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I'm attempting to write a little javascript but have almost no experience in this area.

I've read posts suggesting that <script> blocks inside of <head> are guaranteed to run before those in <body>, but I'm seeing exactly the opposite behaviour. Could someone explain to me why I'm seeing this?

Here is my simple test page:

<html>
  <head>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    var test_msg;
    function initMap() {
      test_msg = "This is a test";
      window.alert('initMap: ' + test_msg);
    }
    </script>
  </head>
  <body onload="initMap()">
    <script type="text/javascript">
      window.alert('blargo: ' + test_msg);
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

When I load this (in either Firefox or IE) I see 2 message boxes: #1: "blargo: undefined", and #2: "initMap: this is a test", suggesting the later script is being executed first.

Thanks for any help,
gs.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your first script is being executed first... but all it does is create the function and variable.

You're then invoking the function here:

<body onload="initMap()">

....which ensures that the function will not be invoked until all the document resources have loaded.


So the overall order of code execution is:

   // first script
var test_msg;
function initMap() {
   test_msg = "This is a test";
   window.alert('initMap: ' + test_msg);
}


   // second script
window.alert('blargo: ' + test_msg);


   // function call via window.onload
initMap();
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Thanks everyone for your speedy replies. It seemed so counter-intuitive before but now I get it. :) –  Guy Smiley Mar 8 '13 at 19:25

Thing is that your function initMap is called when the body is loaded (body onload='...') but the body is only loaded entirely when your last script is loaded and thus executed. You are confusing loading the javascript and executing it.

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