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I'm trying to specify template arguments for a class' templated conversion operator, but I can't seem to get the syntax right.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class C
{
   int i_;
public:
   C(int i) : i_(i) {}
   template<int adder> int get() { return i_ + adder; }
   template<int adder> int operator()() { return i_ + adder; }
   template<int adder> operator int() { return i_ + adder; } 
   // If I add a default argument to operator int()'s adder template parameter this compiles fine 
   // (of course, I still can't figure out how to specify it...)
};

int main(int, char*[])
{
   C c(10);
   cout << c.get<2>() << endl;            // I can specify template argument here the regular way.
//   cout << c() << endl;                 // No template argument specified, so I wouldn't have expected this to work.
   cout << c.operator()<3>() << endl;     // We have to call it this way.
//    cout << (int)c << endl;             // In the same vein I wouldn't expect this to work either.
   cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl;   // But how do I specify template argument here? This seems to be an error for some compilers.
   return 0;
}    

Same code at http://liveworkspace.org/code/35sqXe$4

When compiling with g++ 4.7.2

$ g++ -std=c++11 -Wall -W -pedantic "template conversion operator.cpp"

Compilation finished with errors:
source.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
source.cpp:23:23: error: 'int' is not a template
source.cpp:23:30: error: no matching function for call to 'C::operator int()'
source.cpp:23:30: note: candidate is:
source.cpp:11:24: note: template<int adder> C::operator int()
source.cpp:11:24: note: template argument deduction/substitution failed:
source.cpp:23:30: note: couldn't deduce template parameter 'adder'

When compiling with g++ 4.8.0 (20130224)

$ g++ -std=c++11 -Wall -W -pedantic "template conversion operator.cpp"

Compilation finished with errors:
source.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)':
source.cpp:23:23: error: 'int' is not a template
    cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl; 
                       ^
source.cpp:23:30: error: no matching function for call to 'C::operator int()'
    cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl;
                              ^
source.cpp:23:30: note: candidate is:
source.cpp:11:24: note: template<int adder> C::operator int()
    template<int adder> operator int() { return i_ + adder; }
                        ^
source.cpp:11:24: note: template argument deduction/substitution failed:
source.cpp:23:30: note: couldn't deduce template parameter 'adder'
    cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl;
                              ^

When compiling with clang++ 3.2

$ clang++ -std=c++11 -Wall -W -pedantic "template conversion operator.cpp"

Compilation finished with errors:
source.cpp:23:12: error: reference to non-static member function must be called
   cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl;
           ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~
source.cpp:23:30: error: expected expression
   cout << c.operator int<4>() << endl;
                             ^
2 errors generated.

When compiling with icc 13.0.1

$ icc -std=c++11 -Wall -W -pedantic "template conversion operator.cpp"

Compilation finished with warnings:
source.cpp(11): warning #488: constant "adder" is not used in declaring the parameter types of function template "C::operator int"
     template<int adder> operator int() { return i_ + adder; }
                  ^

Other then the warning, icc seems to work fine.

Are these compiler bugs? Or is it my syntax that is the problem?

EDIT

Since Yakk asked what my original / actual problem was:
I had a class Ptr (templated on the type it pointed to), and I wanted to have a conversion to a Ptr to const T. (Although I know it doesn't matter in this case,) I wanted the conversion operator to not be there if T was already a const type. Since you don't specify return type or method arguments to the conversion operator, I made the enable_if as part of the method's template parameters.

As Yakk (and others in other questions) has posted, A simple template <typename = typename std::enable_if<!std::is_const<T>::value>::type> doesn't work because when Ptr is instantiated, T is known by the time the compiler gets to this declaration. Since T is not being deduced there is no SFINAE. Since we know !is_const<T>::value is false, there's no "type" member and the declaration is invalid. Making the template dependent on a new type (U), having U be deduced, and then checking both that U is the same as T, and that T is not const, and then having an invalid declaration is a valid use of SFINAE and works as expected.

template <typename T>
class Ptr
{
   template <typename U,
             typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<T, U>::value &&
                                                !std::is_const<U>::value>::type>
   operator Ptr<const U>() const { return active; }
};

But then I said to myself, this is a templated member function. Those template arguments don't have to be left to their defaults, they can be specified by anyone who instantiates that function. For any other operator xxx function, the syntax to do this is obvious and works (see operator() above). For this example:

Ptr<const int> ci;
ci.operator Ptr<const int><const int, void>(); // assuming this syntax is valid

The void (or any other type there) would specify the conversion operator's second template argument, and the default containing the enable_if wouldn't be considered. That would enable this method to exist when I was trying to make it not exist.

But gcc, clang and msvc seem to have seem to have issues with this syntax. I assume since a conversion operator is spelt operator typename, having template arguments is confusing the compiler into thinking they're for the typename rather then the operator.

It's true there are workarounds (just include the conversion operator, having a conversion to const T when T is already const doesn't hurt any), but that's for this specific problem. Maybe it's not possible to specify template arguments for conversion operators so, leaving those types to be deduced / defaulted is fine. Or maybe there is a syntax for it (icc seems to take it...), so I am opening myself up to users specifying template arguments and instantiating methods where I don't want them. I already have the solution for my specific problem (use a static_assert on a type check in the conversion operator for the times when the type does matter), but this question is about the C++ language and its syntax. The class C at the top is just the simplest way I could think to search for that syntax.

