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I am at my wits end here. I am writing a program in C++ that will read a text file that contains the following as a brief example:

+ 23 34
- 9 8
+ 100 1
* 8 7
^ 2 5
/ 45 8

The reader will store the first operands in a char type and based on the char it retrieves, a function will be called to preform the operation on the two numbers, here's a sample functions that will do this.

void doDivision(ifstream &inFile) {
    char ch;
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> ch >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Division     " << num1 << "    " << num2 << "    " << "Quotient " << "    " << num1/num2 << " Remain " << num1%num2  << endl; 
}

One thing is I am not sure why the argument is &inFile this function prototype is not made by me, but it is from a book maybe this is why I cannot I get it to work.

Here is my main function:

int main()
{

ifstream inFile;
char ch;
int num1, num2;

inFile.open("math.txt");
if (inFile.fail())
{
cout << ch;
      cout << "The math.txt input file failed to open";
        return -1;
}


 while(inFile)
{
    switch (ch) {

    case '+':
        doAddition(inFile);
        break;
    case '-':
        doSubtraction(inFile);
        break;
    case '*':
        doMultiplication(inFile);
        cout << "debug " << ch;
        break;
    case '/':
        doDivision(inFile);
        break;
    case '!':
        doFactorial(inFile);
        break;
    default:
        cout << "Invalid Operation" << endl;

    }

    inFile >> ch;
}

inFile.close();
return 0;
}

All of this together produces the following unintended result

Invalid Operation 
Addition 3 34 sum 37 (wrong data in text file is 23 and 34)
subtraction 0 8 difference 8 (data in textfile is 9 and 8 respectively)

How would I implement this, I am overwhelmed since I have never worked with files before.

share|improve this question
    
assuming you've worked with std::cin, here is a good reference of std::fstream, which has the same input mechanism as std::cin. –  EHuhtala Mar 8 '13 at 22:56
    
As with any parsing I have to strongly recommend that you learn to use a proper parser. Try boost::spirit for example. To know how to properly parse text is something that is useful in many occasions. –  AxelOmega Mar 8 '13 at 23:00
1  
@AxelOmega i would not use Boost while learning. –  Aniket Mar 8 '13 at 23:02
    
@Aniket: It might be true, but the sooner he gets there the better. My point was that there is a proper way to do this and leraning how to parse files it is something that is good to learn sooner then later. Flex/Bison is of course also an option. –  AxelOmega Mar 8 '13 at 23:09
    
You should pass file pointer as reference instead of by value to a fn ...here change fn definitions to doAddition(ifstream *fp) and call fn doAddition(&fp)... –  Richeek Mar 8 '13 at 23:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One simple error is that inside of your while() loop, you don't call inFile >> ch until after the first time through the loop. Try fixing that and see if it helps.

Also, what Aniket said in their answer is another problem you need to look out for.

So in short, your loop should look roughly like this:

inFile >> ch;
while(inFile) {
    switch(ch) {
    case '+':
        ...
    }
    inFile >> ch;
}

And your functions should be similar to this:

void doDivision(ifstream &inFile) {
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;

    ...
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: Your first example has a fault. If the input operation fails, it won't be processed until the execution gets to the top of the loop again. In your example, try moving the inFile >> ch; to before the while loop. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:11
    
Thank you for pointing that out! I've edited my post to take care of that. Please either let me know again or directly edit it if there's something else I've missed. –  medgno Mar 9 '13 at 1:47

You do not read into ch for the first iteration. In fact, when you check that your file opened with no problem, you do cout << ch; despite the fact that ch is uninitialized. You could simply move the inFile >> ch; to the top of the while loop.

The next problem is that inside each of your doSomething functions, you are doing inFile >> ch again, which will attempt to read the operation character again. Your doSomething functions don't need to know ch though, since the function itself was chosen based on the value of ch.

