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I have two classes that refer to each other:

class B{
  A obj;
  B(A obj){
    this.obj=obj;
  }
  void display(){
    System.out.println(obj.data);//using data member of A class
  }
}

class A{
  int data=10;

  A(){
   B b =new B(new A());  //  THIS LINE GENERATES AN ERROR
   b.display();
  }
  public static void main(String args[]){
   A a=new A();
  }
}

If I change the offending line to read

   B b =new B(this);

then it works. I think that the two lines do the same thing. Why does one work and not the other?

Also, the compiler error from the first version reads

A.<init><A.java:15>

What does this mean?

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2  
what is your question exactly? You think that this should result in a compile / runtime error? This is valid code –  75inchpianist Mar 8 '13 at 19:03
    
new A() always creates a new object, a new reference to the class and as well calls the constructor, in this case this loops infinite, instead if you pass "this" - it references to current object. To simplify -new A() - creating a new object , this not creating a new object using current object –  din Mar 8 '13 at 19:15
1  
Best edit ever @Nathaniel ! –  Simon Mar 8 '13 at 19:32

1 Answer 1

By calling new A() inside A() you produce an infinite loop invoking the constructor. This is the error.

I'll explain to you in more detail: When you pass this into the new B(...) constructor, you are passing a reference to the newly constructed object of class A whose constructor you are currently inside of. This is OK, because it doesn't cause any further action beyond constructing a new B.

When you replace it with new A(), you must first produce a new instance of class A. This is not a problem yet. The problem is that when you get inside constructor A() { ... }, everything begins again: you'll get to the line B b =new B(new A()); and will again invoked the A constructor which will end up back at this line again and so until you receive a StackOverflowError.

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1  
Not exactly an ideal introduction to recursion, amirite? –  bernie Mar 8 '13 at 19:03
    
@bernie Well... :) –  Andremoniy Mar 8 '13 at 19:04
1  
Stack overflow :p –  din Mar 8 '13 at 19:09

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