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I'm working with custom drawing / 2D animation and I'm trying to figure out how to detect when the moving object collides with a wall in the map. User holds arrow keys on the keyboard to move the object, and the map is stored as an array structure of points. The walls in the map may be angled, but no curved walls.

Using the map structure (FMap: TMap;) in my code below, in the DoMove property, how do I detect if the object is colliding with any wall in the map and prevent it from moving through? In DoMove, I need to read FMap (refer to DrawMap to see how FMap works) and somehow determine if the object is approaching any wall and stop it.

I could do a dual X/Y loop iterating every possible pixel between each two points in each part of each map, but I already know this will be heavy, considering this procedure will be called rapidly so long as the object is moving.

I thought of reading the pixel colors in the direction the object's moving, and if there's any black (from map lines), consider it a wall. But eventually there will be more custom drawing of a background, so reading pixel colors wouldn't work.

Image of app

uMain.pas

unit uMain;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages,
  System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes,
  Vcl.Graphics, Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, Vcl.ExtCtrls;

const
  //Window client size
  MAP_WIDTH = 500;
  MAP_HEIGHT = 500;

type
  TKeyStates = Array[0..255] of Bool;
  TPoints = Array of TPoint;
  TMap = Array of TPoints;

  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    Tmr: TTimer;
    procedure FormKeyDown(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
    procedure FormKeyUp(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
    procedure TmrTimer(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormPaint(Sender: TObject);
  private
    FBMain: TBitmap;    //Main rendering image
    FBMap: TBitmap;     //Map image
    FBObj: TBitmap;     //Object image
    FKeys: TKeyStates;  //Keyboard states
    FPos: TPoint;       //Current object position
    FMap: TMap;         //Map line structure
    procedure Render;
    procedure DrawObj;
    procedure DoMove;
    procedure DrawMap;
    procedure LoadMap;
  public

  end;

var
  Form1: TForm1;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

uses
  Math, StrUtils;

procedure TForm1.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FBMain:= TBitmap.Create;
  FBMap:= TBitmap.Create;
  FBObj:= TBitmap.Create;
  ClientWidth:= MAP_WIDTH;
  ClientHeight:= MAP_HEIGHT;
  FBMain.Width:= MAP_WIDTH;
  FBMain.Height:= MAP_HEIGHT;
  FBMap.Width:= MAP_WIDTH;
  FBMap.Height:= MAP_HEIGHT;
  FBObj.Width:= MAP_WIDTH;
  FBObj.Height:= MAP_HEIGHT;
  FBObj.TransparentColor:= clWhite;
  FBObj.Transparent:= True;
  FPos:= Point(150, 150);
  LoadMap;    //Load map lines into array structure
  DrawMap;    //Draw map lines to map image only once
  Tmr.Enabled:= True;
end;

procedure TForm1.FormDestroy(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Tmr.Enabled:= False;
  FBMain.Free;
  FBMap.Free;
  FBObj.Free;
end;

procedure TForm1.LoadMap;
begin
  SetLength(FMap, 1);     //Just one object on map
  //Triangle
  SetLength(FMap[0], 4);  //4 points total
  FMap[0][0]:= Point(250, 100);
  FMap[0][1]:= Point(250, 400);
  FMap[0][2]:= Point(100, 400);
  FMap[0][3]:= Point(250, 100);
end;

procedure TForm1.FormKeyDown(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word;
  Shift: TShiftState);
begin
  FKeys[Key]:= True;
end;

procedure TForm1.FormKeyUp(Sender: TObject; var Key: Word; Shift: TShiftState);
begin
  FKeys[Key]:= False;
end;

procedure TForm1.FormPaint(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Canvas.Draw(0, 0, FBMain);  //Just draw rendered image to form
end;

procedure TForm1.DoMove;
const
  SPD = 3;  //Speed (pixels per movement)
var
  X, Y: Integer;
  P: TPoints;
begin
  //How to keep object from passing through map walls?
  if FKeys[VK_LEFT] then begin
    //Check if there's a wall on the left

    FPos.X:= FPos.X - SPD;
  end;
  if FKeys[VK_RIGHT] then begin
    //Check if there's a wall on the right

    FPos.X:= FPos.X + SPD;
  end;
  if FKeys[VK_UP] then begin
    //Check if there's a wall on the top