Here is how I would write this:

ifstream inFile("math.txt"); // You can specify the file name here
char op;
int left_operand, right_operand;

// Use extraction has while condition
while (inFile >> op >> left_operand >> right_operand) {
  switch (op) {
    // Pass operands to the relevant function
    case '+': doAddition(left_operand, right_operand); break;
    // ...
  }
}

// You do not need to close inFile, it will be closed when it goes out of scope
return 0;
share|improve this answer
1  
He is also reading inFile >> ch in doDivision() function :-).. –  Aniket Mar 8 '13 at 22:58
    
+1: you beat me to posting (what I'd agree is) the right way to do it by 16 seconds. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 8 '13 at 23:07
    
@JerryCoffin Yeah, I just saw how similar our solutions were. Eerie! –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 8 '13 at 23:09
    
One issue with multiple >> in the while expression is that the fault cannot be isolated to which input. Also, if the first extraction fails, will the remaining ones be executed? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:16
    
@ThomasMatthews That's true, but if the first one fails, the following will not be executed. :) –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 9 '13 at 10:46

Since you are already doing inFile >> ch in main() it will be wrong(logically) to read it again in doAddition() and other methods.

since you've posted doDivision() method where you read in the ch character, I am assuming you're doing the same in doAddition() as well.

Also your output:

Addition 3 34 sum 37 (wrong data in text file is 23 and 34)

Tells us all - you've read 1 character(found +) then read another character in doAddition() method, - which read 2 into ch of doAddition() then read 3 and 34..

This is where the error actually is.

Solution: change your doAddition() and all other functions to something like below.

void doAddition(ifstream &inFile) {
    char ch;
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Addition of " << num1 << " and " << num2 << " = "<< (num1+num2) << '\n';
}

Also, in the main() function:

the while loop should look like this:

while(inFile)
{
    inFile >> ch;
    switch (ch) {

    case '+':
        doAddition(inFile);
        break;
    case '-':
        doSubtraction(inFile);
        break;
    case '*':
        doMultiplication(inFile);
        cout << "debug " << ch;
        break;
    case '/':
        doDivision(inFile);
        break;
    case '!':
        doFactorial(inFile);
        break;
    default:
        cout << "Invalid Operation" << endl;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about the default case? When an unknown operator is encountered, you'll have three errors show up - not one, since File >> ch will try to read the next arguments which are not operators. –  jrd1 Mar 8 '13 at 23:42
    
@jrd1 that's upto OP to decide. He might want to break out of the loop or just report and continue. This is functional issue IMHO. –  Aniket Mar 8 '13 at 23:44
    
Agreed. I thought it was worth pointing out. –  jrd1 Mar 8 '13 at 23:47
    
Same fault: the input is not checked after it occurs. The inFile >> ch; will fail at EOF, reading an undefined character and that character is processed through the switch statement. Leave an input statement at the bottom (there was nothing wrong with it) and also put one before the while loop. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:14

Ideally, there are better ways of doing what you suggest, but if you have to make your code look and perform like this, then the appropriate solution should be something of this sort:

#include <vector>
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

void doAddition(ifstream &inFile) {
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Addition of " << num1 << " and " << num2 << " = "<< (num1+num2) << '\n';   
}

void doSubtraction(ifstream &inFile) {
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Subtraction of " << num1 << " and " << num2 << " = "<< (num1-num2) << '\n';
}

void doMultiplication(ifstream &inFile) {
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Multiplication of " << num1 << " and " << num2 << " = "<< (num1*num2) << '\n';
}

void doDivision(ifstream &inFile) {
    float num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2;
    cout << "Division of " << num1 << " and " << num2 << " = "<< (num1/num2) << '\n';
}

void doFactorial(ifstream &inFile) {
    int t1, t2;

    inFile >> t1 >> t2;

