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I have an n x m matrix consisting of non-negative integers. For example:

2 3 4 7 1
1 5 2 6 2
4 3 4 2 1
2 1 2 4 1
3 1 3 4 1
2 1 4 3 2
6 9 1 6 4

"Dropping a bomb" decreases by one the number of the target cell and all eight of its neighbours, to a minimum of zero.

x x x 
x X x
x x x

What is an algorithm that would determine the minimum number of bombs required to reduce all the cells to zero?

B Option (Due to me not being a careful reader)

Actually the first version of problem is not the one I'm seeking answer for. I didn't carefully read whole task, there's additional constraints, let us say:

What about simple problem, when sequence in row must be non-increasing:

8 7 6 6 5 is possible input sequence

7 8 5 5 2 is not possible since 7 -> 8 growing in a sequence.

Maybe finding answer for "easier" case would help in finding solution for harder one.

PS: I believe that when we have several same situations require minimum bombs to clear upper line, we choose one that use most bombs on "left side" of the row. Still any proof that might be correct?

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4  
Well I just find ot that some fields can be skipped like in example 2 3 1 5 Droping it on 2,3,1 is pointless, because dropping on them cause some subset damage which we can cause by dropping on 5. But can't find how to make it work globally (if it's correct way). Clearing 2 require use 2 bombs dropped on any of neighbour and 5 is containing other sets of damage. But then I don't know what to do later on since when you rewrite it (after decreasing), then you have two choice (there isn't one uber-set of damage). –  abc Mar 8 '13 at 17:58
22  
Is this NP-hard by any chance? It looks to be a variant of the Maximum Coverage Problem. –  Mysticial Mar 8 '13 at 18:26
14  
+1 for giving me something interesting to think about –  Nick Mitchinson Mar 8 '13 at 18:49
3  
@Kostek, great problem! Please post the link. –  Colonel Panic Mar 8 '13 at 19:29
5  
perhaps you should clarify, you said the question is: what's the minimum amount of bombs required to clean the board? Does this means that it is not necessarily needed to find an actual bombing pattern, but just the minimal number of bombs? –  Lie Ryan Mar 8 '13 at 21:25

33 Answers 33

This was an answer to the first asked question. I hadn't noticed that he changed the parameters.

Create a list of all targets. Assign a value to the target based on the number of positive values impacted by a drop (itself, and all neighbors). Highest value would be a nine.

Sort the targets by the number of targets impacted (Descending), with a secondary descending sort on the sum of each impacted target.

Drop a bomb on the highest ranked target, then re-calculate targets and repeat until all target values are zero.

Agreed, this is not always the most optimal. For example,

100011
011100
011100
011100
000000
100011

This approach would take 5 bombs to clear. Optimally, though, you could do it in 4. Still, pretty darn close and there is no backtracking. For most situations it will be optimal, or very close.

Using the original problem numbers, this approach solves in 28 bombs.

Adding code to demonstrate this approach (using a form with a button):

         private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        int[,] matrix = new int[10, 10] {{5, 20, 7, 1, 9, 8, 19, 16, 11, 3}, 
                                         {17, 8, 15, 17, 12, 4, 5, 16, 8, 18},
                                         { 4, 19, 12, 11, 9, 7, 4, 15, 14, 6},
                                         { 17, 20, 4, 9, 19, 8, 17, 2, 10, 8},
                                         { 3, 9, 10, 13, 8, 9, 12, 12, 6, 18}, 
                                         {16, 16, 2, 10, 7, 12, 17, 11, 4, 15},
                                         { 11, 1, 15, 1, 5, 11, 3, 12, 8, 3},
                                         { 7, 11, 16, 19, 17, 11, 20, 2, 5, 19},
                                         { 5, 18, 2, 17, 7, 14, 19, 11, 1, 6},
                                         { 13, 20, 8, 4, 15, 10, 19, 5, 11, 12}};


