents('#foo').length == 0 – AlexG Dec 15 '13 at 11:12
$("#menuscontainer").click(function() {
    $(this).focus();
});
$("#menuscontainer").blur(function(){
    $(this).hide();
});

Works for me just fine.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the one I'd use. It may not be perfect, but as a hobby programmer, its simple enough to understand clearly. – kevtrout Feb 8 '10 at 16:05
    
blur is a move outside the #menucontainer the question was about a click – borrel Aug 6 '13 at 13:22
3  
@borrel blur is not a move outside the container. Blur is the opposite of focus, you are thinking of mouseout. This solution worked particularly well for me when I was creating "click to edit" text where I swapped back and forth between plain text and input fields on clicks. – parker.sikand Oct 10 '13 at 22:08
    
I had to add tabindex="-1" to the #menuscontainer to make it work. It seems that if you put an input tag inside the container and click on it, the container gets hidden. – tyrion Aug 12 '14 at 13:17
    
the mouseleave event is more suitable for menus and containers (ref: w3schools.com/jquery/…) – Evgenia Manolova Oct 19 '15 at 1:35

Now there is a plugin for that: outside events (blog post)

The following happens when a clickoutside handler (WLOG) is bound to an element:

  • the element is added to an array which holds all elements with clickoutside handlers
  • a (namespaced) click handler is bound to the document (if not already there)
  • on any click in the document, the clickoutside event is triggered for those elements in that array that are not equal to or a parent of the click-events target
  • additionally, the event.target for the clickoutside event is set to the element the user clicked on (so you even know what the user clicked, not just that he clicked outside)

So no events are stopped from propagation and additional click handlers may be used "above" the element with the outside-handler.

share|improve this answer

This worked for me perfectly!!

$('html').click(function (e) {
    if (e.target.id == 'YOUR-DIV-ID') {
        //do something
    } else {
        //do something
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
This solution worked well for what I was doing, where I still needed the click event to bubble up, thanks. – Mike Jul 23 '12 at 2:10

I don't think what you really need is to close the menu when the user clicks outside; what you need is for the menu to close when the user clicks anywhere at all on the page. If you click on the menu, or off the menu it should close right?

Finding no satisfactory answers above prompted me to write this blog post the other day. For the more pedantic, there are a number of gotchas to take note of:

  1. If you attach a click event handler to the body element at click time be sure to wait for the 2nd click before closing the menu, and unbinding the event. Otherwise the click event that opened the menu will bubble up to the listener that has to close the menu.
  2. If you use event.stopPropogation() on a click event, no other elements in your page can have a click-anywhere-to-close feature.
  3. Attaching a click event handler to the body element indefinitely is not a performant solution
  4. Comparing the target of the event, and its parents to the handler's creator assumes that what you want is to close the menu when you click off it, when what you really want is to close it when you click anywhere on the page.
  5. Listening for events on the body element will make your code more brittle. Styling as innocent as this would break it: body { margin-left:auto; margin-right: auto; width:960px;}
share|improve this answer

Check the window click event target (it should propagate to the window, as long as it's not captured anywhere else), and ensure that it's not any of the menu elements. If it's not, then you're outside your menu.

Or check the position of the click, and see if it's contained within the menu area.

share|improve this answer

I've had success with something like this:

var $menuscontainer = ...;

$('#trigger').click(function() {
  $menuscontainer.show();

  $('body').click(function(event) {
    var $target = $(event.target);

    if ($target.parents('#menuscontainer').length == 0) {
      $menuscontainer.hide();
    }
  });
});

The logic is: when #menuscontainer is shown, bind a click handler to body that hides #menuscontainer only if the target (of the click) isn't a child of #menuscontainer.

share|improve this answer
    
By far, the most elegant solution. – Hussein El Motayam Mar 5 at 19:49

Found this method in some jquery calendar plugin.

function ClickOutsideCheck(e)
{
  var el = e.target;
  var popup = $('.popup:visible')[0];
  if(popup==undefined) return true;

  while (true){
    if (el == popup ) {
      return true;
    } else if (el == document) {
      $(".popup").hide();
      return false;
    } else {
      el = $(el).parent()[0];
    }
  }
};

