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I am trying to set the boolean variable 'answer' to true or false based on the results of testing the String variable 'response' for a specific value of "Y" or "y".

What evaluates correctly: Example 1: using a switch statement to test for the String 'response' value, Example 2: using (response.equals("Y")) and (response.equals("y")) in an if-else statement,

What doesn't evaluate correctly: Example 3: using (response == "Y") or (response == "y") in an if-else statement,

All three examples compile without errors.

My question is: why does example one and two work, but example three does not?

I have tried to use single quotes (i.e. 'Y' and 'y') in the Example 3 if-else condition evaluation, but that results in a compile error 'incomparable types: String and char', and I tried using '=' instead of '==' but that results in a compile error 'incompatible types: required: boolean, found:String'

I googled 'java testing for string values' and found:

To compare strings for their content equality we must use the String.equals() method. This method ensures that it will compare the content of both string instead of the object reference of the both string. This method returns true if both strings in comparison have the same content.

Do not use the == operator to compare string for its content. The == operator checks for object reference equality, it returns true only if both objects point to the same reference. This operator returns false if the object doesn't point to the same references.

but I don't understand what it means or if this is in fact the answer to my question. Any suggestions for tracking down an answer would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Example One:

public static boolean AskQuestion() {
    boolean answer = false;
    String response = "";

    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter Y to repeat, any other key to exit: ");
    response = input.next();

    switch (response) {
        case "Y": answer = true;
                  break;
        case "y": answer = true;
                  break;
        default: answer = false;
    }
    return answer;
}

Example Two:

public static boolean AskQuestion(){
    boolean answer = false;
    String response = "";

    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("");
    System.out.println("Enter Y to play again, any other key to exit: ");
    response = input.next();

    if (response.equals("y")) {
        answer = true;
    }
    else if (response.equals("Y")) {
        answer = true;
    }
    else {
        answer = false;
    }
    return answer;
}

Example Three:

public static boolean AskQuestion() {

    boolean answer = false;
    String response = "";

    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.println("Enter Y to repeat, any other key to exit: ");
    response = input.next();

    if (response == "y") {
        answer = true;
    }
    else if (response == "Y") {
        answer = true;
    }
    else {
        answer = false;
    }
    return answer;
}
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marked as duplicate by user000001, Brent Worden, jlordo, nsgulliver, Steven Penny Mar 9 '13 at 0:37

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Using == checks if the variables point to the same object. Which they most likely don't. –  jonhopkins Mar 8 '13 at 22:21
    
Yes, it is the answer to your question. single quotes are used for literal chars, not strings. And = is an assignment operator, not a comparison operator. You'd better learn the syntax of Java instead of trying random things. –  JB Nizet Mar 8 '13 at 22:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First in your second example you could use the equalsIgnoreCase method to reduce some code.

if (response.equalsIgnoreCase("y")) {
    answer = true;
}

In Java when comparing using the == operator you are checking if two objects are the same object ie "Are there references the same". Using equals or equalsIgnoreCase compares the values of two objects.

Since you have created a variable/allocated memory (create a reference) for response and assigned the input to that variable, it has a different reference than the one created for "Y" or "y". So when the == operator returns false it is correctly determining these two objects are not the same object/reference.

For example:

    String something = new String("something");
    String somethingElse = new String("something");

    System.out.println(something == somethingElse); //prints false

Another Example:

        String somethingElse = "";
        String something = new String("something");
        somethingElse = "something";

        System.out.println(somethingElse == something); //returns false
        System.out.println(somethingElse.equals(something)); //returns true
share|improve this answer
    
OK I get it: somethingElse == somethingElse since it is the same String (object). And thanks for the .equalsIgnoreCase tip. –  E.K. Fulton Mar 8 '13 at 22:44
    
@E.K.Fulton exactly comparing something else in the manner you suggest would equate to true, but for most String comparisons your primarily concerned about comparing the value of the String. I cannot think of a time when I found the need to compare Strings using == –  Kevin Bowersox Mar 8 '13 at 22:46

You could do the whole thing much more tidily with something like:

static Set<String> trues = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"y","yes","1"}));
static Set<String> falses = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"n","no","0"}));

public static boolean isTrue ( String s ) {
    return trues.contains(s.toLowerCase());
}

public static boolean isFalse ( String s ) {
    return falses.contains(s.toLowerCase());
}

public static boolean isTrueOrFalse ( String s, boolean dflt ) {
    return isTrue(s) ? true :
            isFalse(s) ? false :
            dflt;
}

public static boolean isTrueOrFalse ( String s ) {
    return isTrueOrFalse(s, false);
}
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== returns true if the references(objects) are exactly the same. In your case response == "y" aren't the same.

equals(Object) returns true when the method is written to return true. This can be the same object, an equivalent object or what ever the developer felt like writing.

You should always use equals, because they are not the same objects.

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