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UPDATE:

The tl;dr is that RJSONIO is no longer the faster of the two options. Rather rjson is now much faster.

See the comments for additional confirmation of results


I was under the impression that RJSONIO was supposed to be faster tha rjson.
However, I am getting the opposite results.

My Question is:

  • Is there any tuning that can/should be performed to improve the results from RJSONIO? (ie, Am I overlooking something?)

Below are the comparisons using real data (where U is the contents of a json webpage) and then a mocked up json

## REAL DATA
library(microbenchmark)
> microbenchmark(RJSONIO::fromJSON(U), rjson::fromJSON(U))

Unit: milliseconds
                  expr       min        lq    median        uq      max
1   rjson::fromJSON(U)  29.46913  30.16218  31.74999  34.11012 158.6932
2 RJSONIO::fromJSON(U) 175.11514 181.67742 186.52871 195.90646 414.6160

> microbenchmark(RJSONIO::fromJSON(U, simplify=FALSE), rjson::fromJSON(U))
Unit: milliseconds
                                    expr       min       lq    median        uq        max
1                     rjson::fromJSON(U)  27.92341  28.7430  29.60091  30.63291 1 143.9478
2 RJSONIO::fromJSON(U, simplify = FALSE) 173.30136 179.5815 183.94315 190.17245 2 328.8996

Example with Mock Data

(Similar results)

# MOCK DATA
U <- toJSON(list(1:10, LETTERS, letters, rnorm(20)))

microbenchmark(RJSONIO::fromJSON(U), rjson::fromJSON(U))
# Unit: microseconds
#                   expr     min       lq   median       uq      max
# 1   rjson::fromJSON(U)  94.788 100.8650 105.6035 111.0740 3457.479
# 2 RJSONIO::fromJSON(U) 520.131 527.7775 533.2715 555.2415  942.136

Example 2 with iris dataset

Iris.JSON <- toJSON(iris)

microbenchmark(RJSONIO::fromJSON(Iris.JSON), rjson::fromJSON(Iris.JSON))
# Unit: microseconds
#                           expr      min       lq   median       uq       max
# 1   rjson::fromJSON(Iris.JSON)  229.669  235.571  238.511  241.423   260.164
# 2 RJSONIO::fromJSON(Iris.JSON) 1209.607 1224.793 1232.165 1238.953 12039.772

> sessionInfo()
R version 2.15.1 (2012-06-22)
Platform: x86_64-apple-darwin9.8.0/x86_64 (64-bit)

locale:
[1] en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8/C/en_US.UTF-8/en_US.UTF-8

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base

other attached packages:
[1] data.table_1.8.8 stringr_0.6.1    RJSONIO_1.0-1    rjson_0.2.11

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] plyr_1.7.1
share|improve this question
1  
I test your benchamarking and I confirm the result(I use simplify = FALSE to get identical results) – What do you expect as an answer? –  agstudy Mar 9 '13 at 10:34
    
Can we have a full reproductible example ? Because in my settings RJSONIO is much faster than rjson. –  dickoa Mar 9 '13 at 15:57
    
@dicko A full workable example was included. It may have been missed mixed in with the benchmarks. I separated it to be more visible. Also added session info. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 9 '13 at 17:03
    
@agstudy, I would have expected the results to be flipped -- ie for RJSONIO to have been much faster. [This is based on what I have heard about RJSONIO and so I'm trying to confirm if in fact it is slower or rather that I am simply doing something incorrectly] –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 9 '13 at 17:08
1  
@RicardoSaporta: right, we agree on this. I just wrote about the history as I've benchmarked the two package a year ago in February pretty seriously, and RJSONIO seemed to perform a lot better. After that I stopped following any news about the rjson package, which is a shame as in March (2012) it started to use the C implementation of the JSON parser - IMHO it become much faster at that time compared to RJSONIO that already used the C lib. –  daroczig Mar 9 '13 at 20:05

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