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CODE:

double cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd)
    .Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);

ERROR:

The cast to value type 'Double' failed because the materialized value is null. Either the result type's generic parameter or the query must use a nullable type.

WHAT I HAVE SEEN ALREADY:

The cast to value type 'Int32' failed because the materialized value is null

The cast to value type 'Decimal' failed because the materialized value is null

WHAT I HAVE TRIED:

double cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd)
    .DefaultIfEmpty()
    .Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);

And:

double? cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd)
    .Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);

Neither of these work. I know the cause of the problem is that there are no rows in that table for the UserId I am passing in. In that case, I would prefer Sum() just returned a 0 to me. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
You should mark as answer from any below solutions which is most suitable and efficient. –  Jitendra Pancholi Dec 29 '14 at 10:53

5 Answers 5

Best Solution

double cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd)
    .Sum(x => (double?)(x.Quantity * x.Price)) ?? 0;
share|improve this answer
1  
Great! That the way to go. –  Mahmoodvcs Dec 28 '13 at 12:27

You can check if the collection has any correct results.

double? cafeSales = null;
var invoices = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd
    )
    .Where(x => x.Quantity != null && x.Price != null);
if (invoices.Any()) {
    cafeSales = invoices.Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did come up with something similar myself just now, but I was hoping there'd be a cleaner way to do it.. in one statement. –  Matt Mar 8 '13 at 16:01
    
Will give you +1 anyway –  Matt Mar 8 '13 at 16:01

This should do the trick (you may have to remove one of the conditions if either Quantity or Price are not nullable):

var cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
    .Where(x =>
        x.UserId == user.UserId &&
        x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
        x.DateCharged <= dateEnd &&
        x.Quantity != null &&
        x.Price != null);

double cafeSalesTotal = 0;

if (cafeSales.Any())
{
    cafeSalesTotal = cafeSales.Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);
}
share|improve this answer

I know this is a bit old but just in case it helps anyone.

@Matt I guess the DefaultIFEmpty() method should work for you just in case you pass a default value for the column that you are applying Sum onto. This method has some overloads which you might want to check and I suggest type-casting if overloads do not support your requirement.

 (query).DefaultIfEmpty(0) 
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It helped me. This is a great way to go. –  Meryovi Jun 7 '14 at 16:25
 var cafeSales = db.InvoiceLines
.Where(x =>
    x.UserId == user.UserId &&
    x.DateCharged >= dateStart &&
    x.DateCharged <= dateEnd)
.Sum(x => x.Quantity * x.Price);

double i;
if(cafeSales==null) ? i=0 : i=(double)cafeSales.First();
share|improve this answer
1  
Sum(...) will not return an enumerable, so calling a First() on the result of a Sum(...) will turn into a compile-time-error. –  Maarten Mar 8 '13 at 16:00
    
Good catch, annoyingly I edited it to add the First() –  James Mar 8 '13 at 16:36
    
does it make any sense? :o if(cafeSales==null) ? i=0 : i=(double)cafeSales.First(); –  Michael Brennt May 20 '14 at 9:53

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