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I have this example code for string vector:

vector<string> strings;
strings.push_back(argv[0]);
cout << strings[0] << endl;
strings.clear();

exit(0);

But valgrind says:

==26012== HEAP SUMMARY:
==26012==     in use at exit: 8 bytes in 1 blocks
==26012==   total heap usage: 2 allocs, 1 frees, 41 bytes allocated
==26012== 
==26012== 8 bytes in 1 blocks are still reachable in loss record 1 of 1
==26012==    at 0x4C2B1C7: operator new(unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==26012==    by 0x401DCF: __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::string>::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) (new_allocator.h:92)
==26012==    by 0x401BD8: std::_Vector_base<std::string, std::allocator<std::string> >::_M_allocate(unsigned long) (in /home/nich/IPK/2/client)
==26012==    by 0x401706: std::vector<std::string, std::allocator<std::string> >::_M_insert_aux(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::string*, std::vector<std::string, std::allocator<std::string> > >, std::string const&) (vector.tcc:327)
==26012==    by 0x401421: std::vector<std::string, std::allocator<std::string> >::push_back(std::string const&) (stl_vector.h:834)
==26012==    by 0x401102: main (client.cc:130)
==26012== 
==26012== LEAK SUMMARY:
==26012==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26012==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26012==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26012==    still reachable: 8 bytes in 1 blocks
==26012==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks

What I am doing wrong? String::clear method should call destructor on string shouldn't? Anyway I tried alternative way with pointers.

vector<string*> strings;
strings.push_back(new string(argv[0]));
cout << *(strings[0]) << endl;
delete strings[0];
strings.clear();

exit(0);

Valgrind:

==10177== HEAP SUMMARY:
==10177==     in use at exit: 8 bytes in 1 blocks
==10177==   total heap usage: 3 allocs, 2 frees, 49 bytes allocated
==10177== 
==10177== 8 bytes in 1 blocks are still reachable in loss record 1 of 1
==10177==    at 0x4C2B1C7: operator new(unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/valgrind/vgpreload_memcheck-amd64-linux.so)
==10177==    by 0x401CF9: __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<std::string*>::allocate(unsigned long, void const*) (new_allocator.h:92)
==10177==    by 0x401B5C: std::_Vector_base<std::string*, std::allocator<std::string*> >::_M_allocate(unsigned long) (in /home/nich/IPK/2/client)
==10177==    by 0x4016EA: std::vector<std::string*, std::allocator<std::string*> >::_M_insert_aux(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<std::string**, std::vector<std::string*, std::allocator<std::string*> > >, std::string* const&) (vector.tcc:327)
==10177==    by 0x4013F1: std::vector<std::string*, std::allocator<std::string*> >::push_back(std::string* const&) (stl_vector.h:834)
==10177==    by 0x4010C4: main (client.cc:130)
==10177== 
==10177== LEAK SUMMARY:
==10177==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==10177==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==10177==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==10177==    still reachable: 8 bytes in 1 blocks
==10177==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks

But still same problem. Can you please tell me how I should parse arguments from *argv[] to vector string without still reachable bytes?

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2  
Why are you using exit()? Put your code in a scope, e.g. { .. } and return from main instead calling exit(). Then your check will make more sense. Anyway, you are doing the right thing :) –  Drakosha Mar 9 '13 at 5:18
    
I'll be more pointed about it: when you're using C++, it's best to forget that exit exists -- at least as a rule, you shouldn't use it in C++ at all. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 9 '13 at 5:23
    
Right. exit bypasses destructor calls, while many classes rely heavily on destructors being actually called. In any case, if you have many other variables in your program in caller functions that you cannot put braces around, one hack is to simply throw an error and never catch it. But it is a hack, more recommended to provide the user with some indication of what went wrong. –  Savui Mar 9 '13 at 5:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Calling strings.clear() is only emptying the vector, but the vector itself is still occupying memory. By statically creating it like this:

vector<string> strings;

it will still be on memory until the function goes out of scope (and since you called exit while in the function, it was still in scope when the program ended).

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I think the 'leaked' 8 bytes refer to the STL container. The std::vector would not have been destructed by the time you exit. Try this:

{
  vector<string> strings;
  strings.push_back(argv[0]);
  cout << strings[0] << endl;
  strings.clear();
}
exit(0);
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