    FPos.Y:= FPos.Y - SPD;
  end;
  if FKeys[VK_DOWN] then begin
    //Check if there's a wall on the bottom

    FPos.Y:= FPos.Y + SPD;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.DrawMap;
var
  C: TCanvas;
  X, Y: Integer;
  P: TPoints;
begin
  C:= FBMap.Canvas;
  //Clear image first
  C.Brush.Style:= bsSolid;
  C.Pen.Style:= psClear;
  C.Brush.Color:= clWhite;
  C.FillRect(C.ClipRect);
  //Draw map walls
  C.Brush.Style:= bsClear;
  C.Pen.Style:= psSolid;
  C.Pen.Width:= 2;
  C.Pen.Color:= clBlack;
  for X := 0 to Length(FMap) - 1 do begin
    P:= FMap[X];    //One single map object
    for Y := 0 to Length(P) - 1 do begin
      if Y = 0 then //First iteration only
        C.MoveTo(P[Y].X, P[Y].Y)
      else          //All remaining iterations
        C.LineTo(P[Y].X, P[Y].Y);
    end;
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.DrawObj;
var
  C: TCanvas;
  R: TRect;
begin
  C:= FBObj.Canvas;
  //Clear image first
  C.Brush.Style:= bsSolid;
  C.Pen.Style:= psClear;
  C.Brush.Color:= clWhite;
  C.FillRect(C.ClipRect);
  //Draw object in current position
  C.Brush.Style:= bsClear;
  C.Pen.Style:= psSolid;
  C.Pen.Width:= 2;
  C.Pen.Color:= clRed;
  R.Left:= FPos.X - 10;
  R.Right:= FPos.X + 10;
  R.Top:= FPos.Y - 10;
  R.Bottom:= FPos.Y + 10;
  C.Ellipse(R);
end;

procedure TForm1.Render;
begin
  //Combine map and object images into main image
  FBMain.Canvas.Draw(0, 0, FBMap);
  FBMain.Canvas.Draw(0, 0, FBObj);
  Invalidate; //Repaint
end;

procedure TForm1.TmrTimer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  DoMove;   //Control movement of object
  DrawObj;  //Draw object
  Render;
end;

end.

uMain.dfm

object Form1: TForm1
  Left = 315
  Top = 113
  BorderIcons = [biSystemMenu]
  BorderStyle = bsSingle
  Caption = 'Form1'
  ClientHeight = 104
  ClientWidth = 207
  Color = clBtnFace
  DoubleBuffered = True
  Font.Charset = DEFAULT_CHARSET
  Font.Color = clWindowText
  Font.Height = -11
  Font.Name = 'Tahoma'
  Font.Style = []
  OldCreateOrder = False
  Position = poScreenCenter
  OnCreate = FormCreate
  OnDestroy = FormDestroy
  OnKeyDown = FormKeyDown
  OnKeyUp = FormKeyUp
  OnPaint = FormPaint
  PixelsPerInch = 96
  TextHeight = 13
  object Tmr: TTimer
    Enabled = False
    Interval = 50
    OnTimer = TmrTimer
    Left = 24
    Top = 8
  end
end

PS - This code is just a stripped and dummied version of my full project to demonstrate how things work.


EDIT

I just realized an important factor: Right now, I've only implemented one moving object. However, there will be multiple moving objects as well. So, the collision may occur with either a map wall or another object (which I'll have each object in a list). The full project is still very raw like this sample, but much more code than is relevant for this question.

share|improve this question
    
Collision detection has nothing to do with the presentation part because you should always seperate the logic from presentation. –  Sir Rufo Mar 9 '13 at 7:18
    
And if I asked this question without my code people would complain that they're unable to answer a question without code. –  Jerry Dodge Mar 9 '13 at 7:35
10  
Have a look at partow.net/projects/fastgeo/index.html (its old but should be pure math algos) –  Sir Rufo Mar 9 '13 at 7:41

4 Answers 4

this unit found on the web (can't remember where, no author mentioned, perhaps someone can provide a link) would give you the ability of calculating collisions and reflection angles.

unit Vector;

interface

type
  TPoint = record
    X, Y: Double;
  end;

  TVector = record
    X, Y: Double;
  end;

