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I am pretty new to Java, so please tell me if I'm not using some terms correctly. I have a object class named Player that has a method named getInventory() that returns ArrayList<Item> object named inventory.

I wanted that method to return the player's inventory in the form of an ArrayList that holds items, and so far, it works fine.

The Item Class is an abstract base/parent class that my classes Armor and Sword inherit. So, I wanted the formatting (I'm using a purely text-based approach to the "GUI", if you even want to call it that) to look like so:

  • Banded Mail - Armor
  • Chain Mail - Armor
  • Longsword - Sword

I use the following code to display the "Banded Mail" part (with count being used as it usually is, in a loop):

System.out.print(player.getInventory().get(count).getName());

And I tried using the following code to decipher what type of class the object is made from (the name of that class, that is):

System.out.println(player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().toString());

I wanted to just print "Armor" or "Sword" or "Shield", based on the Class the Object is made from. I figured appending toString() would do the trick, but it gives me this output instead:

class weaponequipdemo.Armor

So I would like to know two things:

  • How would I go about overriding toString() to just display the name of the class? Where exactly is toString() in the instance of player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().toString()? and

  • Most importantly, how is it possible for an object to have so many other methods that can be appended onto it with the dot operator? I understand for a class like Player to have a method named getName(), but what about player.getInventory().get(count)?

    Do you put a method inside of a method? Is that even possible? From the way I've been seeing things, the dot operator is a way of depicting going further inside the shell of an object (A method is inside of a class), but if that is true, then that means you can have methods inside of methods. I'm confused.

I would greatly appreciate your help.

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2  
You are new to java do not know how toString() works and you are extending classes!! Read some basic java tutorials first. –  Narendra Pathai Mar 9 '13 at 7:38
    
    
I know how toString() works, at least partially. It returns a String value (usually) based on either the object's name or some other nomenclature-related variables, but by default, it usually gives you the object's name and the hash-code. I know how to override it as well. My real problem is dot operators, and finding where the toString() that I'm referencing is located. –  Zak Dwyer Mar 9 '13 at 7:43
    
toString() method should be called on the instance of the class in which you have overridden the toString() method. Above getClass().toString() will print the class name as it is calling the toString() on Class instance –  Narendra Pathai Mar 9 '13 at 7:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1) Instead of using toString() you could use getName(), i.e player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().getName()

2) In player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().getName(), player.getInventory() returns an object of a class having a get() method, and the get() method is invoked on that object. Another object is returned by get() on which getClass() is invoked and so on. There is no "nesting" of methods involved.

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Ohhhhh. So player.getInventory returns an ArrayList object, which has a method named get(index). get(index) returns whatever object is stored in that index, in this case an Item object. In the Item object, I use getClass() (inherited from the almighty Object class), which returns a Class object. On that Class object, I use a method named toString(). So it isn't nesting, but instead using methods in objects that are yielded from other methods. I understand this a lot better now; thank you. –  Zak Dwyer Mar 9 '13 at 7:53
    
I ended up using "player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().getSimpleName()" to display the name of the class that the object returned by get(count) refers to. Thank you everyone for the help. –  Zak Dwyer Mar 9 '13 at 8:10

How would I go about overriding toString() to just display the name of the class? Where exactly is toString() in the instance of player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().toString()? and

getInventory() returns an ArrayList

get(count) returns an Item from the ArrayList.

getClass returns a Class object representing the class of the item.

It's a shorter way of writing:

ArrayList<Item> inventory = player.getInventory();
Item item = inventory.get(count);
System.out.println(item.getName());

Most importantly, how is it possible for an object to have so many other methods that can be appended onto it with the dot operator? I understand for a class like Player to have a method named getName(), but what about player.getInventory().get(count)?

It doesn't. Each call returns some object - the subsequent call is made on that object. See above.

Do you put a method inside of a method? Is that even possible? From

No.

the way I've been seeing things, the dot operator is a way of depicting going further inside the shell of an object (A method is inside of a class), but if that is true, then that means you can have methods inside of methods. I'm confused.

Think of the dot as saying "take the thing on the left hand side, and do the thing on the right hand side to it." For something like:

a().b().c()

It says take the result of a(), then find the b() method on that object and call it. Subsequently, take the return value from that call to b() and call c() on it.

Now, to answer your question: add a method getItemTypeName() in Item.java which returns a string. Define it to return "Armor" for the Armor class etc. Don't use the class name. Why? You'll eventually wind up wanting to subclass in a way that doesn't necessarily make sense. MagicalSword, maybe. Or CursedSword, which you might want to show up as just "Sword" still.

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player.getInventory().get(count) is an expression of type Item. So if you call

System.out.println(player.getInventory().get(count));

it's equivalent to

Item i = player.getInventory().get(count);
System.out.println(i);

which is equivalent to

Item i = player.getInventory().get(count);
System.out.println(i.toString());

So, if you want Armor to be printed if Item is of class Armor, yo should override toString() in the Armor class like this:

@Override
public String toString() {
    return "Armor";
}

And same for Sword:

@Override
public String toString() {
    return "Sword";
}

If you use

System.out.println(player.getInventory().get(count).getClass().toString());

it's equivalent to

Class<Item> clazz = player.getInventory().get(count).getClass();
System.out.println(clazz.toString());

and you can't customize the output, because the toSTring() method of the class java.lang.Class is not under your control.

Note that toString() is typically used for debugging purpose. And only returning the class of an object is bizarre, because it makes it impossible to distinguish two different instances of the same class. If yuo want to display the type of the item, I would use a dedicated getType() method instead of toString(). If you want to display a description of the armor, then toString(), or a method named getDescription(), are fine.

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