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I am reasonably new to C# as a language (coming from a C++ background) and I am currently in the process of writing an application that makes use of an event driven API.

Primarily this consists of registering event/response handlers and starting event monitors then dealing with these asychronous events/responses.

The thing i'm having a bit of trouble understanding is the use of the sender object.

What I would like to use it for is to pass a handle to a class object I have with various structures and data in when making a request (or setting up a monitor). And then on the response being recieved/the event being raised I can take the sender object, cast it back to the expected class type and access members, make further changes etc. so treating it as if it's just still a pointer to the original data (which I'm hoping it would be?).

So my question really is, as I am passing a class object in my request, will this be effectively a reference, or will it be copied somewhere along the line by value as it is actually just a generic object and I will end up with an empty copy of my class object on the event?

Or the third option that i'm maybe completely on the wrong track here and should forget the whole thing? :)

Problem is my brains still working in pointers mode I think...

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't know that I entirely understand your question. But to answer you in part:

You would get a reference to your object.

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It's a reference. Try out this code to see how it works:

private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Whatever(sender);
}

private void Whatever(object sender)
{
    TextBox tb = (TextBox)sender;
    tb.Text = "yo";
}

If object wasn't passed by reference, textBox1 would retain whatever text you typed into it.

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In .NET, all classes are reference types, and a reference is always passed... by reference (the current implementation of a reference is a pointer that can be moved around by the GC when it needs to), so you don't have to worry about anything.

About events, the sender parameter is always the object that generated the event (for example a Button in a Click event on a button). If you want to pass arbitrary data in a custom event, inherits from EventArgs and pass it as the second argument.

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This is the one thing i'm a bit worried about, I can see that as far as requests and responses go, I will get my object reference back. But you say that the sender parameter is always the object that generated the event. Is this absolute? Or can it be something else (even if not recommended). Because the API I am using allows me to start a monitor passing a user object, that it seems I should get back in the event sender object, so not the object that generated the event itself. Obviously you don't know the specific implementation, but would this be possible do you think? –  Adam Cobb Oct 7 '09 at 11:30
    
Ah no actually think I know what it is, that is the sender object returned with the response to the start monitor itself, not subsequent events raised. Thanks anyway :) –  Adam Cobb Oct 7 '09 at 11:34

When parameters are passed by reference,

1. The properties present inside the reference instance can be change without affecting the original reference instance.

2. Original reference can be changed using the ref keyword.

The following is an example

public partial class ParentForm : Form
{
    public ParentForm()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        ChildForm childForm = new ChildForm();
        ChangeCaption( childForm );
        //Will display the dialog with the changed caption.
        childForm.ShowDialog();
        ChangeCaption( ref childForm );
        //Will give error as it is null
        childForm.ShowDialog();
    }

    void ChangeCaption( ChildForm formParam )
    {
        // This will change openForm’s display text
        formParam.Text = "From name has now been changed";
        // No effect on openForm
        formParam = null;                        
    }


    void ChangeCaption( ref ChildForm formParam )
    {
        // This will change openForm’s display text
        formParam.Text = "From name has now been changed";
        // This will destroy the openForm variable!
        formParam = null;                        
    }
}
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