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Working in R, I have data of a similar structure to below (code block 1). And I'm looking to create a new data.frame with the following characteristics:

For each unique ID_1 value, I'd like to have two new columns, one containing a list of (ID_2s that share ID_1 & Direction==1) and the other column containing a list of (ID_2s that share ID_1 & Direction==0), (see next code block 2)

Dataset Block 1 (initial):

ID_1    ID_2    Direction
100001  1           1
100001  11          1
100001  111         1
100001  1111        0
100001  11111       0
100001  111111      0
100002  2           1
100002  22          1
100002  222         0
100002  2222        0
100003  3           1
100003  33          1
100003  333         1
100003  3333        0
100003  33333       0
100003  333333      1
100004  4           1
100004  44          1

Converted into:

Dataset Block 2 (desired output):

ID_1    ID_2_D1             ID_2_D0
100001  1,11,111            1111,11111,111111
100002  2,22                222,222
100003  3,33,333,333333     3333,33333
100004  4,44    

I have code that does this, (taking loops of subset of subsets), but I am running this over many millions of unique "ID_1"s, making this very time consuming (hours, I tell ya!!).

Any advice - perhaps using apply() or the plyr() package that might get this to run faster?


Code for reference:

DF <- data.frame(ID_1=c(100001,100001,100001,100001,100001,100001,100002,100002,100002,100002,100003,100003,100003,100003,100003,100003,100004,100004)
                   ,ID_2=c(1,11,111,1111,11111,111111,2,22,222,2222,3,33,333,3333,33333,333333,4,44)
                   ,Direction=c(1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,1,1)
                   )

My current (too slow) code:

  DF2 <- data.frame( ID_1=DF[!duplicated(DF$ID_1),][,1])

  for (i in 1:length(unique(DF2$ID_1))){
    DF2$ID_2_D1[i] <- list(subset(DF,ID_1==unique(DF2$ID_1)[i] & Direction==1)$ID_2)
    DF2$ID_2_D0[i] <- list(subset(DF,ID_1==unique(DF2$ID_1)[i] & Direction==0)$ID_2)        
  }
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Like this:

library(reshape2)
dcast(DF, ID_1 ~ Direction, value.var = "ID_2", list)
#     ID_1                   0                  1
# 1 100001 1111, 11111, 111111         1, 11, 111
# 2 100002           222, 2222              2, 22
# 3 100003         3333, 33333 3, 33, 333, 333333
# 4 100004                                  4, 44    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yeah that's a lot nicer than my clunky solution. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 9 '13 at 1:25
    
My god man. Testing over tiny subset of my full data, my code (in the original post, above) was clocked to get through the full dataset in over 20 hours (hence, my post). Your code did it in 5 seconds. --I think I can tell the difference between a good programmer, and myself. Thank you for saving me many hours! –  EconomiCurtis Mar 9 '13 at 4:59
    
@EconomiCurtis Out of interest what method was the fastest? I am assuming this one, but it looks like dcast is using lapply and cousins anyway, so I was wondering if it was much faster? If this solution worked for you, be sure to tick the green arrow next to the top of the solution so this question can be marked as answered. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 9 '13 at 9:40
    
Kind of a dumb question for y'all -- but curious if you could tell me (or, drop me a link to the wikipedia article or cran documentation) on why dcast is so much faster than my loop? --I did this over several million rows, and dcast did it (plus a bit extra subsetting & merging) in 17 seconds, where -like I said- my method was clocked to complete it in a day. (just looking to learn the underlying theory) –  EconomiCurtis Mar 9 '13 at 21:14
    
And to @SimonO101 -- Over my data (and ignoring all the extra subsetting & merging bits needed additionally:) (1) flodel's dcast: 7.4 seconds, (2) Ananda Mahto's aggregate took 23 seconds over the same task, (3) Arun's addition: I honestly couldn't get to run, sorry, and (4) my loop was clocked to do it in 190 hours (I clocked it over a 0.01% subset and it took 68 seconds). –  EconomiCurtis Mar 9 '13 at 21:40

@flodel's answer is by far the most straightforward one that I can think of, but here is an option in base R using aggregate and merge. It makes use of the "subset" argument in the aggregate step to get the separate columns for when "Direction == 0" and "Direction == 1".

