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I don't understand completely how named parameters in Ruby 2.0 work.

def test(var1, var2, var3)
  puts "#{var1} #{var2} #{var3}"
end

test(var3:"var3-new", var1: 1111, var2: 2222) #wrong number of arguments (1 for 3) (ArgumentError)

it's treated like a hash. And it's very funny because to use named parameters in Ruby 2.0 I always must set default values for them:

def test(var1: "var1", var2: "var2", var3: "var3")
  puts "#{var1} #{var2} #{var3}"
end

test(var3:"var3-new", var1: 1111, var2: 2222) # ok => 1111 2222 var3-new

which very similar to the behaviour which Ruby had before with default parameters' values:

def test(var1="var1", var2="var2", var3="var3")
  puts "#{var1} #{var2} #{var3}"
end

test(var3:"var3-new", var1: 1111, var2: 2222) # ok but ... {:var3=>"var3-new", :var1=>1111, :var2=>2222} var2 var3

I know why is that happening and almost how it works.

But I'm just curious, must I use default values for parameters if I use named parameters?

UPDATE:

Alright, can anybody tell me what's the difference between these two then?

def test1(var1="default value123")
  #.......
end

def test1(var1:"default value123")
  #.......
end
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2  
The first one has optional parameter. The last one has named parameters. So you can omit the parameter for both, but if you want to pass in a parameter the last one need to be named. –  Michael Fürstenberg Mar 10 '13 at 21:12
    
possible duplicate of No named parameters in Ruby? –  Ciro Santilli Jul 9 at 9:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Firstly, the last example you posted is misleading. I totally disagree that the behavior is similar to the one before. The last example passes the argument hash in as the first optional parameter which is a different thing!

If you do not want to have a default value, you can just use nil.

If you want to look at a good writeup, go here: http://brainspec.com/blog/2012/10/08/keyword-arguments-ruby-2-0/

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2  
Another good summary is blog.marc-andre.ca/2013/02/23/ruby-2-by-example –  Michael Fürstenberg Mar 9 '13 at 10:55
    
+1 to the brainspec link. It's an easy to understand first-read description. –  Leigh McCulloch Dec 29 '13 at 10:35

I agree with you that it's weird to require default values as the price for using named parameters, and evidently the Ruby maintainers agree with us! Ruby 2.1 will drop the default value requirement as of 2.1.0-preview1.

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1  
Guess what sucks! If you defined a function that takes a keyword argument, and then someone calls it with a plain argument... you get ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (1 for 0) rather than, oh say ArgumentError: missing keyword for keyword argument (argument 1 of 1). –  Ziggy Oct 22 at 19:17
    
I think a common pattern is to use named arguments when the list of arguments is too long, or has too many optionals. In those cases, you probably want to prevent people from just passing a value as an argument and assuming they know the right order. –  Josh Diehl Oct 22 at 20:07
    
I use them to avoid this anti-pattern: def f(arg1, arg2, flag = true) I instead do def f(arg1, arg2, flag: true) so that the person calling the function MUST know the nature of the flag. –  Ziggy Oct 23 at 19:01
    
My comment is mainly that the nature of the error message should be more explicit about what went wrong: you didn't use the wrong number of args, you just failed to name some of them correctly. –  Ziggy Oct 23 at 19:02
    
Yes, makes sense –  Josh Diehl Oct 23 at 19:50

I think that the answer to your updated question can be explained with a explicit examples. In the example below you have optional parameters in an explicit order.

def show_name_and_address(name="Someone", address="Somewhere")
  puts "#{name}, #{address}"
end

show_name_and_address
#=> 'Someone, Somewhere'

show_name_and_address('Andy')
#=> 'Andy, Somewhere'

The named parameter approach is different. It still allows you to provide defaults but it allows the caller to determine which, if any, of the parameters to provide.

def show_name_and_address(name: "Someone", address: "Somewhere")
  puts "#{name}, #{address}"
end

show_name_and_address
#=> 'Someone, Somewhere'

show_name_and_address(name: 'Andy')
#=> 'Andy, Somewhere'

show_name_and_address(address: 'USA')
#=> 'Someone, USA'

While it's true that the two approaches are similar when provided with no parameters, they differ when the user provides parameters to the method. With named parameters the caller can specify which parameter is being provided. Specifically, the last example (providing only the address) is not quite achievable in the first example; you can get similar results ONLY by supplying BOTH parameters to the method. This makes the named parameters approach much more flexible.

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According to this blog plost you must have defaults.

In Ruby 2.0.0, keyword arguments must have defaults, or else must be captured by **extra at the end.

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Also take a look at speakerdeck.com/peterc/ruby-2-dot-0-walkthrough-the-best-bits for a good overview. –  Michael Fürstenberg Mar 9 '13 at 10:59
    
it's different from default arguments in C# or Java. –  Marius Kavansky Mar 9 '13 at 12:50

You can define named parameters like

def test(var1: var1, var2: var2, var3: var3)
  puts "#{var1} #{var2} #{var3}"
end

If you don't pass one of the parameters, then Ruby will complain about an undefined local variable or method.

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def test(a = 1, b: 2, c: 3)
  p [a,b,c]
end

test #=> [1,2,3]
test 10 #=> [10,2,3]
test c:30 #=> [1,2,30] <- this is where named parameters become handy. 

You can define the default value and the name of the parameter and then call the method the way you would call it if you had hash-based "named" parameters but without the need to define defaults in your method.

You would need this in your method for each "named parameter" if you were using a hash.

b = options_hash[:b] || 2

as in:

  def test(a = 1, options_hash)
    b = options_hash[:b] || 2
    c = options_hash[:c] || 3
    p [a,b,c]
  end
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