        int value = 0;
        List<Target> Targets = GetTargets(matrix);
        while (Targets.Count > 0)
        {
            BombTarget(ref matrix, Targets[0]);
            value += 1;
            Targets = GetTargets(matrix);
        }
        Console.WriteLine( value);
        MessageBox.Show("done: " + value);
    }

    private static void BombTarget(ref int[,] matrix, Target t)
    {
        for (int a = t.x - 1; a <= t.x + 1; a++)
        {
            for (int b = t.y - 1; b <= t.y + 1; b++)
            {
                if (a >= 0 && a <= matrix.GetUpperBound(0))
                {
                    if (b >= 0 && b <= matrix.GetUpperBound(1))
                    {
                        if (matrix[a, b] > 0)
                        {
                            matrix[a, b] -= 1;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Dropped bomb on " + t.x + "," + t.y);
    }

    private static List<Target> GetTargets(int[,] matrix)
    {
        List<Target> Targets = new List<Target>();
        int width = matrix.GetUpperBound(0);
        int height = matrix.GetUpperBound(1);
        for (int x = 0; x <= width; x++)
        {
            for (int y = 0; y <= height; y++)
            {
                Target t = new Target();
                t.x = x;
                t.y = y;
                SetTargetValue(matrix, ref t);
                if (t.value > 0) Targets.Add(t);
            }
        }
        Targets = Targets.OrderByDescending(x => x.value).ThenByDescending( x => x.sum).ToList();
        return Targets;
    }

    private static void SetTargetValue(int[,] matrix, ref Target t)
    {
        for (int a = t.x - 1; a <= t.x + 1; a++)
        {
            for (int b = t.y - 1; b <= t.y + 1; b++)
            {
                if (a >= 0 && a <= matrix.GetUpperBound(0))
                {
                    if (b >= 0 && b <= matrix.GetUpperBound(1))
                    {
                        if (matrix[ a, b] > 0)
                        {
                            t.value += 1;
                            t.sum += matrix[a,b];
                        }

                    }
                }
            }
        }

    }

A class you will need:

        class Target
    {
        public int value;
        public int sum;
        public int x;
        public int y;
    }
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1  
Not optimal. Counterexample: 09090 This approach requires 18 bombs. It can be done in 9. –  Mysticial Mar 9 '13 at 18:54
1  
@AnthonyQueen: this doesn't work. please see chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/message/8224273#8224273 for my counterexample. –  nneonneo Mar 12 '13 at 17:32

The slowest but simplest and error free algorithm is generate and test all valid possibilities. for this case is very simple (because result is independent on the order of bomb placement).

  1. create funct which N times apply bomp
  2. create loop for all bompb-placement/bomb-count posibilities (stop when matrix==0)
  3. remember always the best solution.
  4. at the end of loop you have the best solution
    • not only count of bombs, but also their placement

code can look like this:

void copy(int **A,int **B,int m,int n)
    {
    for (int i=0;i<m;i++)
     for (int j=0;i<n;j++)
       A[i][j]=B[i][j];
    }

bool is_zero(int **M,int m,int n)
    {
    for (int i=0;i<m;i++)
     for (int j=0;i<n;j++)
      if (M[i][j]) return 0;
    return 1;
    }

void drop_bomb(int **M,int m,int n,int i,int j,int N)
    {
    int ii,jj;
    ii=i-1; jj=j-1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i-1; jj=j  ; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i-1; jj=j+1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i  ; jj=j-1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i  ; jj=j  ; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i  ; jj=j+1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i+1; jj=j-1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i+1; jj=j  ; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    ii=i+1; jj=j+1; if ((ii>=0)&&(ii<m)&&(jj>=0)&&(jj<n)&&(M[ii][jj])) { M[ii][jj]-=N; if (M[ii][jj]<0) M[ii][jj]=0; }
    }

