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I would like to define some generic decorators to check arguments before calling some functions.

Something like:

@checkArguments(types = ['int', 'float'])
def myFunction(thisVarIsAnInt, thisVarIsAFloat)
    ''' Here my code '''
    pass

Side notes:

  1. Type checking is just here to show an example
  2. I'm using Python 2.7 but Python 3.0 whould be interesting too
share|improve this question
4  
As a note, this is generally a really bad idea - it goes against the grain of Python. Type checking is a bad thing in almost all cases. It's also worth noting that it might make more sense to use argument annotations to do this if you are in 3.x. – Latty Mar 8 '13 at 17:35
1  
@Lattyware: Enforcing function arguments and return types is one of examples in the original pep for decorators – J.F. Sebastian Mar 8 '13 at 17:43
    
What is your question? – Robᵩ Mar 8 '13 at 17:44
1  
@Lattyware: it's unpythonic, but if you really want to do it, decorator and argument annotation is the best way to do it. – Lie Ryan Mar 8 '13 at 17:57
1  
I'm not trolling, I'm just making the point that most of the time, if you are type checking, you are doing it wrong, and would be better off doing it another way. It's really common to see people on SO type checking and producing inflexible functions that don't work as well or as efficiently thanks to type checking. – Latty Mar 8 '13 at 18:00
up vote 18 down vote accepted

From the Decorators for Functions and Methods:

def accepts(*types):
    def check_accepts(f):
        assert len(types) == f.func_code.co_argcount
        def new_f(*args, **kwds):
            for (a, t) in zip(args, types):
                assert isinstance(a, t), \
                       "arg %r does not match %s" % (a,t)
            return f(*args, **kwds)
        new_f.func_name = f.func_name
        return new_f
    return check_accepts

Usage:

@accepts(int, (int,float))
def func(arg1, arg2):
    return arg1 * arg2

func(3, 2) # -> 6
func('3', 2) # -> AssertionError: arg '3' does not match <type 'int'>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm using it on some method, but it seems that f has always the value of the last defined function. Do you happen to know where this could come from ? – AsTeR Mar 9 '13 at 13:53
    
@AsTeR: Create a minimal complete code example that reproduces your problem and post it as a new question. – J.F. Sebastian Mar 9 '13 at 21:17
    
I will, my demand was just in case something obvious poped in your mind. – AsTeR Mar 9 '13 at 23:24
2  
I recommend to use this solution, it has good readability if there are many input params. code.activestate.com/recipes/… – Creotiv Jan 14 '14 at 11:25

On Python 3.3, you can use function annotations and inspect:

import inspect

def validate(f):
    def wrapper(*args):
        fname = f.__name__
        fsig = inspect.signature(f)
        vars = ', '.join('{}={}'.format(*pair) for pair in zip(fsig.parameters, args))
        params={k:v for k,v in zip(fsig.parameters, args)}
        print('wrapped call to {}({})'.format(fname, params))
        for k, v in fsig.parameters.items():
            p=params[k]
            msg='call to {}({}): {} failed {})'.format(fname, vars, k, v.annotation.__name__)
            assert v.annotation(params[k]), msg
        ret = f(*args)
        print('  returning {} with annotation: "{}"'.format(ret, fsig.return_annotation))
        return ret
    return wrapper

@validate
def xXy(x: lambda _x: 10<_x<100, y: lambda _y: isinstance(_y,float)) -> ('x times y','in X and Y units'):
    return x*y

xy = xXy(10,3)
print(xy)

If there is a validation error, prints:

AssertionError: call to xXy(x=12, y=3): y failed <lambda>)

If there is not a validation error, prints:

wrapped call to xXy({'y': 3.0, 'x': 12})
  returning 36.0 with annotation: "('x times y', 'in X and Y units')"

You can use a function rather than a lambda to get a name in the assertion failure.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks interesting but really tough to understand at first glance. I'll give a look when I'll be less tired. – AsTeR Mar 8 '13 at 17:46
    
Very interesting, I absolutely love it – Arsham Apr 13 '14 at 18:03

To enforce string arguments to a parser that would throw cryptic errors when provided with non-string input, I wrote the following, which tries to avoid allocation and function calls:

from functools import wraps

def argtype(**decls):
    """Decorator to check argument types.

