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This question already has an answer here:

I now want to make template that will push some elements to vectors and other types, that support push_back operators.

I can do it like this

template<typename T>
T fill(size_t n) {
    T v;
    //(1)
    for(size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i){
        v.push_back(generate_some_how());
    }
    return v;
}

It works. But now I want to improve speed for types that support it using v.reserve(n); instead of (1). But I want to still be able to compile this code for types that will not compile reserve

Is it some easy way to achieve this?

I know that I may specialize hard-coded types but it doesn't seem to be good.

C++11 is OK.

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marked as duplicate by Nicol Bolas, Peter O., Bart, Mario Sannum, Daij-Djan Mar 10 '13 at 18:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I doubt it, but I don't know for sure. My guess is you will have to use template specialization – NG. Mar 8 '13 at 20:05
4  
Not too hard.... you need to write a trait that detects the presence of the reserve member function with the correct signature. With that tool in your belt there are different approaches, you can write a reserve_ template function that uses that trait to dispatch to either a call to reserve() or a no-op and call it from // (1) or you could use SFINAE either in the helper or the fill itself. I would try to use a helper function as most of the code in fill is the same. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 8 '13 at 20:07
    
If you're using C++11 consider supporting the appropriate emplace call to replace push_back. – Captain Obvlious Mar 8 '13 at 20:20
2  
Is there any reason you're doing this instead of just calling v.reserve(n); std::generate_n(std::back_inserter(v), n, generate_some_how); at the call site? (other than dropping 1 line of code) Or it could also be slightly more optimal: v.resize(n); std::generate_n(v.begin(), n, generate_some_how); – David Mar 8 '13 at 20:34
2  
If you're expecting std containers, or containers that meet std container requirements you should take a typename T::size_type not a size_t – David Mar 8 '13 at 20:44
up vote 7 down vote accepted

An easy example using C++11:

template<class T>
auto maybe_reserve(T& v, size_t n, int)
    -> decltype(v.reserve(n), void())
{
  v.reserve(n);
}

template<class T>
void maybe_reserve(T&, size_t, long){}

template<typename T>
T fill(std::size_t n) {
    T v;
    maybe_reserve(v, n, 0);
    for(size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i){
        v.push_back(generate_some_how());
    }
    return v;
}

Live example. For explanations, take a look here.

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A C++03 version is also possible, albeit more convolute and restrictive. – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 20:20
    
didn't compile after change resize to reserve for deque ideone – RiaD Mar 8 '13 at 20:29
    
@RiaD: That's a problem with GCC 4.7. Clang 3.2 and GCC 4.8 work correctly. GCC's bug can be worked around by changing the return type of the first overload to decltype(v.reserve(n), void()). – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 20:34
    
thanks, it works. – RiaD Mar 8 '13 at 20:40
1  
Btw, maybe you could avoid the extra dummy argument? See this example :) – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 20:49

A possible approach in C++11:

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct reserve_helper
{ static void call(T& obj, std::size_t s) { } };

template<typename T>
struct reserve_helper<T, decltype(std::declval<T>().reserve(0), void(0))>
{ static void call(T& obj, std::size_t s) { obj.reserve(s); } };

template<typename T>
T fill(std::size_t n)
{
    T v;
    reserve_helper<T>::call(v, 10);
    for(std::size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i){
        v.push_back(generate_somehow());
    }

    return v;
}

Here is a live example showing that the call to reserve() is simply skipped with a UDT that doesn't define any reserve() member function.

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Requires that reserve returns void (yes, usually the case, I know). :) – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 20:21
    
@Xeo: All right, all right :) Let me edit – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 20:22
1  
Did you try compiling and running this? :3 – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 20:27
    
@Xeo: I did :) – Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 20:28
    
Too bad it doesn't work. :3 (Hint: You're "reserving" 10, but capacity after the call is 4.) – Xeo Mar 8 '13 at 20:29

Not too hard.... you need to write a trait that detects the presence of the reserve member function with the correct signature. With that tool in your belt there are different approaches, you can write a reserve_ template function that uses that trait to dispatch to either a call to reserve() or a no-op and call it from // (1) or you could use SFINAE either in the helper or the fill itself. I would try to use a helper function as most of the code in fill is the same.

Detect if void reserve(std::size_t) member function exists in C++03:

template <typename T>
struct has_reserve {
   typedef char yes;
   typedef yes  no[2];
   template <typename U, U> struct ptrmbr_to_type;
   template <typename U> 
   static yes& test(ptrmbr_to_type<void (T::*)(std::size_t),&U::reserve>*);
   template <typename U> static no& test(...);
   static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(0))==sizeof(yes);
};
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