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I am following a tutorial from one book and there is a tiny piece of code that I don't understand. Here comes the code:

// conv_ex.cs - Exercise 12.4
// This listing will cut the front of the string
// off when it finds a space, comma, or period.
// Letters and other characters will still cause
// bad data.
//-----------------------------------------------
using System;
using System.Text;

class myApp
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string buff;
        int age;
        // The following sets up an array of characters used 
        // to find a break for the Split method. 
        char[] delim = new char[] { ' ', ',', '.' };
        // The following is an array of strings that will
        // be used to hold the split strings returned from
        // the split method.
        string[] nbuff = new string[4];

        Console.Write("Enter your age: ");

        buff = Console.ReadLine();

        // break string up if it is in multiple pieces.
        // Exception handling not added

        nbuff = buff.Split(delim,2); //<----- what is purpose of (delim,2) in this case?
        //nbuff = buff.Split(delim); // will give the same result
        //nbuff = buff.Split(delim,3); //will give the same result


        // Now convert....

        try
        {
            age = Convert.ToInt32(nbuff[0]);
            Console.WriteLine("age is:" + age);

            if (age < 21)
                Console.WriteLine("You are under 21.");
            else
                Console.Write("You are 21 or older.");
        }
        catch (ArgumentException e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No value was entered... (equal to null)");
        }
        catch (OverflowException e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You entered a number that is too big or too small.");
        }
        catch (FormatException e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You didn't enter a valid number.");
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Something went wrong with the conversion.");
            throw (e);
        }
    }
}

My question is:

What is the purpose of "2" in nbuff = buff.Split(delim,2); ?

String will be split in two halves anyway, right?

Even if there is no "2" such as in nbuff = buff.Split(delim); result will be the same.

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closed as not constructive by Emil, Björn Kaiser, Stony, billz, Soner Gönül Mar 14 '13 at 14:12

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's the maximum number of substrings to return. The reason changing it to 3 has no effect is because there are fewer than 3 substrings to return and so, by design, it will return all the substrings available anyway. If there were potentially 5 substrings that could be returned, for example, then only the first 3 would be returned.

You can read more about the String.Split() method here.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but even if it is "1" or even if it is omitted result is the same, , so why "2" anyway? –  Nenad Bulatovic Mar 8 '13 at 17:10
    
From the context given, there doesn't seem to be any clear reason 2 was added but since it's from a textbook, there's a chance that the reason has been explained elsewhere (maybe in preparation for the next chapter/code snippet or something). –  keyboardP Mar 8 '13 at 17:13
    
@nenad Are you using one of the delimiters specified when entering a name? If the name doesn't contain one of the specified delimiters, then the string will not be split, and it will remain the same as the original string. In other words: nbuff[0] == buff will be true. –  Kenneth K. Mar 8 '13 at 17:13
    
@keyboardP reason is not given within the textbook, that's why I asked here because it was not clear to me, as from my perspective it works the same way even if 2 is omit. –  Nenad Bulatovic Mar 8 '13 at 17:23
    
@nenad - I can't see any reason either. Closest thing I imagine is what Kenneth K mentioned in that the same code may be used to split the first and last name of someone. But, as it is, the 2 seems superfluous from what I can see. –  keyboardP Mar 8 '13 at 17:24

It specifies the maximum number of substrings to return.

Split(Char[], Int32)

Returns a string array that contains the substrings in this instance that are delimited by elements of a specified Unicode character array. A parameter specifies the maximum number of substrings to return.

There are several overloads to the String.Split() method listed here

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OK, but what bothers me is why nbuff = buff.Split(delim); is not used as it will produce same result as nbuff = buff.Split(delim,2); Look like "2" is superfluous, in this context? –  Nenad Bulatovic Mar 8 '13 at 19:52

The 2 indicates the maximum number of strings to return.

See here for full info.

The parameter is called count. Here is the relevant text:

If there are more than count substrings in this instance, the first count minus 1 substrings are returned in the first count minus 1 elements of the return value, and the remaining characters in this instance are returned in the last element of the return value.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but what bothers me is why nbuff = buff.Split(delim); is not used as it will produce same result as nbuff = buff.Split(delim,2); Looks like "2" is superfluous, in this context? –  Nenad Bulatovic Mar 8 '13 at 19:53
    
Yes, I agree. There is no obvious reason in that program to use that particular overload. –  Ann L. Mar 8 '13 at 20:40

The 2 in buff.Split(delim,2) specifies the maximum number of substrings to return. If there were, say, 4 parts to the strings separated by the characters defined in delim, then you'd notice a difference. If you used Split(delim,2), only 2 substrings would be returned.

You can read through this page on MSDN too.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but what bothers me is why nbuff = buff.Split(delim); is not used as it will produce same result as nbuff = buff.Split(delim,2); Looks like "2" is superfluous, in this context? –  Nenad Bulatovic Mar 8 '13 at 19:54

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