Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a big file I can't open:

... more here

<my_element attr1='123'>
... a lot of text and elements here
</my_element>

<my_element attr1='33'>
... a lot of text and elements here
</my_element>

... more here

Update:

I tried this:

#!/usr/bin/ruby
require "rubygems"
require "nokogiri"
require "debugger"
require "awesome_print"

file   = ARGV[0]
reader = Nokogiri::XML::Reader(File.open(file))
reader.each do |node|
  if node.name == "PATDOC"
    debugger
    break
  end
end

but node.attributes returns {}, how could I extract attributes and inner text from elements?

share|improve this question
4  
Use an XML parser instead. It will make your life easier. –  squiguy Mar 8 '13 at 17:05
    
I have a long long file I can't even open, which parser could I use? I am in OS X –  juanpastas Mar 8 '13 at 17:09
    
Define "big" and "long". –  the Tin Man Mar 10 '13 at 16:49
    
about 60 MB compressed. –  juanpastas Mar 10 '13 at 22:20

2 Answers 2

Normally we use Nokogiri to read the entire file and process it as a DOM. I wrapped the sample XML in another node, to make it valid XML, and used a CSS accessor just 'cause they're easier to read:

require 'nokogiri'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOT)
<xml>
  <my_element attr1='123'> a lot of text and elements here </my_element>
  <my_element attr1='33'>  a lot of text and elements here </my_element>
</xml>
EOT

doc.search('my_element').map{ |n|
  [ n['attr1'], n.children.text ]
}

Which looks like:

[
    [0] [
        [0] "123",
        [1] " a lot of text and elements here "
    ],
    [1] [
        [0] "33",
        [1] "  a lot of text and elements here "
    ]
]

If you can't use it that way:

share|improve this answer

Well you can do it with awk... but the recommended way is an XML parser (XPath, whatever). Anyway:

awk 'BEGIN {FS="</*my_element[^>]+>"} {print $2, $3}' INPUTFILE

Note: it's not the perfect solution, e.g. it really depends on your whole input file. What it does is setting your field separater to the tag, and prints the 2nd and 3rd "column" from the file. You might need to modify it.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand this one, it seems to extract all my_element elements –  juanpastas Mar 8 '13 at 17:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.