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This is related in spirit to this question, but must be different in mechanism.

If you try to cache a knitr chunk that contains a data.table := assignement then it acts as though that chunk has not been run, and later chunks do not see the affect of the :=.

Any idea why this is? How does knitr detect objects have updated, and what is data.table doing that confuses it?

It appears you can work around this by doing DT = DT[, LHS:=RHS].

Example:

```{r}
library(data.table)
```
Data.Table Markdown
========================================================
Suppose we make a `data.table` in **R Markdown**
```{r, cache=TRUE}
DT = data.table(a = rnorm(10))
```
Then add a column using `:=`
```{r, cache=TRUE}
DT[, c:=5] 
```
Then we display that in a non-cached block
```{r, cache=FALSE}
DT
```
The first time you run this, the above will show a `c` column, 
from the second time onwards it will not.

Output on second run

knitr output

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+1 I've got no inkling about this I'm afraid. When you say the "second time onwards" do you mean a repeat of DT, a repeat of DT inside the cache=FALSE block, or a rerun of the script? There's nothing after "output on second run" - is that the point i.e. it's completely blank or did you forget to paste something there. Try inspecting the object with .Internal(inspect(DT)) at various points. How is the knitr cache implemented? –  Matt Dowle Mar 8 '13 at 17:11
    
@MatthewDowle -- It's a bit speculative (b/c I didn't feel like delving into knitr's caching mechanism) but I suspect my answer below gets at least the big picture right. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 8 '13 at 17:20
    
@JoshO'Brien Cool, sounds rights to me, thanks. Will aim to come back to it and change either knitr or data.table to play nice together, but this solution is nice in the meantime. –  Matt Dowle Mar 8 '13 at 17:54
1  
@MatthewDowle -- Seems to me it's better fixed on the knitr side, and Yihui seems to agree. BTW, many thanks for making the changes needed to get data.table working under R-3.0.0! Was getting rid of all the non-API calls a lot of work? –  Josh O'Brien Mar 8 '13 at 19:37
    
@JoshO'Brien No problem. Not really, just a few hours. Brian Ripley helped a lot by letting me know Cstack_info() existed. I would have been stuck a long time without that tip. –  Matt Dowle Mar 8 '13 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Speculation:

Here is what appears to be going on.

knitr quite sensibly caches objects as as soon as they are created. It then updates their cached value whenever it detects that they have been altered.

data.table, though, bypasses R's normal copy-by-value assignment and replacement mechanisms, and uses a := operator rather than a =, <<-, or <-. As a result knitr isn't picking up the signals that DT has been changed by DT[, c:=5].

Solution:

Just add this block to your code wherever you'd like the current value of DT to be re-cached. It won't cost you anything memory or time-wise (since nothing except a reference is copied by DT <- DT) but it does effectively send a (fake) signal to knitr that DT has been updated:

```{r, cache=TRUE, echo=FALSE}
DT <- DT 
```

Working version of example doc:

Check that it works by running this edited version of your doc:

```{r}
library(data.table)
```
Data.Table Markdown
========================================================
Suppose we make a `data.table` in **R Markdown**
```{r, cache=TRUE}
DT = data.table(a = rnorm(10))
```

Then add a column using `:=`
```{r, cache=TRUE}
DT[, c:=5] 
```

```{r, cache=TRUE, echo=FALSE}
DT <- DT 
```

Then we display that in a non-cached block
```{r, cache=FALSE}
DT
```
The first time you run this, the above will show a `c` column. 
The second, third, and nth times, it will as well.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that - any guesses what would be involved in making knitr pick up on :=. Would it be a matter of making data.table give the correct signals, or making knitr watch out for :=? –  Corone Mar 8 '13 at 18:02
3  
@Corone in this case it sounds like a good idea to manually assign the object names to knitr to cache; I can consider it if you file a feature request: github.com/yihui/knitr/issues –  Yihui Mar 8 '13 at 18:15
    
@Yihui Hi. If there's something I can change on the data.table side just let me know. –  Matt Dowle Mar 9 '13 at 22:45
    
@MatthewDowle thanks, but it is probably hard; what I want is x=data.table(a=1:5); ev=new.env(); eval(quote({x[, b:=5]}), envir=ev) and x should also appear in the environment ev, but that apparently contradicts the philosophy of data.table. I have one possible solution in mind and I'll think more about it. –  Yihui Mar 10 '13 at 2:27
2  
@MatthewDowle -- Something like this should work: "evaluate" %in% sapply(sys.calls(), function(X) deparse(X[[1]])). (Searching the call stack for a call to evaluate might be safer than looking for knit, because it'll work better in cases where the call to knit was constructed 'programatically', as in do.call(knit, ...) or sapply(..., knit), etc.) –  Josh O'Brien Mar 12 '13 at 16:48

As indicated in the fourth comment under the answer by Josh O'Brien, I have added a new chunk option cache.vars to handle this very special case (currently it is in the development version but will be on CRAN soon). In the second cached chunk, we can specify cache.vars='DT' so that knitr will save a copy of DT.

```{r}
library(data.table)
```
Data.Table Markdown
========================================================
Suppose we make a `data.table` in **R Markdown**
```{r, cache=TRUE}
DT = data.table(a = rnorm(10))
```
Then add a column using `:=`
```{r, cache=TRUE, cache.vars='DT'}
DT[, c:=5] 
```
Then we display that in a non-cached block
```{r, cache=FALSE}
DT
```

The output is like this no matter how many times you compile the document:

knitr works with data.table now

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