temp1 <- aggregate(ID_2 ~ ., DF, as.vector, subset = c(Direction == 0))
temp2 <- aggregate(ID_2 ~ ., DF, as.vector, subset = c(Direction == 1))
merge(temp1[-2], temp2[-2], by = "ID_1", all = TRUE, suffixes=c("_0", "_1"))
#     ID_1              ID_2_0             ID_2_1
# 1 100001 1111, 11111, 111111         1, 11, 111
# 2 100002           222, 2222              2, 22
# 3 100003         3333, 33333 3, 33, 333, 333333
# 4 100004                NULL              4, 44

A related approach (not sure if it would be any faster) would be to use split to create the subsets, lapply to aggregate over the resulting list, and Reduce to facilitate the merge:

Reduce(function(x, y) 
  merge(x, y, by = "ID_1", all = TRUE, suffixes = c("_0", "_1")), 
       lapply(split(DF[1:2], DF$Direction), 
              function(x) aggregate(ID_2 ~ ID_1, x, as.vector)))

And, of course, here is one approach using data.table, which you might want to consider as you've mentioned having to work *over many millions of unique "ID_1"s*. You're unlikely to see any speed benefit from this small example, but you should with your actual data.

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(DF, key = "ID_1")
DT0 <- DT[Direction == 0, list(D0 = list(ID_2)), by = key(DT)]
DT1 <- DT[Direction == 1, list(D1 = list(ID_2)), by = key(DT)]
DT0[DT1]
#      ID_1                D0              D1
# 1: 100001 1111,11111,111111        1,11,111
# 2: 100002          222,2222            2,22
# 3: 100003        3333,33333 3,33,333,333333
# 4: 100004                              4,44

Update

As mentioned by @Arun in the R Public chat room, this is a simplified data.table approach that avoids having to create two separate objects and merge them.

DT[, list(list(D0 = ID_2[Direction==0]), list(D1 = ID_2[Direction == 1])), by=ID_1]
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 A really nice set of solutions. I have favorited this question so I can check your reference solutions. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 9 '13 at 9:43

You can certainly use the apply functions here. I'm not sure you need to, (i.e. you can get even faster by just subsetting ) but I can't think of how you'd do it offhand right now. You can achieve what you want like so:

# Direction = 1
d1 <- lapply( unique( DF$ID_1 ) , function(x){ subset( DF , ID_1== x & Direction == 1)$ID_2 } )
d1 <- sapply( d1 , function(x){ paste0( x , sep = "," , collapse = "" ) } )
# Direction = 0
d0 <- lapply( unique( DF$ID_1 ) , function(x){ subset( DF , ID_1== x & Direction == 0)$ID_2 } )
d0 <- sapply( d0 , function(x){ paste0( x , sep = "," , collapse = "" ) } )


# Results dataframe
resDF <- data.frame(ID_1 = unique(DF$ID_1), d1, d0)
resDF
              d1                 d0                  
[1,] "100001" "1,11,111,"        "1111,11111,111111,"
[2,] "100002" "2,22,"            "222,2222,"         
[3,] "100003" "3,33,333,333333," "3333,33333,"       
[4,] "100004" "4,44,"            "," 

I'm interested to know if/how much faster this way is.

share|improve this answer
1  
This performs pretty well on a small dataset. I wonder how well it scales? I would prefer the last step to be something like data.frame(ID_1 = unique(DF$ID_1), d1, d0) instead of cbind(...). +1 –  Ananda Mahto Mar 9 '13 at 4:24
    
Edited as you suggest! Yes, this solution is possibly not the best. In fact it looks positively dowdy next to Flodel's super-elegant one-liner. However dcast and cast do make use of a lot of the apply function families internally. I couldn't estimate how much of the actual work is done by apply functions in dcast though. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 9 '13 at 9:37
    
Your code is very helpful (but I'm finding flodel's suggestion quite fast). Thank you! –  EconomiCurtis Mar 9 '13 at 9:46
    
@SimonO101, I forgot to mention something earlier: one critique I have of your answer here is that you actually just end up with a single character string with this approach. The other approaches maintain the values as a list of vectors, so it is possible to easily do further work with that data if needed. Still, it's great to see alternatives and get more ideas! –  Ananda Mahto Mar 9 '13 at 11:53

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