$(document).bind('mousedown.popup', ClickOutsideCheck);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for reading other people's code. Sometimes the answer is already in plugins you are using :) – parker.sikand Oct 10 '13 at 22:10

As another poster said there are a lot of gotchas, especially if the element you are displaying (in this case a menu) has interactive elements. I've found the following method to be fairly robust:

$('#menuscontainer').click(function(event) {
    //your code that shows the menus fully

    //now set up an event listener so that clicking anywhere outside will close the menu
    $('html').click(function(event) {
        //check up the tree of the click target to check whether user has clicked outside of menu
        if ($(event.target).parents('#menuscontainer').length==0) {
            // your code to hide menu

            //this event listener has done its job so we can unbind it.
            $(this).unbind(event);
        }

    })
});
share|improve this answer
    
This option I was looking for. Thank you so much. – Mahib Mar 3 at 19:01

As variant:

var $menu = $('#menucontainer'); 
$(document).on('click', function (e) {
    // if element is opened and click target is outside it, hide it 
    if ($menu.is(':visible') && !$menu.is(e.target) && !$menu.has(e.target).length) {
        $menu.hide(); 
    }
});

Has no problem with stopping event propagation and better supports multiple menus on the same page where clicking on a second menu while a first is open will leave the first open in the stopPropagation solution.

share|improve this answer

Instead using flow interruption, blur/focus event or any other tricky technics, simply match event flow with element's kinship:

$(document).on("click.menu-outside", function(event){
    // Test if target and it's parent aren't #menuscontainer
    // That means the click event occur on other branch of document tree
    if(!$(event.target).parents().andSelf().is("#menuscontainer")){
        // Click outisde #menuscontainer
        // Hide the menus (but test if menus aren't already hidden)
    }
});

To remove click outside event listener, simply:

$(document).off("click.menu-outside");
share|improve this answer
    
To me this was the best solution. Used it in a callback after animation so I needed to the detach event somehwere. +1 – qwertzman May 29 '14 at 11:09
    
There is a redundant check here. if the element is indeed #menuscontainer you are still going through it's parents. you should first check that, and if it's not that element, then go up the DOM tree. – vsync Aug 25 '14 at 14:25
    
Right ! You can change the condition to if(!($(event.target).is("#menuscontainer") || $(event.target).parents().is("#menuscontainer"))){. It's a tiny optimization, but occurs only few times in your program lifetime : for each click, if the click.menu-outside event is registered. It's longer (+32 chars) and don't use method chaining – mems Aug 25 '14 at 14:40

If you are scripting for IE and FF 3.* and you just want to know if the click occured within a certain box area, you could also use something like:

this.outsideElementClick = function(objEvent, objElement){   
var objCurrentElement = objEvent.target || objEvent.srcElement;
var blnInsideX = false;
var blnInsideY = false;

if (objCurrentElement.getBoundingClientRect().left >= objElement.getBoundingClientRect().left && objCurrentElement.getBoundingClientRect().right <= objElement.getBoundingClientRect().right)
    blnInsideX = true;

if (objCurrentElement.getBoundingClientRect().top >= objElement.getBoundingClientRect().top && objCurrentElement.getBoundingClientRect().bottom <= objElement.getBoundingClientRect().bottom)
    blnInsideY = true;

if (blnInsideX && blnInsideY)
    return false;
else
    return true;}
share|improve this answer

Instead of using event.stopPropagation() which can have some side affects, just define a simple flag variable and add one if condition. I tested this and worked properly without any side affects of stopPropagation:

var flag = "1";
$('#menucontainer').click(function(event){
  flag = "0"; //flag 0 means click happened in the area where we should not do any action
});

$('html').click(function() {
  if(flag != "0"){
     //Hide the menus if visible
   }
  else{
   flag = "1";
   }
});
share|improve this answer
    
I used this solution with a boolean flag and it's good also with a articulated DOm and also if inside #menucontainer there are a lot of other elements – Migio B Feb 28 '15 at 20:28

After research i have found three working solutions (forgot the page links for reference)

First solution

<script>
//The good thing about this solution is it doesn't stop event propagation.

var clickFlag=0;
$('body').on('click', function () {
    if(clickFlag==0){
        console.log('hide element here'); 
        /* hide element here*/
    }
    else{
        clickFlag=0;
    }
});
$('body').on('click','#testDiv', function (event) {
    clickFlag=1;
    console.log('showed the element');
    /*show the element*/
});
</script>