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2  
You can't do this. If you have a conversion operator template, its return type must use the parameters from that template. There's no way to specify the arguments. –  Xeo Mar 9 '13 at 1:04
    
I'm not actually interested in changing the return type. This was motivated in an effort to "enable_if" a conversion operator based on the class' template type. Since I could not have the enable_if be a part of the return type or the arguments (there aren't any), I made it a template type. Then I wondered if that template type was explicitly specified in the member's instanciation, could the conversion operator be made to appear in the class when it shouldn't. But I couldn't figure out how to specify the template argument. This is the simplest way I could think of to search for that syntax. –  James Caccese Mar 9 '13 at 4:21
    
Since I am looking more to understand the language and not really to solve a particular problem, if this syntax isn't supported, I would appreciate pointers to the c++ standard (preferablly c++11) that spell out why not. –  James Caccese Mar 9 '13 at 4:34
    
But enable_if generally does not involve passing arguments to the implicit casting operator, which is your difficulty here. Can you give an example of your actual problem? –  Yakk Mar 9 '13 at 12:27

2 Answers 2

It is a bit unclear what you are trying to achieve... There is really no good reason to have all those member functions being templates in general, you may as well make them regular functions taking the adder as an argument.

The get function, well, does not really get, but rather adds, so you can call it add. The function call operator operator()() could very well take an int as argument. The conversion operator to int makes literally no sense as a template, and cannot be called as it is defined. If you insist on having the get and operator() as templates, you can call them as:

C c(0);
c.get<5>(); // 5
c<5>();     // 5

But I suggest that you reconsider the design, decide what you really need and whether templates are the way to go... (note that even in the non-templated version, it does not really make sense to have a conversion to int that takes a value, you are not converting, but creating a different int!)

share|improve this answer
    
My question is more about a search for syntax, and not about the authoring of a particular class. I noticed that in many of the templated "operator xxx" members there was no problem specifying template arguments if you were willing to use the class_instance.operator xxx<template_argument>(member_argument) form, but I couldn't figure out the syntax for the conversion operators. –  James Caccese Mar 9 '13 at 4:28
    
Also, I can't get the syntax c<5>(); to work. –  James Caccese Mar 9 '13 at 4:51
    
It might not be possible... I though it would be but honestly I did not try. This is a feature I don't often use (I try to make things quite explicit regarding what they do, and in my codebase conversions and function call operators are not common, preferring named functions for those purposes) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 11 '13 at 13:07

Here is an answer to the question you didn't ask, how to do SFINAE enable_if operations on implicit casting operators, enabling or disabling them depending on the template arguments to the class itself:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<int n>
struct Foo {
   template<typename T,typename=typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<T,int>::value && (n!=0)>::type>
   operator T() const { return n; }
};

int main() {
   Foo<0> zero;
   Foo<1> one;
   int x = 0;
   x = one;
   int y = 0;
   // y = zero; -- does not compile, because Foo<0> cannot be converted to int
   std::cout << x << "," << y << "\n";
}

This isn't perfect, as is_convertible means we generate a whole host of implicit type conversions, but it is relatively close.

Here is how to pass a template argument to a casting operator, or at least a way to approximate it:

template<int n>
struct int_wrapper {
  int i;
  operator int() const { return i; }
  int_wrapper( int i_ ):i(i_) {}
};
// in class C:
template<int adder> operator int_wrapper<adder>() { return i_ + adder; } 

Here I have created a toy type int_wrapper which packages the int parameter. This int parameter is completely unused, other than to allow explicitly passing the template parameter to operator int_wrapper<n>. While returning an int_wrapper<...> is not a perfect substitute for an int, it is pretty close.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat, but I'm looking more for syntax then a work around for this particular contrived example. –  James Caccese Mar 9 '13 at 4:31
    
Your edit actually touches on motivating problem (see my question's edit). The issue is that if the syntax for specifying a conversion operator's template arguments exists, I could say struct Mytype{}; Foo<2> two; Mytype mt = two.operator Mytype<Mytype, void>();. My question is: does that syntax exist and what is it, or does that syntax not exist, and do I not have to worry about this issue? –  James Caccese Mar 11 '13 at 14:59
    
Create a T get_as<T, void>() method. Then template<typename T, typename=typename std::enable_if< std::is_same< decltype(get_as<T>()), T >::value >::type> operator T() { return get_as<T>(); } in order to forward operator T to get_as. Then when you need the syntax to operate explicitly on the template arguments, you can call get_as, and when it is invoked implicitly operator T simply calls get_as. –  Yakk Mar 11 '13 at 17:41
    
That's a work around, not an answer whether or not the syntax exists / is valid. And it still wouldn't let me "enable_if" out the conversion operator for certain types, and protect that SFINAE from someone explicitly specifying template arguments. Since the second template argument is not used in the definition of operator T(), I could explicitly specify it as any type and get an operator T() contrary to the enable_if's intent. So, now you see why I'm asking about syntax and not for solutions. –  James Caccese Mar 11 '13 at 19:25

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