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I'm currently translating some ActionScript to C#. Most of the stuff is understandable and can be easily reproduced/improved while translating it to C#. I came over a utils class while following the flow of code, which provides basic functionalities. A lot of it is obsoloete, so I threw out most of the utility functions and replaced them with more proper methods already provided by the .NET framework.

Here an example:

// ActionScript
public static function encode(_arg1:String):String{
    var _local2:ByteArray = new ByteArray();
    _local2.writeUTFBytes(_arg1);
    return (encodeByteArray(_local2));
}

// Corresponding C#
public static string encode(string _arg1) {
    return Convert.ToBase64String(System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(_arg1));
}

For clarity I just left the parameters names as is, though the naming is awful. I am quite unfamiliar with C#-low-level stuff like enumerating through byte arrays and streams properly, because I'm usually not in touch with that part of C# on my daily work. If I need some tool, I usually find it already implemented in .NET or search the web for great snippets.

The author makes my head ache with this function though. The namings are horribly chosen:

private static const BASE64_CHARS:String = 
    "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/=";

public static function encodeByteArray(_arg1:ByteArray):String{
    var _local3:Array;
    var _local5:uint;
    var _local6:uint;
    var _local7:uint;
    var _local2 = "";
    var _local4:Array = new Array(4);
    _arg1.position = 0;
    while (_arg1.bytesAvailable > 0) {
        _local3 = new Array();
        _local5 = 0;
        while ((((_local5 < 3)) && ((_arg1.bytesAvailable > 0)))) {
            _local3[_local5] = _arg1.readUnsignedByte();
            _local5++;
        };
        _local4[0] = ((_local3[0] & 252) >> 2);
        _local4[1] = (((_local3[0] & 3) << 4) | (_local3[1] >> 4));
        _local4[2] = (((_local3[1] & 15) << 2) | (_local3[2] >> 6));
        _local4[3] = (_local3[2] & 63);
        _local6 = _local3.length;
        while (_local6 < 3) {
            _local4[(_local6 + 1)] = 64;
            _local6++;
        };
        _local7 = 0;
        while (_local7 < _local4.length) {
            _local2 = (_local2 + BASE64_CHARS.charAt(_local4[_local7]));
            _local7++;
        };
    };
    return (_local2);
}

That ought to be easier in .NET! My guess is that this decodes data from byte[] into a Base64 string. If you paid attention you see that the first function I've mentioned uses this function. Is this one because of the mentioned C# implementation obsolete either? Or is my C# implementation wrong? If it I'd need a clue, not a whole implementation. :)

Here my last question: the author declared ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/= as Base64 chars. Wtf? This is 65! Wikipedia tells me Base64 does not contain the character =. What if old data already has been encoded with that "wrong" char set? Would I need to decode it with the corresponding wrong, also badly written, decode method and encode it properly then with a .NET implementation?

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3  
recommend taking some of his existing data and what his current code produces to build a set of unit tests up that you can use to validate your implementation (assuming you can execute his action script) including something to capture this '=' question. –  Mikeb Mar 8 '13 at 19:22
1  
Humans can't write code like that. Must be some obfuscation tool. –  J0HN Mar 8 '13 at 19:28
    
@Mikeb: I have to admit that I've just guessed that this is ActionScript. I'm not familiar with the IDE of Adobe and just read and navigate through the code in Notepad++. I derive the meaning of the code from knowing a little JS. –  ebeeb Mar 8 '13 at 19:28
    
@J0HN: I can't tell you whether or not the code I received was obfuscated and decompiled. I just got the code. Does this matter? Though my guess is, that the code might have been optimized (compression?). Obfuscated code, which can be read (mostly^^) by humans isn't really obfuscated, is it? –  ebeeb Mar 8 '13 at 19:34
3  
The function you are looking at is decompiled code here is a link to the original source code.google.com/p/as3crypto/source/browse/trunk/as3crypto/src/… Why do I get the feeling you are stealing someones app. –  The_asMan Mar 8 '13 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that whatever language this in treats _arg1 as a forward only read stream, this is taking 3 bytes at a time from the input string,

    while ((((_local5 < 3)) && ((_arg1.bytesAvailable > 0)))) {
        _local3[_local5] = _arg1.readUnsignedByte();
        _local5++;
    };

munging them up a bit into 4 'slots'

    _local4[0] = ((_local3[0] & 252) >> 2);
    _local4[1] = (((_local3[0] & 3) << 4) | (_local3[1] >> 4));
    _local4[2] = (((_local3[1] & 15) << 2) | (_local3[2] >> 6));
    _local4[3] = (_local3[2] & 63);

padding the 4 byte result out with '64' in case the 3 bytes came up short

    while (_local6 < 3) {
        _local4[(_local6 + 1)] = 64;
        _local6++;
    };

and then using the big string at the top as a pick array to choose the character to represent the munged bits

    while (_local7 < _local4.length) {
        _local2 = (_local2 + BASE64_CHARS.charAt(_local4[_local7]));
        _local7++;
    };

in js here : http://jsfiddle.net/H4f2p/

I ran encodeByteArray('test') and got back dGVzdAAA

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for this satisfying answer. –  ebeeb Mar 8 '13 at 20:14

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