Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a templated framework for serializing data and have run into a bit of a snag involving const-ness guarantees in my code. I've found a few ways to get around the const problem (using const_cast and other dirtier techniques), but thought I'd ask the problem here.

The following is as trivial of an example as I can boil things down to...

#include <deque>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>

using namespace std; // bad form, but for simplicity

// Forward decl's
template <typename C, typename SubC> class Wrapper;

template <typename C, typename SubC>
struct w_iterator
{
    typedef w_iterator           _Self;
    typedef SubC &               _Ref;
    typedef SubC *               _Ptr;
    typedef typename C::iterator internal_iter;

    // Default c-tors
    w_iterator() = delete;
    w_iterator(const internal_iter & i) : internal(i) { }

    // Copy c-tor
    w_iterator(const w_iterator & i) : internal(i.internal) { }

    // Dereference operators - the implementation of these is
    // hackish and and awful, its done this way purely to create
    // a simplified example
    _Ref operator * () const
        { proxy.reset(new SubC(*internal)); return *proxy; }
    _Ptr operator -> () const
        { proxy.reset(new SubC(*internal)); return proxy.get(); }

    // Comparison
    bool operator == (const _Self & i)
        { return (internal == i.internal); }
    bool operator != (const _Self & i)
        { return (internal != i.internal); }

    // Manipulation
    _Self & operator ++ () { ++internal; return *this; }

    // This is a hack to simplify the example, my real code uses a different mechanism
    // for the temporary storage of the return type for the dereference objects
    mutable std::unique_ptr<SubC> proxy;
    internal_iter internal;
};

template <typename C, typename SubC>
struct const_w_iterator
{
    typedef w_iterator<C,SubC>         _nonConstSelf;
    typedef const_w_iterator           _Self;
    typedef const SubC &               _Ref;
    typedef const SubC *               _Ptr;
    typedef typename C::iterator       nonconst_internal_iter;
    typedef typename C::const_iterator internal_iter;

    const_w_iterator(const nonconst_internal_iter & i) : internal(i) { }
    const_w_iterator(const internal_iter & i) : internal(i) { }

    // Dereference
    _Ref operator * () const
        { proxy.reset(new SubC(*internal)); return *proxy; }
    _Ptr operator -> () const
        { proxy.reset(new SubC(*internal)); return proxy.get(); }

    // Comparison
    bool operator == (const _Self & i)
        { return (internal == i.internal); }
    bool operator == (const _nonConstSelf & i)
        { return (internal == i.internal); }
    bool operator != (const _Self & i)
        { return (internal != i.internal); }
    bool operator != (const _nonConstSelf & i)
        { return (internal != i.internal); }
    // Manipulation
    _Self & operator ++ () { ++internal; return *this; }

    // This is a hack to simplify the example, my real code uses a different mechanism
    // for the temporary storage of the return type for the dereference objects    
    mutable std::unique_ptr<const SubC> proxy;
    internal_iter internal;
};

template <typename C, typename SubC>
class Wrapper
{
 public:
    // Typedefs - shared btw here & const_Wrapper
    typedef w_iterator<C, SubC>       iterator;
    typedef const_w_iterator<C, SubC> const_iterator;

    // Default construction - only allow construction with an underlying
    // container
    Wrapper(C & c) : container(&c) { }

    // Copy constructor
    Wrapper(const Wrapper & c) = delete; // violates const-ness
    Wrapper(Wrapper & c) : container(c.container) { }

    // Iterator access
    iterator begin() { return iterator(container->begin()); }
    iterator end() { return iterator(container->end()); }

    const_iterator cbegin() const
        { return const_iterator(container->cbegin()); }
    const_iterator cend() const
        { return const_iterator(container->cend()); }

    // Accessor functions
    size_t length() const { return container->size(); }

 protected:
    C * container;
};

 #define BROKEN 1
int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    deque<string> d = { "one", "two", "three" };
    deque<decltype(d)> dd = { d };
    deque<decltype(dd)> ddd { dd };

    cout << d.size() << " " << dd.size() << " " << ddd.size() << endl;

