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Given the enum:

[Flags]
public enum mytest
{
    a = 1,
    b = 2,
    c = 4
}

I've come up with two ways to represent all values in a single variable:

    var OR1 = (mytest)Enum.GetNames(typeof(mytest)).Sum(a => (int)Enum.Parse(typeof(mytest), a));
    var OR2 = (mytest)(typeof(mytest).GetEnumValues() as mytest[]).Sum(a => (int)a);

Now, although they both work, is there a neater way? Possibly a .NET method I'm missing?

Edit: For clarification, I need the function to be dynamic - I don't want to calculate it by specifying every single enum value.

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7  
You can also have an All enum member that is the sum. –  Oded Mar 8 '13 at 16:08
1  
Half-serious suggestion: In some cases you could just do: int all = ~0; –  Matthew Watson Mar 8 '13 at 16:32

6 Answers 6

If it makes sense to have an All member, just provide it directly:

[Flags]
public enum mytest
{
    a = 1,
    b = 2,
    c = 4,
    All = 7
}

Though, a more idiomatic way to write these could be:

[Flags]
public enum MyTest
{
    A = 1,
    B = 1 << 0x01,
    C = 1 << 0x02,
    All = A | B | C
}

This shows the logical progression of the enum values, and in the All case, makes it easy to add another member.

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2  
@Downvoter - care to comment? –  Oded Mar 8 '13 at 16:10
2  
Not my downvote, but perhaps the idea of hardcoding a specific enum to represent all others isnt ideal - if I add an enum value, then I have to make two changes every time. Plus the code in the other examples wouldnt work. –  maxp Mar 8 '13 at 16:13
2  
It's also common to provide a None member equal to 0 when creating flag enums. –  JamieSee Mar 8 '13 at 16:14
2  
Sum doesn't work if you have overlapping values. e.g. { 1, 2, 4, 7, 8 }. The Or is 15, the Sum is 22 –  p.s.w.g Mar 8 '13 at 16:17
4  
Also, I usually specify flag values using hex as it makes it easier to see the progression than decimal. –  JamieSee Mar 8 '13 at 16:25

Use Enumerable.Aggregate() to bitwise-or them together. This will work even if you have enum values that represent multiple set bits, as opposed to Sum().

var myTestValues = (MyTest[]) typeof(MyTest).GetEnumValues();
var sum = myTestValues.Aggregate((a, b) => a | b);
sum.Dump();

It's a little tricky to make this generic because you can't constrain generic types to be enums, nor do the primitive types have any subtype relationship to one another. The best I could come up with assumes that the underlying type is int which should be good enough most of the time:

TEnum AllEnums<TEnum>() 
{
    var values = typeof(TEnum).GetEnumValues().Cast<int>();
    return (TEnum) (object) values.Aggregate((a,b) => a|b);
}
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Why do you need Enum.ToObject? I'm not 100% sure, but doesn't the cast work by itself? –  p.s.w.g Mar 8 '13 at 16:22
    
@p.s.w.g It doesn't, because you can't cast unrelated types (int to the unconstrained TEnum) willy-nilly. For a cast to be legal the compiler has to know there's at least a possibility of it making sense, and it knows that int isn't really castable to anything without an explicit conversion of some sort. (This I admit is mostly a guesstimate of the rules, but either way the compiler complains about a direct cast.) –  millimoose Mar 8 '13 at 16:25
    
@p.s.w.g Scratch that, turns out you're right after all. (Even if the double-cast construct is kind of hilarious.) –  millimoose Mar 8 '13 at 16:29
    
+1 for the double-cast trick –  p.s.w.g Mar 8 '13 at 16:44
    
@p.s.w.g I'd actually really love to know why the compiler will accept that but not a direct cast. –  millimoose Mar 8 '13 at 16:45

For a generic method, use Linq's Enumerable.Aggregate extension method;

var flags = Enum.GetValues(typeof(mytest))
                .Cast<int>()
                .Aggregate(0, (s, f) => s | f);

Or in a wrapper method

TEnum GetAll<TEnum>() where TEnum : struct
{
    return (TEnum) (object)
            Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
                .Cast<int>()
                .Aggregate(0, (s, f) => s | f);
}

full credit for this double-cast trick goes to @millimoose

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+1 Just put it in a generic method and you'll be able to use it for any enum. T GetAll<T>() { return (T)(object)Enum.GetValues(typeof(T))... } –  Adriano Repetti Mar 8 '13 at 16:34
    
unfortunately if the underlying enum type is a different size than int it with throw an invalid cast exception. I have a solution below –  dmihailescu Dec 20 '13 at 23:55

The easiest way to ensure that all of the enum's bits are set it to just set all bits:

mytest allValues = (mytest)int.MaxValue;

This assumes that there's no problem setting bits that don't correspond to any enum, but that's likely true. You can AND this with any enum value and it will come out true, which is most likely the end goal.

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Are you certain this code works? I think i tried someonething similar a while ago that didnt. –  maxp Mar 8 '13 at 16:20
    
@maxp Works fine for me in a few simple tests. Can you come up with a test case that doesn't work? –  Servy Mar 8 '13 at 16:23
    
This does work. Just tested it because I thought the cast would raise an exception, but nope. It works. –  istepaniuk Mar 8 '13 at 16:23
    
@istepaniuk Obviously if the enum is backed by a different numeric field, such as a short or long, you'll need to use the appropriate type's MaxValue method, but that'll all that would need to change. –  Servy Mar 8 '13 at 16:24
1  
You're creating an "invalid" enum and you can't simply compare it with ==. Moreover...it matches any combination...how can you use it to check if all flags are set? –  Adriano Repetti Mar 8 '13 at 16:26

How about something like

var all = Enum.GetValues(typeof(MyEnum)).Cast<MyEnum>().Last() * 2 - 1;

basically

all = max*2-1

this only works if all values are present from 1 to the max value.

1,2,4...32,64...

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It is not as easy as it looks at first sight given the underlying type cast issues:

static public TEnum GetAllFlags<TEnum>() where TEnum : struct, IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible
    {
        unchecked
        {
            if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
                throw new InvalidOperationException("Can't get flags from non Enum");
            object val = null;
            switch (Type.GetTypeCode(Enum.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(TEnum))))
            {
                case TypeCode.Byte:
                case TypeCode.SByte:
                    val = Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
                                .Cast<Byte>()
                                .Aggregate(default(Byte), ( s, f) => (byte)(s | f));
                    break;
                case TypeCode.Int16:
                case TypeCode.UInt16:
                    val = Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
                                .Cast<UInt16>()
                                .Aggregate(default(UInt16), ( s, f) => (UInt16)(s | f));
                    break;
                case TypeCode.Int32:
                case TypeCode.UInt32:
                    val = Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
                                .Cast<UInt32>()
                                .Aggregate(default(UInt32), ( s, f) => (UInt32)(s | f));
                    break;
                case TypeCode.Int64:
                case TypeCode.UInt64:
                    val = Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum))
                                .Cast<UInt64>()
                                .Aggregate(default(UInt64), ( s, f) => (UInt64)(s | f));
                    break;
                default :
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("unhandled enum underlying type");

            }
            return (TEnum)Enum.ToObject(typeof(TEnum), val);
        }
    }

More about this kind of conversions can be found here

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