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I have a question in Python which I have created an answer for it, but I am trying to achieve better efficiency for the answer.

I cant use functions, recursions, only basic stuff..

The question is:

For the number 3 power 2209 there are 1000 digits. find 12 sequential numbers that it's sum is the maximal.

For example: 5 power 36 equals 14551915228366851806640625. The 12 sequential numbers that product the maximal sum are 836685180664.

sumOfBig=0
Big=""
x=5**36
strp=str(x)
s=len(strp)
print(x)
print()
for i in range(s-11):
    new=strp[i:i+12]
    l=0
    for j in new:
        l=l+int(j)
    print(i)
    print(new)
    print(l)
    print()
    if l>sumOfBig:
        sumOfBig=l
        Big=new
print(Big)
print(sumOfBig)

Do you guys have any ideas for better code?

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closed as not a real question by bernie, Emil, Troy Alford, tc., Steven Penny Mar 9 '13 at 0:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

well, you can have more efficient way of summing the 12 sequential numbers. you can keep track of 12 sequential numbers, pop/subtract the oldest(leftmost) one from the subset's sum, push/add the newest(rightmost) one.

also, sum(iterable) is a built-in function.

my new code with only basic list and for-loop:

x = 5 ** 36
num_list = [int(i) for i in str(x)]
sumOfBig = last_sum = sum(num_list[:12])
maximal_index = 0

for i, n in enumerate(num_list[12:]):
   last_sum = last_sum + n - num_list[i]
   if last_sum > sumOfBig:
      maximal_index = i+1
      sumOfBig = last_sum


print num_list[maximal_index:maximal_index+12] #[8, 3, 6, 6, 8, 5, 1, 8, 0, 6, 6, 4]
share|improve this answer
x = 5**36
str_x = [int(i) for i in str(x)]


curBestIndex = 0
curBestSum = sum(str_x[:12])
curSum = curBestSum

for i in range(len(str_x) - 11):
    delta = str_x[i + 11] - str_x[i]
    curSum += delta
    if curSum > curBestSum:
        curBestSum = curSum
        curBestIndex = i

big = str(x)[curBestIndex : curBestIndex + 12]
print(big)
print(curBestSum)
share|improve this answer
    
nice. you can use str_x = '0' + str_x + '0', and initialize curSum to -1 –  shx2 Mar 8 '13 at 18:57
    
If only I work with a string of length > 10. I let the answer for numbers like '456' be 4+5+6. –  Harold Mar 8 '13 at 18:59
    
If you already have a best sum, shouldn't you use this range: range(1, len(str_x) - 12)? And isn't this right: delta = str_x[i + 12] - str_x[i]? Your code gives the wrong answer for the sample given: >>> big = str(x)[curBestIndex : curBestIndex + 12] >>> print(big) 283668518066 . –  hughdbrown Mar 8 '13 at 19:33

Here's a method that helps factor out all the occurrences of 11/12, etc.

MAX_LENGTH = 12
x = 5 ** 36

sequence = []
d = []

for i in str(x):
    d.append(int(i))
    if len(d) > MAX_LENGTH:
        d.pop(0)
    if sum(d) >= sum(sequence):
        sequence = list(d)

print sequence, sum(sequence)

RETURNS:

>>> 
[8, 3, 6, 6, 8, 5, 1, 8, 0, 6, 6, 4] 61

In accordance with the Zen of Python, "Readability Counts", and I think that single line actions presented here are much more straightforward than slicing operations, especially when considering off-by-one mistakes that come from multiple instances of hardcoding the sequence length.

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