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i'm confused about the $symbol for unix. according to the definition, it states that it is the value stored by the variable following it. i'm not following the definition - could you please give me an example of how it is being used?

thanks

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2 Answers 2

You define a variable like this:

greeting=hello
export name=luc

and use like this:

echo $greeting $name

If you use export that means the variable will be visible to subshells.

EDIT: If you want to assign a string containing spaces, you have to quote it either using double quotes (") or single quotes ('). Variables inside double quotes will be expanded whereas in single quotes they won't:

axel@loro:~$ name=luc
axel@loro:~$ echo "hello $name"
hello luc
axel@loro:~$ echo 'hello $name'
hello $name
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the question was --> Write a script that outputs your name. So if your name is "Joe Smith". The script should echo "Joe Smith" to the screen. the command line answer was $cat tut2q1.sh #!/bin/bash #This is a script to print Joe Smiths name. echo 'Joe Smith' $ (i've tried typing this command in putty, but after typing $cat blah blah which gives me -> symbol afterwards, i cant even get out of the .sh please help me –  luc Mar 9 '13 at 9:34
    
Post your script as part of your question. The formatting is lost and it's hard to tell what it looks like. –  Axel Mar 9 '13 at 10:03

In case of shell sctipts. When you assign a value to a variable you does not need to use $ simbol. Only if you want to acces the value of that variable. Examples:

     VARIABLE=100000;
     echo "$VARIABLE";
     othervariable=$VARIABLE+10;
     echo $othervariable;

The other thing: if you use assignment , does not leave spaces before and after the = simbol.

Here is a good bash tutorial: http://linuxconfig.org/Bash_scripting_Tutorial

mynameis.sh:

     #!/bin/sh
     finger | grep "`whoami` " | tail -n 1 | awk '{FS="\t";print $2,$3;}'

finger: prints all logged in user example result:

    login   Name              Tty      Idle  Login Time   Office     Office Phone
    xuser   Forname Nickname  tty7     3:18  Mar  9 07:23 (:0)
    ...

grep: filter lines what containing the given string (in this example we need to filter xuser if our loginname is xuser) http://www.gnu.org/software/grep/manual/grep.html

whoami: prints my loginname http://linux.about.com/library/cmd/blcmdl1_whoami.htm

tail -n 1 : shows only the last line of results http://unixhelp.ed.ac.uk/CGI/man-cgi?tail

the awk script: prints the second and third column of the result: Forname, Nickname http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~oostr102/docs/nawk/nawk_toc.html

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Please edit your answer to use echo or printf to avoid confusion. print is not bash, and it will print a file not its argument. –  Axel Mar 9 '13 at 9:07
    
oppa... i missed it.. :) corrected –  Kovge Mar 9 '13 at 9:08
    
the question was --> Write a script that outputs your name. So if your name is "Joe Smith". The script should echo "Joe Smith" to the screen. the command line answer was $cat tut2q1.sh #!/bin/bash #This is a script to print Joe Smiths name. echo 'Joe Smith' $ (i've tried typing this command in putty, but after typing $cat blah blah which gives me -> symbol afterwards, i cant even get out of the .sh please help me –  luc Mar 9 '13 at 9:27
    
@Kovge the question was --> Write a script that outputs your name. So if your name is "Joe Smith". The script should echo "Joe Smith" to the screen. the command line answer was $cat tut2q1.sh #!/bin/bash #This is a script to print Joe Smiths name. echo 'Joe Smith' $ (i've tried typing this command in putty, but after typing $cat blah blah which gives me -> symbol afterwards, i cant even get out of the .sh please help me –  luc Mar 9 '13 at 9:33
    
See the solution in my edited comment –  Kovge Mar 9 '13 at 9:41

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