    //perform factorial here
}

void readToNextLine(ifstream& inFile) {
    string t1, t2;

    inFile >> t1 >> t2;
}

int main()
{
    ifstream inFile;
    char ch;
    int num1, num2;

    inFile.open("math.txt");

    if (inFile.is_open()){

        inFile >> ch;
        while (!inFile.eof())
        {
            switch (ch) 
            {

                case '+':
                    doAddition(inFile);
                    break;
                case '-':
                    doSubtraction(inFile);
                    break;
                case '*':
                    doMultiplication(inFile);
                    break;
                case '/':
                    doDivision(inFile);
                    break;
                case '!':
                    doFactorial(inFile);
                    break;
                default:
                    readToNextLine(inFile);
                    cout << "Invalid Operation" << endl;
            }
            inFile >> ch;
        }
            inFile.close();
    }
    else
    {
        cout << "The math.txt input file failed to open";
        return -1;
    }

    inFile.close();
    return 0;
}

A couple things to note here:

Some of the solutions that the others suggested, do not consider the default case - which simply forgoes reading the rest of the line, resulting in logic errors - which no one wants.

Now, as for a "better", more general solution, it would be more ideal to store everything as strings first, then tokenize, and attempt to convert the appropriate token to the desired type output.

But, as I noted before, if you wish to conform to the code you had previously, then this is appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 you did the inFile >> ch; placement correctly. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:18

First of all, you are reading chr, before assigning a value to it.

Change your while loop like this:

while(inFile)
{
    inFile >> ch; // assign before reading
    switch (ch) {

    case '+':
        doAddition(inFile);
        break;
    case '-':
        doSubtraction(inFile);
        break;
    case '*':
        doMultiplication(inFile);
        cout << "debug " << ch;
        break;
    case '/':
        doDivision(inFile);
        break;
    case '!':
        doFactorial(inFile);
        break;
    default:
        cout << "Invalid Operation" << endl;
    }
}

And change your doDivision function like this:

void doDivision(ifstream &inFile)
{ 
    int num1, num2;

    inFile >> num1 >> num2; // your already read the arithmetic operator
    cout << "Division     " << num1 << "    " << num2 << "    " << "Quotient " << " 
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about the default case? If the default case is encountered, you'll result in three errors being output per line with an unknown operator. –  jrd1 Mar 8 '13 at 23:39
    
What happens when inFile >> ch in the main loop encounters EOF? I believe that it has an unknown character (or the last one read) and that is processed through the switch statement. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:17

First, initial pass, your ch variable is not initialized. It is initialized at the bottom of the loop.

Try adding:

 inFile >> ch;

before the while loop.

share|improve this answer

Unless you're feeling masochistic, it's almost certainly easiest to read the operator and two operands all at once, then carry out the operation:

char operation;
int operand1, operand2;

while (infile >> op >> operand1 >> operand2) 
   switch(operation) {
       case '+': add(operand1, operand2); break;
       case '-': sub(operand1, operand2); break;
       case '*': mul(operand1, operand2); break;
       case '/': div(operand1, operand2); break;
   }

For only four operators, this works well enough as-is. If you're going to have many more, you'd probably be better off using a table of pointers to functions instead:

typedef int (*op)(int, int);

op operators[UCHAR_MAX];

for (int i=0; i<UCHAR_MAX; i++)
    operators[i] = report_bad_operator;

operators['+'] = add;
operators['-'] = sub;
operators['/'] = div;
operators['*'] = mul;
// more operators here

while (infile >> operation >> operand1 >> operand2)
    operators[operation](operand1, operand2);

The obvious reason/time to do otherwise would be to deal with non-binary operators (i.e., ones that don't necessarily take exactly two operands).

share|improve this answer
    
I'm really curious, if the first operator extraction fails, will the other extractions be executed? –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:19
    
I suggest renaming "operator" variable to something else. It tends to conflict with the function, such as operator<(). –  Thomas Matthews Mar 9 '13 at 1:20
    
@ThomasMatthews: Once an extraction fails, the failbit for the stream is set, so all further extractions will also fail until the stream is reset. Good point about the name -- thanks. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 9 '13 at 4:09

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