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In most of my projects I use nHibernate + Fluent mapping and recently I've started to play around with Dapper to see if I can move read operations to it.

I follow DDD approach so my domain entities do not have any public setters. For example:

public class User
{
    private int _id;
    private string _name;
    private IList<Car> _carList;

    protected User(){} // Fluent Mapping

    public User(string id, string name)
    {
        // validation 
        // ...
        _id = id;
        _name = name;
    }

    public int Id{ get {return _id;} }
    public string Name { get {return _name;} }
    public IList<Car> CarList { get {return _carList;}}         
}

public class Car
{
    private int _id;
    private string _brand;

    protected Car(){} // Fluent Mapping

    public Car(string id, string brand)
    {
        // validation 
        // ...
        _id = id;
        _brand= brand;
    }

    public int Id{ get {return _id;} }
    public string Brand { get {return _brand;} }
}

With Fluent nHibernate I'm able to reveal members for mapping:

Id(Reveal.Member<User>("_id")).Column("id");
Map(Reveal.Member<User>("_name")).Column("name");

Is there a way to map my domain entities with Dapper? If so, how?

share|improve this question
1  
Note that the IList<Car> exposed by the User class, is a DDD smell just like a setter: you should expose an IEnumerable<Car> instead, since all operations on an aggregate's state should be handled via commands sent to it. – Giacomo Tesio Mar 8 '13 at 22:30
up vote 6 down vote accepted

One option is to create a separate set of persistence classes to work with Dapper; for example: UserRecord and CarRecord. The record classes will match db table and will be encapsulate within persistence module. Dapper queries will run against this classes and then you can have a separate persistence factory which will assemble the domain entities and return them back to the client.

Small example:

        var carRecord = DbConnection.Query<CarRecord>("select * from cars where id = @id", new {id = 1});
        var carEntity = CarFactory.Build(carRecord);

This creates a nice separation and provides flexibility.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I can confirm that this solution works very well for custom repositories. – Giacomo Tesio Mar 8 '13 at 22:34
    
I thought about this solution but since this makes me write a lot more code I was wondering if there is any alternative. Thanks for your comments. – R2D2 Mar 12 '13 at 13:46
    
@R2D2: I wonder, how did you implement? I know this quite a old post but am stuck in a similar situation and ended up on this post while searching. – Coder Absolute Jan 6 at 15:23
    
@CoderAbsolute - by creating factories as in the answer given. However, it generates a lot of extra work. Currently I 'm doing more and more of CQRS where I use nHibernate for entities without public setters and Dapper.NET for DTOs in quering. – R2D2 Jan 7 at 10:24
    
@R2D2: Thanks for letting me know. I have also ended up using the CQRS approach too! It looks like cleanest... – Coder Absolute Jan 8 at 7:18

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