    Wrapper<decltype(d), string> w(d);
    Wrapper<decltype(dd), decltype(w)> ww(dd);
    Wrapper<decltype(ddd), decltype(ww)> www(ddd);

    for (auto i = www.begin(); i != www.end(); ++i)
    {
        cout << "www: " << i->length() << endl;
#if BROKEN
        // produces the error: no matching function for call to
        //   'Wrapper<deque<string>, string>::Wrapper(const deque<string>&)'
        for (auto j = i->cbegin(); j != i->cend(); ++j)
#else
        for (auto j = i->begin(); j != i->end(); ++j)
#endif
        {
            cout << "ww: " << j->length() << endl;
            for (auto k = j->cbegin(); k != j->cend(); ++k)
                cout << *k << endl;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Now, its rather obvious why things fail to compile when BROKEN == 1, but I'm having a difficult time figuring out the correct way of structuring things to get around the fact that I want a non-const pointer inside of a Wrapper, but would still like to preserve the const semantics for the return types of cbegin() and cend(). I've tried a few things, including creating a separate const_Wrapper class with different semantics, but keep running into template resolution issues with these wrapper classes.

If anyone could suggest either (1) a better way of doing this sort of thing, or (2) point me in the direction of some code that does something similar, I would really appreciate it. Do keep in mind that there is a reason that isn't apparent from this example for creating the wrappers around the underlying containers (in that the real wrapper class inherits an interface for reading and writing).

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
5  
150 lines of code is as trivial as it can get? Ok, I will take a deep breath and start reading :-) –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 21:41
2  
@AndyProwl You've got balls man. You've got balls... –  Mysticial Mar 8 '13 at 21:44
1  
Hey, some of them are comments and whitespace! –  moonchild Mar 8 '13 at 21:47
1  
@moonchild: Hope I won't need to read the comments ;) –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 21:48
2  
@moonchild: Forgive me, I had to give up. Maybe you should have explained a bit more what you are trying to do (what Wrapper is meant for) rather than focusing on the very final obstacle –  Andy Prowl Mar 8 '13 at 21:53
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

The problem can be simplified a bit to just

const_w_iterator<decltype(dd), decltype(w)> itr = ww.cbegin();
*itr;

The problem is the call to proxy.reset(new SubC(*internal));, which in this case is equivilent to:

proxy.reset(new Wrapper<decltype(d), string>(*internal))
                                          //     ^
                                          //const decltype(d)

but a Wrapper<const T, ...> can't take a T in the constructor. I think this is where a solution might be found; if your subclass takes a decltype(d), you need to be passing it a decltype(d); Not sure what the solution would be exactly, but maybe the above will help someone spot it!

share|improve this answer
    
darn, you beat me to it. Have an upvote. –  EHuhtala Mar 8 '13 at 22:46
    
I have a solution to my issue at this point, that makes use of 2 additional template parameters to the Wrapper class... the first of which is a const version of the SubC type. The second is a boolean, indicating the const-ness of the Wrapper class. Rather than post it here, I'll provide a like to it: pastebin.com/ZcHNQATU –  moonchild Mar 8 '13 at 23:18
add comment

Would you consider keeping two pointers inside of Wrapper like this:

template <typename C, typename SubC>
class Wrapper
{
 public:
    // Typedefs - shared btw here & const_Wrapper
    typedef w_iterator<C, SubC>       iterator;
    typedef const_w_iterator<C, SubC> const_iterator;

    // Default construction - only allow construction with an underlying
    // container
    Wrapper(C & c) : container(&c), const_container(&c) { }
    Wrapper(const C & c) : container(NULL), const_container(&c) { }

    // Copy constructor
    Wrapper(const Wrapper & c) = delete; // violates const-ness

    Wrapper(Wrapper & c) : container(c.container), const_container(c.const_container) { }

    // Iterator access
    iterator begin() { return iterator(container->begin()); }
    iterator end() { return iterator(container->end()); }

    const_iterator cbegin() const
        { return const_iterator(const_container->cbegin()); }
    const_iterator cend() const
        { return const_iterator(const_container->cend()); }

    // Accessor functions
    size_t length() const { return const_container->size(); }

 protected:
    C * container;
    const C * const_container;
};

There is a NULL pointer error if you attempt to call begin() or end() on a wrapper that was constructed with a const reference, which of course is bad. But it's bad to be calling them anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see the pastebin post i created at pastebin.com/ZcHNQATU ... It is roughly the same concept as your idea, but everything is handled at compile-time, rather than runtime (yay for static_assert!) –  moonchild Mar 8 '13 at 23:23
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.