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I've been spending some time with this issue and decided to come here to see if anyone would be able to help me. I have a given text file I made and I am sending the contents of the text file to my program when it is being run. For example: if I say

    scanf("%d", &integerOne); 

then my text file should place the first line (for example) the number 8 into that slot I want this to keep doing this until it reaches the end of the file, but that is where I am running into trouble.

Unlike my example above I am using chars:

    while((scanf("%s", userstring)) != EOF)
    {
            if(userstring[0] == 'c')
            {
                  scanf("%d", &cinput); 
            }
           if(userstring[0] == 'a')                       
           {        
                    scanf("%d", &cone);
                    scanf("%d", &cone);
           }
    }

Just for some background, I made the array 'userstring' to hold either 'c' (for connect) or 'a' (for add). I was trying to get the program to execute to loops and other functions when it did not receive any more 'char' input. All of your insight is extremely helpful. Much thanks, Alex.

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What does your input look like? –  Scott Hunter Mar 8 '13 at 21:47
    
scanf("%d", &cone); scanf("%d", &cone); The second call to scanf here will overwrite the value of cone, and the first value will be lost. Is that really what you want? –  OregonTrail Mar 8 '13 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

scanf returns the number of input items that have been successfully matched and assigned, thus it would be better to check whether its return value is equal to 1. Also note that scanf calls inside this loop might fail, so in case the input might be invalid, you should check their return values as well:

while (scanf("%s", userstring) == 1)
{
    if (userstring[0] == 'c')
    {
        if (scanf("%d", &cinput) != 1)
            return -1;                  // TODO: scanf failed
    }
    ...
}

and to answer your actual problem: while always prompt the user to enter another string, becuase the only way how to stop this reading is to enter end-of-input control code, which is Ctrl+Z (on Windows) or Ctrl+D (on Mac, Linux, Unix).

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Thank you! That was my problem! –  AbsoluteZ3r0 Mar 9 '13 at 1:31

If one of your scanf's inside the loop encounters an error, that might cause the scanf in the while guard to misbehave (from your perspective).

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