  TLine = record
    P1, P2: TPoint;
  end;

function Dist(P1, P2: TPoint): Double; overload;
function ScalarProd(P1, P2: TVector): Double;
function ScalarMult(P: TVector; V: Double): TVector;
function Subtract(V1, V2: TVector): TVector; overload;
function Subtract(V1, V2: TPoint): TVector; overload;
function MinDistPoint(Point: TPoint; Line: TLine): TPoint;
function Mirror(W, V: TVector): TVector;
function Dist(Point: TPoint; Line: TLine): Double; overload;

implementation

function Dist(P1, P2: TPoint): Double; overload;
begin
  Result := Sqrt(Sqr(P1.X - P2.X) + Sqr(P1.Y - P2.Y));
end;

function ScalarProd(P1, P2: TVector): Double;
begin
  Result := P1.X * P2.X + P1.Y * P2.Y;
end;

function ScalarMult(P: TVector; V: Double): TVector;
begin
  Result.X := P.X * V;
  Result.Y := P.Y * V;
end;

function Subtract(V1, V2: TVector): TVector; overload;
begin
  Result.X := V2.X - V1.X;
  Result.Y := V2.Y - V1.Y;
end;

function Subtract(V1, V2: TPoint): TVector; overload;
begin
  Result.X := V2.X - V1.X;
  Result.Y := V2.Y - V1.Y;
end;

function MinDistPoint(Point: TPoint; Line: TLine): TPoint;
var
  U: Double;
  P: TPoint;
begin
  U := ((Point.X - Line.P1.X) * (Line.P2.X - Line.P1.X) +
        (Point.Y - Line.P1.Y) * (Line.P2.Y - Line.P1.Y)) /
    (Sqr(Line.P1.X - Line.P2.X) + Sqr(Line.P1.Y - Line.P2.Y));
  if U <= 0 then
    Exit(Line.P1);
  if U >= 1 then
    Exit(Line.P2);
  P.X := Line.P1.X + U * (Line.P2.X - Line.P1.X);
  P.Y := Line.P1.Y + U * (Line.P2.Y - Line.P1.Y);
  Exit(P);
end;

function Mirror(W, V: TVector): TVector;
begin
  Result := Subtract(ScalarMult(V, 2*ScalarProd(v,w)/ScalarProd(v,v)), W);
end;

function Dist(Point: TPoint; Line: TLine): Double; overload;
begin
  Result := Dist(Point, MinDistPoint(Point, Line));
end;

end.

An example implementation would be

unit BSP;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, Vector, ExtCtrls;

type
  TForm2 = class(TForm)
    Timer1: TTimer;
    procedure FormPaint(Sender: TObject);
    procedure FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
    procedure Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private-Deklarationen }
    FLines: array of TLine;
    FP: TPoint;
    FV: TVector;
    FBallRadius: Integer;
    FBallTopLeft: Windows.TPoint;
  public
    { Public-Deklarationen }
  end;

var
  Form2: TForm2;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm2.FormCreate(Sender: TObject);
const
  N = 5;

var
  I: Integer;
begin
  Randomize;

  SetLength(FLines, 4 + N);
  FBallRadius := 15;
  // Walls
  FLines[0].P1.X := 0;
  FLines[0].P1.Y := 0;
  FLines[0].P2.X := Width - 1;
  FLines[0].P2.Y := 0;

  FLines[1].P1.X := Width - 1;
  FLines[1].P1.Y := 0;
  FLines[1].P2.X := Width - 1;
  FLines[1].P2.Y := Height - 1;

  FLines[2].P1.X := Width - 1;
  FLines[2].P1.Y := Height - 1;
  FLines[2].P2.X := 0;
  FLines[2].P2.Y := Height - 1;

  FLines[3].P1.X := 0;
  FLines[3].P1.Y := 0;
  FLines[3].P2.X := 0;
  FLines[3].P2.Y := Height - 1;
  for I := 0 to N - 1 do
  begin
    FLines[I + 4].P1.X := 50 + Random(Width - 100);
    FLines[I + 4].P1.Y := 50 + Random(Height - 100);
    FLines[(I + 1) mod N + 4].P2 := FLines[I + 4].P1;
  end;

  FP.X := 50;
  FP.Y := 50;