    Usage:

    @argtype(name=str, text=str)
    def parse_rule(name, text): ...
    """

    def decorator(func):
        code = func.func_code
        fname = func.func_name
        names = code.co_varnames[:code.co_argcount]

        @wraps(func)
        def decorated(*args,**kwargs):
            for argname, argtype in decls.iteritems():
                try:
                    argval = args[names.index(argname)]
                except ValueError:
                    argval = kwargs.get(argname)
                if argval is None:
                    raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s' is null"
                                    % (fname, argname))
                if not isinstance(argval, argtype):
                    raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s': type is %s, must be %s"
                                    % (fname, argname, type(argval), argtype))
            return func(*args,**kwargs)
        return decorated

    return decorator
share|improve this answer
    
I ended up using this one: relatively simple, uses only standard library, and it works with variable number of *args and **kwargs. Only caveat is that func_code was renamed to __code__ in Python 3, I don't know if there's a cross-version way to do this. – astrojuanlu Jul 1 '15 at 19:19

Here is some sample code to achieve features like the one asked

class checkArguments:
    def __init__(self, types=[]):
        ''' Call with your decorator parameters '''
        self._types = types

    def __call__(self, function):
        '''
        Call with the function to call as an argument (when the decorator 
        is parsed not at function call
        '''
        def onFunctionCall(*args, **kwargs):
            ''' 
            Actual function called when you call yours this is the decorator.
            Its arguments are those of the function
            '''
            if len(self._types) != 0:
                self._checkTypes(args, self._types)
            # actual function call
            return function(*args, **kwargs) 

        def _checkTypes(vars, types):
            '''
            I won't implement it right ?
            '''
            pass


'''
usage as asked
'''
@checkArguments(types = ['int', 'float'])
def myFunction(thisVarIsAnInt, thisVarIsAFloat)
    ''' Here my code '''
    pass

myFunction(1, '1')   # --> should fail
myFunction(1, 1.2)   # --> should pass
share|improve this answer
    
You don't check parameters. Parameters are just identifiers. You check the objects received as arguments by the function. – eyquem Mar 8 '13 at 17:37
    
@eyquem I don't get your point – AsTeR Mar 8 '13 at 17:55
    
@AsTeR I think he's trying to say it should be called check_arguments() instead. – Latty Mar 8 '13 at 18:02
    
@Lattyware oh ... right. Arguments is more precise indeed ! – AsTeR Mar 8 '13 at 18:05
1  
@AsTeR That's a point of nomenclature. (docs.python.org/2/faq/…) A lot of pepole do a mess concerning these terms and it's a pity because it has fundamentally to do with the data model of Python. And one can't understand Python without understanding its data model – eyquem Mar 8 '13 at 18:09

I have a slightly improved version of @jbouwmans sollution, using python decorator module, which makes the decorator fully transparent and keeps not only signature but also docstrings in place and might be the most elegant way of using decorators

from decorator import decorator

def check_args(**decls):
    """Decorator to check argument types.

    Usage:

    @check_args(name=str, text=str)
    def parse_rule(name, text): ...
    """
    @decorator
    def wrapper(func, *args, **kwargs):
        code = func.func_code
        fname = func.func_name
        names = code.co_varnames[:code.co_argcount]
        for argname, argtype in decls.iteritems():
            try:
                argval = args[names.index(argname)]
            except IndexError:
                argval = kwargs.get(argname)
            if argval is None:
                raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s' is null"
                            % (fname, argname))
            if not isinstance(argval, argtype):
                raise TypeError("%s(...): arg '%s': type is %s, must be %s"
                            % (fname, argname, type(argval), argtype))
    return func(*args, **kwargs)
return wrapper
share|improve this answer

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