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I'm trying to write a method that accepts a generic input and returns null if the input is default and an XElement otherwise.

Btw, I'm pretty green at generic methods, and apparently at google-fu.

Here's what I have so far:

public static class ConversionClass<T>
{
    public static XElement newXElementOrNull<T>(string name, T val)
    {
        if ((T.type == "String") && (val == String.Empty))
        {
            return null;
        }

        if (val == default(T))
        {
            return null;
        }
        else
        {
            return new XElement(name, val);
        }
    }
}

For some reason, C# does not like this.

It balks on the method signature (newXElementOrNull) saying:

Type parameter 'T' has the same name as the type parameter from outer type 'AddXMLTest.Converter'

And it highlights the T in the angled brackets and the T in the parameter.

To make matters worse it doesn't like the val == default(T) part because it says Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'.

What am I doing wrong?

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closed as too localized by Peter Ritchie, PaRiMaL RaJ, Chains, Mario Sannum, TemplateRex Mar 8 '13 at 20:41

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You're missing so much code from this example to figure out what's really wrong here. For example val == default(T) isn't valid the way you have written the example. Also, clearly you have an outer type that uses T in a type parameter as well, but you haven't provided that example code. – Peter Ritchie Mar 8 '13 at 19:04
1  
FYI the naming convention for all non-private methods is (edit: not camelCase) PascalCase – George Mauer Mar 8 '13 at 19:05
    
Also, if ((T.type == "String") && (val == String.Empty)) is not valid. Please provide a short but complete example that reproduces the problem. – Peter Ritchie Mar 8 '13 at 19:06
    
Supporting documentation for 2 of the answers (at the time of writing) can be found on MSDN – BinaryTox1n Mar 8 '13 at 19:07
    
@GeorgeMauer - it's spelled camelCase but that rule does not apply to methods. This is not Java. – Henk Holterman Mar 8 '13 at 19:07

Apparently this method is inside a class that already specifies <T>. That means that you can omit this type parameter, methods of a generic class are automatically generic too.

I would expect T.type to cause errors as well but it depends on the type-constraints on the outer class. To get a full answer, post the outer definition (not all members) of that class.

it doesn't like the val == default(T)

That is most likely a follow-up error of the first.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd +1 you if I could my friend - but I'm out of votes. I guess we both had the same thought here. It's nice when you're answer is confirmed by people like you! – Mike Perrenoud Mar 8 '13 at 19:04

Type parameter 'T' has the same name as the type parameter from outer type 'AddXMLTest.Converter'

So the class outside of this method (not shown) must be using <T> as well. You won't be able to do that. Name it (on the method that is) something like <K>.

To make matters worse it doesn't like the val == default(T) part because it says Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'.

This should be resolved when you stop using <T> and change it so something like default(K).

Further, I'm pretty sure that this T.type isn't going to compile. I'm pretty sure that evaluation should be something like:

if ((val is typeof(string) && string.IsNullOrEmpty(val))
share|improve this answer
2  
the is parameter is for instances not types T is typeof(string) would not work – George Mauer Mar 8 '13 at 19:07
    
@GeorgeMauer, sorry. Right you are, thanks a lot, it's fixed! – Mike Perrenoud Mar 8 '13 at 19:08
1  
In that case we have the issue that if val is null T might be a string but this will not trigger since null is String == false. Pretty much the is operator is not quite the correct tool for this. You probably want to do a direct comparison on types like in my answer or check type1.IsAssignableFrom(type2) – George Mauer Mar 8 '13 at 19:12
    
@GeorgeMauer, very good point. So that would look like T.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(string)) right? – Mike Perrenoud Mar 8 '13 at 19:25
    
Other way around - typeof(String).IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T)) it makes perfect sense when you read it aloud but for some reason everyone (myself included) always gets it backwards. That being said, String is a sealed class and not possible to inherit from so checking IsAssignableFrom is overkill. – George Mauer Mar 8 '13 at 19:32

You can no sooner do T.type than you can do String.type or MyClass.type

What you're looking for is something like

typeof(T) == typeof(String)
share|improve this answer

There are two invalid things which are T.type == "String" && val == String.Empty and val == default(T). What about:

public static XElement newXElementOrNull<T>( string name, T val ) {
   if ( typeof(T) == typeof(String) && val.ToString() == String.Empty ) {
      return null;
   }

   if ( EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals( val, default( T ) ) ) {
      return null;
   }
   else {
      return new XElement( name, val );
   }
}
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