Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a menu powered program in Java. I'm having a bit of trouble using a for-loop to read user input to my string array though. When I change the array from String to int the code works fine. But when i change it to string it goes through the loop twice before the user has a chance to enter a team name. I also need to have the user control the size of the array depending on how many teams they want to enter, so if they want to enter say 5 teams then the array will be size 5. If I declare the array before the user enters the array size then it doesn't work. And I can't just keep it inside the if statement or it will have scope issues. Can anyone see a way around this? Here is the first bit of the program

import java.util.Scanner;

public class main {


public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println("Howdy sports fan!");

    String menuSelect;

    do {
        System.out.println("Please pick an option from the list below:");
        System.out.println("1) Create League");
        System.out.println("2) List all teams");
        System.out.println("3) Record a win");          
        System.out.println("4) Record a loss");         
        System.out.println("5) Quit");          
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        menuSelect = keyboard.nextLine();

        if ( menuSelect.equals("1") )
        {
            System.out.println("How many teams should I make?");
            String[] teamsArray= new String[keyboard.nextInt()];

            for ( int i = 0; i < teamsArray.length; i++ )
            {
                System.out.println("Team " + (i+1) + "'s name?");
                teamsArray[i] = keyboard.nextLine();                
            }
        }

    } while(!menuSelect.equals("5"));

}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Your code has a number of issues with it that I tried to correct as per below:

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.*;

public class SportsLeague { 

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println("Howdy sports fan!");

    String menuSelect;
    Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
    List<String> teamsArray = new ArrayList<String>();

    do {
      System.out.println("Please pick an option from the list below:");
      System.out.println("1) Create League");
      System.out.println("2) List all teams");
      System.out.println("3) Record a win");          
      System.out.println("4) Record a loss");         
      System.out.println("5) Quit");          

      menuSelect = keyboard.nextLine();

      //since you're making a menu, switches are better
      //this is especially so since your program exceeds 4 options
      //which is a generic rule of thumb for readability
      switch(menuSelect) {
        case "1":
          System.out.println("How many teams should I make?");

          //reset the teamsArray, so that you can create a new league
          //you may want to change this if you want
          teamsArray.clear();

          //get the number of teams with which to create names for
          //by converting the line from the keyboard to an integer
          int teams = Integer.parseInt(keyboard.nextLine());

          //now iterate over it and assign values to the array by
          //prompting the user for the info and saving it using
          //the add() method
          for ( int i = 0; i < teams; ++i )
          {
            System.out.println("Team " + (i+1) + "'s name?");
            teamsArray.add(keyboard.nextLine());    
          }
          break;//break is required here

        //print out the contents of the teamsArray
        case "2":
          for ( int i = 0; i < teamsArray.size(); ++i )
          {
            //print out the elements within the arraylist using the "get()" method
            System.out.println(teamsArray.get(i));   
          }
          break;

         //implement for the other options...
      }
    } while(!menuSelect.equals("5"));
  }
}

One: You had your class named "main" - which is borderline okay, but should be capitalized. However, I took the liberty of renaming it to something more pertinent to your problem.

Two: You should use ArrayLists instead of "normal" arrays where possible - as you reallocate, deallocate memory and other options much better than you would do with a regular array.

Three: You should use switch - since your number of cases exceeds 4 (which is a general rule of thumb when writing menu code for readability).

Those aside, I think this should suit your problem quite nicely.

In your case, the loop was being read twice since you did a keyboard.nextInt(). Although, you read the integer correctly, the newline character had not been read. Therefore, when keyboard.nextLine() was called, it read the newline character - which gave you the impression that you had looped "twice" and had not picked up your second output (when in fact it had, but you did not know, or see). This is also why when you had it as a string, it captured the newline character and the captures worked flawlessly.

UPDATE:

Edited to use static arrays versus ArrayLists:

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.*;

public class SportsFan3 { 

  public static void main(String[] args) {

    System.out.println("Howdy sports fan!");

    String menuSelect;
    Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);

    String[] teamsArray = new String[0];

    do {
      System.out.println("Please pick an option from the list below:");
      System.out.println("1) Create League");
      System.out.println("2) List all teams");
      System.out.println("3) Record a win");          
      System.out.println("4) Record a loss");         
      System.out.println("5) Quit");          

      menuSelect = keyboard.nextLine();

      switch(menuSelect) {
        case "1":

          //set the number of teams within array to 0

          //check to see that the number of teams that the user has enetered does not exceed the maximumTeamsize

          int numteams = 0;

          System.out.println("How many teams should I make?");   
          numteams = Integer.parseInt(keyboard.nextLine());

          teamsArray = new String[numteams];

          for ( int i = 0; i < teamsArray.length; ++i )
          {
            System.out.println("Team " + (i+1) + "'s name?");
            teamsArray[i] = keyboard.nextLine(); 
          }
          break;

        case "2":
          for ( int i = 0; i < teamsArray.length; ++i )
          {
            System.out.println(teamsArray[i]);   
          }
          break;

         //implement for the other options...
      }
    } while(!menuSelect.equals("5"));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply jrd1. I am not very familiar with ArrayLists, and we have not talked about them in my class yet. Can I accomplish this task using standard arrays or is that more of a roundabout method –  user2150807 Mar 9 '13 at 6:42
    
@user2150807, You can accomplish this task with standard arrays, but you will run into the problem of memory constraints. Let me elaborate: this is all related to the fact that in Java, much like in C, you can't change the size of an array once it has been created. However, you can circumvent this memory size by creating a very large array in memory and swapping/assigning/reassigning values relative to the indices. However, the case exists where the user can request to create more teams than the size of your array - which leads to problems. –  jrd1 Mar 9 '13 at 6:54
    
What that means is that the number of teams that exceed the size of the array will be lost and will never be stored - which is something you do not want to happen (at all). Of course, you can always do bound checking by ensuring that the number of teams does not exceed the size of the array - which is perfectly fine. But, one more thing that is very important when using normal arrays - is that it can be quite inefficient - especially for large sizes. –  jrd1 Mar 9 '13 at 6:57
    
This is why I suggested using ArrayLists - since you'll circumvent all those problems entirely, and gain the added advantage of the program being more adaptable, possibly faster for most cases (large N), and cleaner. However, if you want a solution using standard arrays, I can provide one - by adapting this solution. –  jrd1 Mar 9 '13 at 6:58
    
Well if it's not too much trouble I would prefer to use standard arrays, however rather than simply providing the code which I'm sure takes longer, could you explain how I can declare an array, and then have the user determine its size? –  user2150807 Mar 9 '13 at 7:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.