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i want to get the first character of a string (char[]) in C.

unsigned int N;
unsigned int F;
unsigned int M;
char C;
int main (int argc, char *argv[]){
    if (argc!=5){
        printf("Invalid number of arguments! (5 expected)\n");
        exit(-1);
    }
    N = atoi(argv [1]);
    F = atoi(argv [2]);
    M = atoi(argv [3]);
    C = (char) argv[4]; //this way gives a wrong char value to variable C

The code above gives me the warning: cast to pointer from integer of different size.

EDIT: as pointed in comments, argv is char *[], not char[].

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Use the dereferencing operator? –  Richard J. Ross III Mar 8 '13 at 19:11
2  
There's no char[] variable in your program. C is char, and argv is char*[]. –  Barmar Mar 8 '13 at 19:11
    
@qPCR4vir argv[0] is the name of the program, and it's a string, not a char. –  Barmar Mar 8 '13 at 19:13
    
C=argv[4][0]; ...? –  qPCR4vir Mar 8 '13 at 19:13
    
I'm editing it right now to correct that it's a char*[]. @qPCR4vir C=argv[4][0] is a good solution too, thanks –  ghostdance Mar 8 '13 at 19:31
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two main ways to do this. The first is to simply dereference the pointer.

C = *argv[4];

You can also do it via array subscript, which implicitly adds an offset to the pointer before dereferencing it.

Be sure to check whether it's null first, and so on. In general, you need to be careful when dealing with pointers.

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I guess the argc != 5 test counts as checking the validity in this case. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 8 '13 at 19:23
    
Really thanks. And yes, the argc != 5 checks if it's null. –  ghostdance Mar 8 '13 at 19:37
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argv[4] is a char array. You need to dereference that array to obtain a single element from it

C = *(argv[4]);
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