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Sorry if the title of the question is not exact enough. I recently moved all of my production stuff to a new production server (it used to be just a localhost deal).

The issue is quite a bit of my array work no longer works.

I used to be able to do something along these lines:

$arrtest = array();
$arrtest[1]="a";
$arrtest[1][2]="b";
var_dump($arrtest);

output:

array(2) {
  [1]=>
  string(1) "a"
  [2]=>
  array(1) {
    [2]=>
    string(1) "b"
  }
}

Which would be the same as:

$foo = array(1=>'a',array(2=>'b'));

However, the square brackets are no longer "assuming" an array. Here is the new production example:

$arrtest = array();
$arrtest[1]="a";
$arrtest[1][2]="b";
var_dump($arrtest);

output:

array(1) {
  [1]=>
  string(3) "a b"
}

I assume I am missing a silly setting in php.ini? I can't find what I'm looking for because I'm not sure how to word the question.

EDIT Real World Example since even my question itself is confusing.

foreach($mans as $key2=>$val2){
$models = scandir($level1.'/'.$val2);
    foreach($models as $key3=>$val3){
        if(substr($val3,0,1)==='.'){
            unset($models[$key3]);
        }
            $mans[$key2][]=$models[$val3];
    }
}

Pretty much about to re-write the entire thing at this point.

Trying to scan a top directoy and grab the folder names (held in $mans) then go through each directory of $mans recursivly and add it's directories under $mans[$key] as a second level.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You've got some funky logic going on. There's no way your first example can ever result in the first output.

You're setting $arrtest[1] to a string, but then you try to a set it as an array. Which is it?

$arrtest = array();
// You need to initialize the array here
$arrtest[1]=array();
$arrtest[1][]="a";
$arrtest[1][2]="b";
var_dump($arrtest);

This example matches your original output:

$arrtest = array();
// You need to initialize the array here
$arrtest[1]="a";
$arrtest[][2]="b";
var_dump($arrtest);

As does:

$arrtest = array();
// You need to initialize the array here
$arrtest[1]="a";
$arrtest[2][2]="b";
var_dump($arrtest);

Outputs:

array(2) {
  [1]=>
  string(1) "a"
  [2]=>
  array(1) {
    [2]=>
    string(1) "b"
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Never had to do that before, is this something new or could I be thinking of something else? It used to assume [] would already initialize the array. Just using $arr[]; would initialize $arr as an array. –  Hydra IO Mar 8 '13 at 20:00
    
It could be a difference in PHP versions, but I've tried your code in two different prod environments and it matches what your prod environment is doing. Think about it, is $arrtest[1] a string or an array? You're trying to use it as both. This is close to what you're doing: codepad.org/vsXT9OiL The first element of the array is a string, the 2nd is an array. –  mkaatman Mar 8 '13 at 20:01
    
for example if I wanted to go through a loop, and do $arr[]=$someval then $arr would hold each instance of the loop as an array value. In the current prod server this is not the case, it fatal errors out on [] –  Hydra IO Mar 8 '13 at 20:03
    
You're not doing that though, you're setting $arr[1] twice. Once as a string, then as an array. Check out my 2nd example. I think that's what you're trying to do as it matches your output. –  mkaatman Mar 8 '13 at 20:04
2  
$arr[] = 'something' does initialize an array, if $arr is not already a string!! –  Francis Avila Mar 8 '13 at 20:26

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