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public class symm
{


/* 
 * Returns true if array A is symmetric.
 * Returns false otherwise.
 * n is the number of elements A contains.
 *
 * The running time of your algorithm is O(  ).
 * You may add a brief explanation here if you wish.
 */

 public static boolean symmetric( int[] A, int n )
 {
 return symmHelper(A, n, 0);

 }

private static boolean symmHelper(int[] A, int n, int i) {
if(n==1)
    return true;
if((n==2) && (A[i] == A[n-1-i]))
    return true;
if((i == n-1-i) && (A[i] == A[n-1-i] ))
    return true;    

if(A[i] == A[n-1-i] && i < n/2 )
    return symmHelper(A, n, i+1);

return false;
}  


}  

Test cases: I passed all the tests ecxept the fitst on I get no whenever I run it, I think the problem is that there are two 2s in the middle. And I'm not really sure about the code, I think it can be simplified. Is the running time o(log n)?

5 8 2 2 8 5 YES

10 7 50 16 20 16 50 7 10 YES

5 8 5 YES

1000 1000 YES

6000 YES

10 7 50 16 20 16 50 7 1000 NO

10 7 50 16 20 16 50 700 10 NO

10 7 50 16 20 16 5000 7 10 NO

10 7 50 16 20 1600 50 7 10 NO

10 7 50 16 1600 50 7 10 NO

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2  
But 5 8 2 2 8 5 is symmetrical. –  Popnoodles Mar 8 '13 at 17:01
1  
Add a print command to your function so you can see what i and n are each time through the recursion. Then you can use that to help walk through your if() statements and see when each one is firing. –  DiMono Mar 8 '13 at 17:06
    
BTw, This check if((i == n-1-i) && (A[i] == A[n-1-i] )) return true; is redudant and can be reduced to if(i == n-1-i) return true; You could even combine this case with the n == 1 case using the || operator. –  Tuxdude Mar 8 '13 at 17:10
    
@pamphlet oh yes I see your answer down there... –  Popnoodles Mar 8 '13 at 17:35
    
@popnoodles yes it is symmetrical, but my output was No. :) –  Moe Mar 8 '13 at 20:11
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Complex code makes for more mistakes. Thus, simplify it. Also, look for inequalities rather than equalities; it's easier to check for one mistake than for everything to be correct.

// A = array, n = size of array, i = looking at now
private static boolean symmHelper(int[] A, int n, int i) {

    if (i > n/2)     // If we're more than halfway without returning false yet, we win
        return true;

    else if (A[i] != A[n-1-i])    // If these two don't match, we lose
        return false;

    else    // If neither of those are the case, try again
        return symmHelper(A, n, i+1);
}

If I remember my O() notation right, I think this should be O(n+1). There are other tweaks you can make to this to remove the +1, but it'll make the code run slower overall.

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Thank you so much :) –  Moe Mar 8 '13 at 20:48
    
@DiMono Isn't O(n+1)=O(n). Only the highest power of the poly in the O notation matters. –  Dheeraj Bhaskar Apr 20 '13 at 15:02
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if(A[i] == A[n-1-i] && i < n/2 )

That line right there is the problem. Because you're using an even number > 2 of values, when it gets to this line it skips over it because at that point i = n/2, rather than being less than it. So the function skips that and continues on to return false. Change it to this and you should be fine:

if(A[i] == A[n-1-i] && i <= n/2 )
share|improve this answer
    
Not really. Truth is you should return true if i >= n/2 –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 8 '13 at 17:14
    
@DiMono both are not working! The problem is as you said, because I'm using an even number > 2, I'm not really sure how to deal with that! –  Moe Mar 8 '13 at 18:26
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This check is useless:

if((i == n-1-i) && (A[i] == A[n-1-i] ))
    return true;   

Of course if the two indices are the same the values there will match.

Also you need to split this if in two:

if(A[i] == A[n-1-i] && i < n/2 )
    return symmHelper(A, n, i+1);

And return true if i >= n/2.

Otherwise what happens is that after i > n/2 (which means you already know your array is symmetrical), you do not go into that if and thus return false, which is wrong.

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if I split them, it will return true if i >= n/2, even if the array in symmetric, isn't? –  Moe Mar 8 '13 at 18:22
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