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I have tried a lot of different solutions to this problem and I just can't seem to figure out why the compiler continues to give me this error in my header file. If somebody could please give me some insight, that would be very much appreciated. EDIT: Sorry forgot which line is giving the error. It's in the header file the line: Date(string mstr, int dd, int yy);

And yes I know the this = new Date... is a bad solution, I'm just working it out a bit ;)

Header:

#include <string>

#ifndef DATE_H
#define DATE_H

class Date{
    public:
        Date(int mm, int dd, int yy);
        Date(string mstr, int dd, int yy);
        void print();
        void printFullDate();
        void prompt();

        void setMonth(int);
        void setDay(int);
        void setYear(int);

        int getMonth();
        int getDay();
        int getYear();

        static const int monthsPerYear = 12;
    private:
        int month;
        int day;
        int year;

        int checkDay(int);
};

#endif

And here is the implementation if you need it(It's not totally finished, I'm just trying to test out some of the functions I've written):

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include "Date.h"
using namespace std;

Date::Date(int mm, int dd, int yy){
    setMonth(mm);
    setYear(yy);
    setDay(dd);
}

Date::Date(string mstr, int dd, int yy){
    cout << "It's working";
}

int Date::getDay(){
    return day;
}

int Date::getMonth(){
    return month;
}

int Date::getYear(){
    return year;
}

void Date::setDay( int dd ){
    day = checkDay(dd);
}

void Date::setMonth( int mm ){
    if( mm > 0 && mm <= monthsPerYear)
        month = mm;
    else
        throw invalid_argument("month must be 1-12");

}

void Date::setYear( int yy ){
    year = yy;
}

int Date::checkDay( int testDay){
    static const int daysPerMonth[ monthsPerYear + 1 ] = {0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31};

    if( testDay > 0 && testDay <= daysPerMonth[ getMonth() ])
        return testDay;
    if( getMonth() == 2 && testDay == 29 && (getYear() % 400 == 0 || ( getYear() % 4 == 0 && getYear() % 100 != 0 ) ) )
        return testDay;
    throw invalid_argument("Invalid day for current month and year");
}

void Date::print(){

}

void Date::printFullDate(){

}

void Date::prompt(){
    int userChoice = 1;
    int mm, dd, yy;
    string monthStr;

    while(userChoice != 3){
        cout << "Enter 1 for format: MM/DD/YYYY" << endl;
        cout << "Enter 2 for format: Month DD, YYYY" << endl;
        cout << "Enter 3 to exit" << endl;
        cout << "Choice: " << endl;
        cin >> userChoice;
        while(userChoice < 1 || userChoice > 3){
            cout << "Please enter a number 1 - 3 for the formats above." << endl;
            cout << "Choice: " << endl;
            cin >> userChoice;
        }
        if(userChoice != 3){
            switch(userChoice){
                case 1:
                    cout << "Enter Month (1 - 12): ";
                    cin >> mm;
                    setMonth(mm);
                    cout << "Enter Day of Month: ";
                    cin >> dd;
                    setDay(dd);
                    cout << "Enter Year: ";
                    cin >> yy;
                    setYear(yy);
                    break;
                case 2:
                    cout << "Enter Month Name: ";
                    cin >> monthStr;
                    cout << "Enter Day of Month: ";
                    cin >> dd;
                    cout << "Enter Year: ";
                    cin >> yy;
                    this = new Date(monthStr, dd, yy);
                    break;
                default:
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Among the many different solutions you have tried, have you tried adding an #include <string> directive? –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 15:56
3  
Oh, and also using std::string rather than just string unless you have a using declaration –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 15:56
1  
And this: this = new Date(monthStr, dd, yy); is criminal :-) –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 15:57
    
In the header you need std::string instead of string –  Thibaut Mar 8 '13 at 15:58
    
Okay I fixed the String problem by including std::string. Now I have to fix that this = new Date(monthStr, dd, yy); lol –  LSavage Mar 8 '13 at 16:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Problem #1: Add an include directive for string

#include <string>

Problem #2: Use the fully qualified std::string rather than just string, or place a using-declaration before your class definition:

using std::string;

Problem #3: You cannot reassign the this pointer:

this = new Date(monthStr, dd, yy); // ERROR!

What you are trying to do should be probably re-written as:

*this = Date(monthStr, dd, yy);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 (and I'd send another if SO would let me). –  WhozCraig Mar 8 '13 at 16:03
    
Thank you! This was the answer I needed! Although using *this is still giving me errors. I guess I got some more work to do to get this to work ;P –  LSavage Mar 8 '13 at 16:04
    
@WhozCraig: That would be too generous ;-) –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 16:06
1  
@user1378664: Is the code different from the one you posted? And did you remove the new? –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 16:10
4  
@LSavage: the this pointer is a pointer to the current object. Even if you could change it, it would not change the object itself, just the pointer. But you can't change it anyway, it is immutable (and you really want it to be so!). In every member function of a class, you know this points to the object on which the member function was invoked. On the other hand, *this dereferences that pointer to obtain a reference to the current object, and operator = is (implicitly) defined for objects of type Date. I can't explain any better in a few words, try googling for some tutorial ;) –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 16:22

use std::string or declare using namespace std; at the beginning of the code.

share|improve this answer

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