Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In C#, events can only be fired by the owning class through protected virtual methods such as OnClick, OnExit, etc... What I'm trying to do is implementing GOF State Pattern for some of my complex classes. Everything worked great so far except that I can't find a way to fire an event of the owning class from my state class.

For example, my button has two states (up and down) and the DownState class will check for user input and if necessary, fire the button's Click event.

public class Button
{
    public Button()
    {
        State = new ButtonStateNormal(this);
    }

    public event EventHandler<MouseEventArgs> Click;
    public ButtonState State { get; set; }

    protected virtual void OnClick(MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Click != null)
            Click(this, e);
    }
}

public class ButtonStateNormal : ButtonState
{
    Button button;
    public ButtonStateNormal(Button button)
    {
        this.button = button;
    }

    public override void CheckForInput()
    {
        //...
        //Check for user input and change the state
        //...
        button.State = new ButtonStateDown(button);
    }
}

public class ButtonStateDown : ButtonState
{
    Button button;
    public ButtonStateDown(Button button)
    {
        this.button = button;
    }

    public override void CheckForInput()
    {
        //...
        //Check for user input, fire the event of the button and change the state
        //...
        button.OnClick(new MouseEventArgs(mouse.X, mouse.Y)); //I want to do this, obviously it won't work this way
        button.State = new ButtonStateNormal(button);
    }
}

How can I do that?

share|improve this question
2  
code is prefered rather than a description of code. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 9 '13 at 4:08
    
possible duplicate of manually firing the event in c# –  mbeckish Mar 9 '13 at 4:15
    
updated with a short piece of code –  IcySnow Mar 9 '13 at 4:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Set up an event or delegate on your ButtonState class, that your buttons thus can call. Change your automatic State property in Button to one with a backing store that hooks and unhooks the this event or delegate whenever the state is changed.

public class Button
{
    public Button()
    {
        State = new ButtonStateNormal(this);
    }
    private ButtonState _state;
    public event EventHandler<MouseEventArgs> Click;
    public ButtonState State
    {
        protected get
        {
            return _state;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_state == value)
                return;
            if (_state != null)
                _state.Click -= OnClick;
            if (value != null)
                value.Click += OnClick;

            _state = value;

        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnClick(MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (Click != null)
            Click(this, e);
    }

    public void CheckForInput(){
        State.CheckForInput();
    }
}

public abstract class ButtonState
{
    public abstract void CheckForInput();
    public ClickDelegate Click;
    public delegate void ClickDelegate(MouseEventArgs a);
}

And then you can do this in your concrete State classes

public class ButtonStateDown : ButtonState
{
    Button button;
    public ButtonStateDown(Button button)
    {
        this.button = button;
    }

    public void CheckForInput()
    {
        //...
        //Check for user input, fire the event of the button and change the state
        //...
        if(Click != null)
            Click(new MouseEventArgs(mouse.X, mouse.Y))
        button.State = new ButtonStateNormal(button);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. What about states that don't fire the event, like ButtonStateNormal? Would it be better to 1. Make the each of the states have all the events, and the button subscribe to all of them whenever state change occurs. or 2. Do type-check before changing the state, and the button only subscribes to the appropriate ones. –  IcySnow Mar 9 '13 at 5:09
1  
If you do go with option 2 it should be fairly easy to move the events/delegates to the concrete States and create an interface for each event that you can use to check if the State implements that interface to see if the event should be hooked up or not. Another option would be to pass in method handles and let the State decide which ones it wants. I don't have a clear answer to that part right now but will let it mature in my mind for a bit. –  pmacnaughton Mar 9 '13 at 5:23
    
Thanks. I never thought about having the states have their own events which the button subscribes to. Marked as answer and up-voted. –  IcySnow Mar 9 '13 at 5:35
    
Glad I could help –  pmacnaughton Mar 9 '13 at 5:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.