  FV.X := 10;
  FV.Y := 10;
end;

procedure TForm2.FormPaint(Sender: TObject);
const
  Iterations = 100;
var
  I, MinIndex, J: Integer;
  MinDist, DP, DH: Double;
  MP: TPoint;
  H: TPoint;
begin


  for I := 0 to Length(FLines) - 1 do
  begin
    Canvas.MoveTo(Round(FLines[I].P1.X), Round(FLines[I].P1.Y));
    Canvas.LineTo(Round(FLines[I].P2.X), Round(FLines[I].P2.Y));
  end;

  for I := 0 to Iterations do
  begin
    H := FP;
    FP.X := FP.X + FV.X / Iterations;
    FP.Y := FP.Y + FV.Y / Iterations;
    MinDist := Infinite;
    MinIndex := -1;
    for J := 0 to Length(FLines) - 1 do
    begin
      DP := Dist(FP, FLines[J]);
      DH := Dist(H, FLines[J]);
      if (DP < MinDist) and (DP < DH) then
      begin
        MinDist := DP;
        MinIndex := J;
      end;
    end;

    if MinIndex >= 0 then
      if Sqr(MinDist) < 2*Sqr(FBallRadius * 0.7 / 2)
         then
      begin
        MP := MinDistPoint(FP, FLines[MinIndex]);
        FV := Mirror(FV, Subtract(MP, FP));
      end;
  end;

  FBallTopLeft.X := Round(FP.X - FBallRadius);
  FBallTopLeft.Y := Round(FP.Y - FBallRadius);
  Canvas.Brush.Color := clBlue;
  Canvas.Ellipse(FBallTopLeft.X, FBallTopLeft.Y,
    FBallTopLeft.X + FBallRadius * 2, FBallTopLeft.Y + FBallRadius * 2);

end;

procedure TForm2.Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  invalidate;
end;

end.
share|improve this answer

Every time the key is pressed, you compute the new coordinate of the object after the move would be executed. Then you can test for intersections between the object trajectory and the line in the map.

Since your map can be considered a set of line segments, and given that your object path is linear, you can find all the possible collisions by finding intersections between the object path and the lines on which the segments of your map lie. You will only have two slopes for the object path: zero and infinity. So for each map segment:

  1. Compute its slope. If the map segment slope is the same as object path slope, they will not intersect.
  2. Compute the intersection between the lines that the map segment and the object path are one (see here for instance)
  3. Check if the map segment ends before the collision point: if yes, then no collision
  4. Check if the object path ends before the collision point: if yes, then no collision
share|improve this answer
    
My sample code demonstrates no inertia. That's why I posted my code. –  Jerry Dodge Mar 9 '13 at 8:05
    
I wasn't sure whether that was the final design goal or a temporary thing. –  angelatlarge Mar 9 '13 at 8:16
    
So this series of checks would be initiated from my FormKeyDown handler and calculated only once, and have a pre-determined knowledge of where to stop. –  Jerry Dodge Mar 9 '13 at 9:23
    
I just thought of a key element that I didn't think of before, and it kinda changes this - while this is a great solution, I will wind up with multiple objects moving and at any given time one object may also collide with another object. Looks like I'll have to do this check on every iteration. –  Jerry Dodge Mar 9 '13 at 9:29
    
In that case you will need multiple possible collisions: one for every moving object. And you'll also have to check for object/object collisions. –  angelatlarge Mar 9 '13 at 20:32

If not doing it yourself is OK, you could use ready made library for this task. Box2D has Delphi version here

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I had already half-way answered my own question in the question its self. One thing I had thought of was reading the pixels of the image in the direction of the movement, and check if there's a line there or not. I now realize that I can have an extra layer under the FBMap map layer for the background, and leave the map layer as it is with only the collidable walls drawn.

When moving, scan the pixels in the direction of the movement on that particular layer, not the full image. Since I already have a pre-drawn layer sitting there, I can read it rather than the main image. Based on the speed of movement, I only need to look so many pixels ahead (at least a few more pixels than the number of pixels of movement).

Also, in case the background of the image has a picture representing the walls rather than straight plain lines, then this layer doesn't even have to be drawn at all. This layer can be explicitly used just for scanning a few pixels ahead of movement for collision areas. As a matter of fact, since I also need to recognize collision with other moving objects, I can draw all the objects on here as well (in black/white).

A few iterations of pixels across a canvas, for example 20, is nothing compared to extensive iterations through the map lines, for example 2000.

share|improve this answer

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