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I've seen several examples of people taking a string and using it as Json. I want to read from a file with json in it, and use that as the body of my request. What would be the most efficient way to do this?

Thanks so much for the help. My final solution, using the groovy console and reading from a .json file, looks like this:

@Grab(group='org.apache.httpcomponents', module='httpclient', version='4.2.3')
@Grab(group='org.apache.httpcomponents', module='httpcore', version='4.2.3')
@Grab(group='org.apache.commons', module='commons-io', version='1.3.2')
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpPost
import org.apache.http.HttpResponse
import org.apache.http.HttpEntity
import org.apache.http.entity.StringEntity
import org.apache.http.util.EntityUtils
import org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils

String json = IOUtils.toString(new FileInputStream("C:\\MyHome\\example.json"));

DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost("http://api/location/send");
httpPost.addHeader("content-type", "application/json");
httpPost.setEntity(new StringEntity(json));
HttpResponse response2 = httpclient.execute(httpPost);

try {
    System.out.println(response2.getStatusLine());
    HttpEntity entity2 = response2.getEntity();
    // do something useful with the response body
    // and ensure it is fully consumed
    EntityUtils.consume(entity2);
} finally {
    httpPost.releaseConnection();
}

This is a great quick sanity check for me, a good way to prototype quickly for the bigger picture of what I'm trying to do. Thanks again.

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1  
Is the text in your file not a String? The same examples you see of people using Strings are really no different. –  BrandonV Mar 8 '13 at 18:43
    
The examples I've looked at have people sticking strings directly into the class, complete with escaped \" to make it look like a valid piece of json. I have a file with a string that looks something like {"key":"value"} (although much bigger). I just want to pull that from the file and use that. –  City17Mogul Mar 8 '13 at 18:52
    
If you can use third party libraries take a look at IOUtils from Apache Commons IO. It trivializes tasks like these. One liner - String data = IOUtils.toString(new FileInputStream("fileName")); –  Perception Mar 8 '13 at 18:52
    
@Perception Thanks for this, incorporating this into my solution –  City17Mogul Mar 11 '13 at 18:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use Apache HttpComponents. Here's a small sample you can try out in the GroovyConsole that comes with Groovy. I use that as it's the simplest way to prototype something quickly because of the auto loading of library jars with Grape (that's what the @Grab annotation does). Also, in the GroovyConsole, there's no need to create a project. You don't need to be using Groovy either, though I normally would.

Note that the code below is a modified POST example taken from the HttpClient Quick Start. Also, note that HttpComponents/HttpClient is a newer project that supersedes the older HttpClient from Apache (just clearing this up in case you Google around and see HttpClient without the HttpComponents). The host (posttestserver.com) I used is just a test server that will accept an Http request and return a response if everything is OK.

@Grab(group='org.apache.httpcomponents', module='httpclient', version='4.2.3')
@Grab(group='org.apache.httpcomponents', module='httpcore', version='4.2.3')
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpPost
import org.apache.http.HttpResponse
import org.apache.http.HttpEntity
import org.apache.http.entity.StringEntity
import org.apache.http.util.EntityUtils


String json = "{foo: 123, bar: \"hello\"}";

DefaultHttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost("http://posttestserver.com/post.php");
httpPost.setEntity(new StringEntity(json));
HttpResponse response2 = httpclient.execute(httpPost);

try {
    System.out.println(response2.getStatusLine());
    HttpEntity entity2 = response2.getEntity();
    // do something useful with the response body
    // and ensure it is fully consumed
    EntityUtils.consume(entity2);
} finally {
    httpPost.releaseConnection();
}
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