Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

When running the following code using visual c++2010 express and WinXP the 'for loop' executes consistently as follows:

Read 25000 lines in 31ms, Read 25000 lines in 62ms, Read 25000 lines in 46ms, Read 25000 lines in 62ms, Read 25000 lines in 46ms, Read 25000 lines in 46ms

However when I compile using visual c++2010 express on Windows 7 Home Edition the for loop executes as follows:

Read 25000 lines in 62ms, Read 25000 lines in 530ms, Read 25000 lines in 514ms, Read 25000 lines in 514ms, Read 25000 lines in 514ms, Read 25000 lines in 530ms

I'm trying to figure out why 'for loop' runs t msecs first time on Windows 7 but then jumps to 10 x t msecs for subsequent runs. Whereas on XP it runs consistently t msecs. It may be something particular to Windows 7 build / setup or something fundamental in code.

I have recently started programming C++ and would really appreciate assistance in working out what is going on in Windows 7 environment.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include "Elapsed.h"

using namespace std;

void readfile(){
    Elapsed time1;
    vector<string> lines;
    lines.reserve(50000);
    string s = "this is a string this is a longer string ";
    for(int i = 0; i<25000; i++) lines.push_back(s);
    cout<<"Read "<<lines.size()<<" lines in "<<time1().total_milliseconds()<<"ms\n";
}

int main(){
    readfile();
    readfile();
    readfile();
    readfile();
    readfile();
    readfile();
    system("PAUSE");
}

#include <boost/date_time.hpp> 
// Purpose: track elapsed time from constructor or reset
class Elapsed {
    boost::posix_time::ptime m_when;
public:
    static boost::posix_time::ptime now(){return boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::universal_time();}
    Elapsed(): m_when( now() )
    {
    } // end constructor

    void reset() { m_when = now(); }

    boost::posix_time::time_duration operator()() const {
        return now() - m_when;
    } //end operator()
};// end class
share|improve this question
1  
Are you doing a release build? if not then you're timing unoptimized code with loads of debug checks, and the measurements are meaningless. – Jonathan Wakely Mar 8 '13 at 19:57
    
there are a number of factors that could affect this: Are you running both tests on the same machine? If so, how? Are the C++ options identical? etc etc – Josh Greifer Mar 8 '13 at 20:08
    
That seems unreasonably slow. Are you using a "release build" or "debug build" - I compiled your code [with some hacks to remove the boost requirement], and my results are 25000 lines take 0ms, and 250000 lines take 10ms. But that is on a 64-bit Linux machine. But 500ms for one iteration is 5000 times slower, and even badly implemented Windows C++ code can't be THAT much slower. – Mats Petersson Mar 8 '13 at 20:12
    
many thanks guys ..doing release build – user2149346 Mar 8 '13 at 20:52
    
no tests that run slow are on Pentium T4300 2.1GHz 3GB RAM 64=bit OS Win 7 Home Premium SP1. Tests that run fast are on older T7100 1.8GHz 2GB Win XP 2003 SP3 – user2149346 Mar 8 '13 at 20:53

You should calculate your time like this:

boost::posix_time::time_duration span = time1();
cout << "Read " << lines.size() << " lines in "<< 
     span.total_milliseconds() << "ms\n";

Note that operator<< does not include a sequence point, so you may include in the timer the some of the output to cout, and the IO timing may be quite unpredictable.

share|improve this answer
    
hi there ..many thanks had not thought of that however checked out timer function as follows and it looks pretty accurate compared with time discrepancy between WinXP test and Win7: void readfile(){ Elapsed time1; vector<string>lines; lines.reserve(50000); string s= "this is a string"; time1.reset(); Sleep(1000); cout<<"Read "<<lines.size()<<" lines in "<<time1().total_milliseconds()<<"ms\n"; } and here is timing output:read 0 lines in 1000ms, read 0 lines in 1000ms, read 0 lines in 1014ms, read 0 lines in 1014ms, read 0 lines in 1014ms, read 0 lines in 1014ms – user2149346 Mar 8 '13 at 20:59
    
modified code as you rightly suggest rodrigo but prety much same result:void readfile(){ Elapsed time1; vector<string>lines; lines.reserve(50000); string s= "this is a string"; time1.reset(); for(int i=0; i<25000; ++i) lines.push_back(s); time1().total_milliseconds(); boost::posix_time::time_duration span = time1(); cout<<"Read "<<lines.size()<<" lines in "<<span.total_milliseconds()<<"ms\n"; } Read 25000 lines in 70ms Read 25000 lines in 520ms Read 25000 lines in 530ms Read 25000 lines in 592ms Read 25000 lines in 522ms Read 25000 lines in 530ms Press any key to continue . . . – user2149346 Mar 8 '13 at 21:16
    
ok i think i have worked what was up ..i was running with Debugger on. On Windows 7 machine when i do ctrl+F5 it runs perfect. Many thanks for all input. – user2149346 Mar 9 '13 at 12:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.