Second solution

<script>
$('body').on('click', function(e) {
    if($(e.target).closest('#testDiv').length == 0) {
       /*hide dropdown here*/
    }
});
</script>

Third solution

<script>
var specifiedElement = document.getElementById('testDiv');
document.addEventListener('click', function(event) {
  var isClickInside = specifiedElement.contains(event.target);
  if (isClickInside) {
    console.log('You clicked inside')
  } else {
    console.log('You clicked outside')
  }
});
</script>
share|improve this answer

Attach a click event to the document which closes the window. Attaching it to the body only attaches an event to how far the page flows vertically. I used Eran's solution originally but it didn't work for me since my page was very short vertically. Attach a separate click event to the window which stops propagation to the document itself.

 $(document).click(function() { 
 //Hide the menus if visible 
 }); 

 $('#menucontainer').click(function(e){ 
     e.stopPropagation(); 
 });
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the same as the top answer? – 472084 Mar 1 '13 at 10:37

This worked perfectly fine in time for me :

$('body').click(function() {
    // Hide the menus if visible.
});

Thanks very much!

share|improve this answer
1  
the problem whit this its that no matter where you click, you always gonna have the event bubble down to the body. so you should use event.stopPropagation but that would break that natural way of how the DOM Behave I dont think this is a good practice – ncubica Nov 21 '14 at 0:43
$(document).click(function() {
    $(".overlay-window").hide();
});
$(".overlay-window").click(function() {
    return false;
});

If you click on the document, hide a given element, unless you click on that same element.

share|improve this answer

Hook a click event listener on the document. Inside the event listener, you can look at the event object, in particular, the event.target to see what element was clicked:

$(document).click(function(e){
    if ($(e.target).closest("#menuscontainer").length == 0) {
        // .closest can help you determine if the element 
        // or one of its ancestors is #menuscontainer
        console.log("hide");
    }
});
share|improve this answer
var go=false;
$(document).click(function(){
   if(go){
$('#divID').hide();go=false;} 
})
$("#divID").mouseover(function(){
   go=false;
});
$("#divID").mouseout(function (){
   go=true;
});

$("btnID").click( function(){
   if($("#divID:visible").length==1) $("#divID").hide(); //toggle 
   $("#divID").show();
});
share|improve this answer

I ended up doing something like this:

$(document).on('click', 'body, #msg_count_results .close',function() {
    $(document).find('#msg_count_results').remove();
});
$(document).on('click','#msg_count_results',function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    return false;
});

I have a close button within the new container for end users friendly UI purposes. I had to use return false in order to not go through. Of course, having an A HREF on there to take you somewhere would be nice, or you could call some ajax stuff instead. Either way, it works ok for me. Just what I wanted.

share|improve this answer

I did like this in YUI3:

// detect the click anywhere other than overlay element to close it.
Y.one(document).on('click', function (e) {
    if (e.target.ancestor('#overlay') === null && e.target.get('id') != 'show' && overlay.get('visible') == true) {
        overlay.hide();
    }
});

I am checking if ancestor is not the widget element container,
if target is not which open the widget/element,
if widget/element I want to close is already open (not that important).

share|improve this answer

Here is the vanilla javascript solution for future viewers.

Upon clicking any element within the document, if the clicked element's id is toggle, or the hidden element is not hidden and the hidden element does not contain the clicked element, toggle the element.

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var hidden = document.getElementById('hidden');
    document.addEventListener('click', function (e) {
        if (e.target.id == 'toggle' || (hidden.style.display != 'none' && !hidden.contains(e.target))) hidden.style.display = hidden.style.display == 'none' ? 'block' : 'none';
    }, false);
})();

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var hidden = document.getElementById('hidden');
    document.addEventListener('click', function (e) {
        if (e.target.id == 'toggle' || (hidden.style.display != 'none' && !hidden.contains(e.target))) hidden.style.display = hidden.style.display == 'none' ? 'block' : 'none';
    }, false);
})();
<a href="javascript:void(0)" id="toggle">Toggle Hidden Div</a>
<div id="hidden" style="display: none;">This content is normally hidden. click anywhere other than this content to make me disappear</div>

If you are going to have multiple toggles on the same page you can use something like this

  1. Add the class name hidden to the collapsible item.
  2. Upon document click, close all hidden elements which do not contain the clicked element and are not hidden
  3. if the clicked element is a toggle, toggle the specified element.