void solve_problem(int **M,int m,int n)
    {
    int i,j,k,max=0;
    // you probably will need to allocate matrices P,TP,TM yourself instead of this:
    int P[m][n],min;             // solution: placement,min bomb count
    int TM[m][n],TP[m][n],cnt;   // temp
    for (i=0;i<m;i++)            // max count of bomb necessary to test
     for (j=0;j<n;j++)
      if (max<M[i][j]) max=M[i][j];
    for (i=0;i<m;i++)            // reset solution
     for (j=0;j<n;j++)
      P[i][j]=max;
    min=m*n*max; 
        copy(TP,P,m,n); cnt=min;

    for (;;)  // generate all possibilities
        {
        copy(TM,M,m,n);
        for (i=0;i<m;i++)   // test solution
         for (j=0;j<n;j++)
          drop_bomb(TM,m,n,TP[i][j]);
        if (is_zero(TM,m,n))// is solution
         if (min>cnt)       // is better solution -> store it
            {
            copy(P,TP,m,n); 
            min=cnt;    
            }
        // go to next possibility
        for (i=0,j=0;;)
            {
            TP[i][j]--;
            if (TP[i][j]>=0) break;
            TP[i][j]=max;
                 i++; if (i<m) break;
            i=0; j++; if (j<n) break;
            break;
            }
        if (is_zero(TP,m,n)) break;
        }
    //result is in P,min
    }

this can be optimized in lot of ways,... simplest is to reset solution with M matrix, but you need change the max value and also the TP[][] decrement code

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Several answers so far give exponential time, some involve dynamic programming. I doubt if those are necessary.

My solution is O(mnS) where m, n are dimensions of the board, S is the sum of all integers. The idea is rather bruteforce: find the location that can kill the most each time and terminate at 0.

It gives 28 moves for the board given, and also prints out the board after each drop.

Complete, self-explanatory code:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class BombMinDrops {

    private static final int[][] BOARD = {{2,3,4,7,1}, {1,5,2,6,2}, {4,3,4,2,1}, {2,1,2,4,1}, {3,1,3,4,1}, {2,1,4,3,2}, {6,9,1,6,4}};
    private static final int ROWS = BOARD.length;
    private static final int COLS = BOARD[0].length;
    private static int remaining = 0;
    private static int dropCount = 0;
    static {
        for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++) {
                remaining = remaining + BOARD[i][j];
            }
        }
    }

    private static class Point {
        int x, y;
        int kills;

        Point(int x, int y, int kills) {
            this.x = x;
            this.y = y;
            this.kills = kills;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return dropCount + "th drop at [" + x + ", " + y + "] , killed " + kills;
        }
    }

    private static int countPossibleKills(int x, int y) {
        int count = 0;
        for (int row = x - 1; row <= x + 1; row++) {
            for (int col = y - 1; col <= y + 1; col++) {
                try {
                    if (BOARD[row][col] > 0) count++;
                } catch (ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {/*ignore*/}
            }
        }

        return count;
    }

    private static void drop(Point here) {
        for (int row = here.x - 1; row <= here.x + 1; row++) {
            for (int col = here.y - 1; col <= here.y + 1; col++) {
                try {
                    if (BOARD[row][col] > 0) BOARD[row][col]--;
                } catch (ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException ex) {/*ignore*/}
            }
        }

        dropCount++;
        remaining = remaining - here.kills;
        print(here);
    }

    public static void solve() {
        while (remaining > 0) {
            Point dropWithMaxKills = new Point(-1, -1, -1);
            for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++) {
                for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++) {
                    int possibleKills = countPossibleKills(i, j);
                    if (possibleKills > dropWithMaxKills.kills) {
                        dropWithMaxKills = new Point(i, j, possibleKills);
                    }
                }
            }

            drop(dropWithMaxKills);
        }

        System.out.println("Total dropped: " + dropCount);
    }

    private static void print(Point drop) {
        System.out.println(drop.toString());
        for (int[] row : BOARD) {
            System.out.println(Arrays.toString(row));
        }

        System.out.println();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        solve();
    }

}
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protected by arshajii Mar 18 '13 at 0:54

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