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var hiddenItems = document.getElementsByClassName('hidden'), hidden;
    document.addEventListener('click', function (e) {
        for (var i = 0; hidden = hiddenItems[i]; i++) {
            if (!hidden.contains(e.target) && hidden.style.display != 'none')
                hidden.style.display = 'none';
        }
        if (e.target.getAttribute('data-toggle')) {
            var toggle = document.querySelector(e.target.getAttribute('data-toggle'));
            toggle.style.display = toggle.style.display == 'none' ? 'block' : 'none';
        }
    }, false);
})();
<a href="javascript:void(0)" data-toggle="#hidden1">Toggle Hidden Div</a>
<div class="hidden" id="hidden1" style="display: none;" data-hidden="true">This content is normally hidden</div>
<a href="javascript:void(0)" data-toggle="#hidden2">Toggle Hidden Div</a>
<div class="hidden" id="hidden2" style="display: none;" data-hidden="true">This content is normally hidden</div>
<a href="javascript:void(0)" data-toggle="#hidden3">Toggle Hidden Div</a>
<div class="hidden" id="hidden3" style="display: none;" data-hidden="true">This content is normally hidden</div>

share|improve this answer

We implemented a solution, partly based off a comment from a user above, which works perfectly for us. We use it to hide a search box / results when clicking outside those elements, excluding the element that originally.

// HIDE SEARCH BOX IF CLICKING OUTSIDE
$(document).click(function(event){ 
    // IF NOT CLICKING THE SEARCH BOX OR ITS CONTENTS OR SEARCH ICON 
    if ($("#search-holder").is(":visible") && !$(event.target).is("#search-holder *, #search")) {
        $("#search-holder").fadeOut('fast');
        $("#search").removeClass('active');
    }
});

It checks if the search box is already visible first also, and in our case, it's also removing an active class on the hide/show search button.

share|improve this answer

Upvote for the most popular answer, but add

&& (e.target != $('html').get(0)) // ignore the scrollbar

so, a click on a scroll bar does not [hide or whatever] your target element.

share|improve this answer

Simple solution for the situation is

$(document).mouseup(function (e)
{
var container = $("YOUR SELECTOR"); // Give you class or ID

if (!container.is(e.target) // if the target of the click is not the desired div or section
    && container.has(e.target).length === 0) // ... nor a descendant-child of the container
{
    container.hide();
}
});

The above script will hide the div if outside of the Div, click event is triggered

share|improve this answer
    
Very clean and simple, thank you! – Christina Jan 25 at 23:51

function:

$(function() {
    $.fn.click_inout = function(clickin_handler, clickout_handler) {
        var item = this;
        var is_me = false;
        item.click(function(event) {
            clickin_handler(event);
            is_me = true;
        });
        $(document).click(function(event) {
            if (is_me) {
                is_me = false;
            } else {
                clickout_handler(event);
            }
        });
        return this;
    }
});

usage:

    this.input = $('<input>')
        .click_inout(
            function(event) { me.ShowTree(event); },
            function() { me.Hide(); }
        )
        .appendTo(this.node);

and functions are very simple:

ShowTree: function(event) {
    this.data_span.show();
}
Hide: function() {
    this.data_span.hide();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this trigger the clickout event also in the case when a child element of the container is clicked? – Janis Aug 20 '12 at 14:28

Here is my code:

// listen to every clicks
$('html').click(function(event) {
    if ( $('#mypopupmenu').is(':visible') ) {
        if (event.target.id != 'click_this_to_show_mypopupmenu') {
            $('#mypopupmenu').hide();
        }
    }
});

// listen to selector's clicks
$('#click_this_to_show_mypopupmenu').click(function() {
  // if the menu is visible, and you clicked the selector again we need to hide
  if ( $('#mypopupmenu').is(':visible') {
      $('#mypopupmenu').hide();
      return true;
  }

  // else we need to show the popup menu
  $('#mypopupmenu').show();
});
share|improve this answer

protected by Mohammad Adil Jun 24 '13 at 20:59

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