Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this list:

[('', '', '654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '', '', ''),
 ('', '', '', '', '', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), 
 ('453', 'Hulk - Superman', '', '', '', '', '', '')]

How do I remove the unneeded (mostly outer) characters so that it remains something like this:

[('654', 'Tom' , '- Jerry'), 
 ('756', 'X-man' -', Batman'),
 ('435','Hulk - Superman')]

It's a tuple so I guess I can't use the .strip() method

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
'Tom' - 'Jerry' isn't a valid Python expression (nor are the other examples you give with dashes) –  Volatility Mar 9 '13 at 9:17
    
I know, was in a hurry. thanks guys –  nutship Mar 9 '13 at 9:20
    
You can't use a hyphen between two elements of a tuple. You will have to make that a different element of the tuple. –  IcyFlame Mar 9 '13 at 9:20
add comment

5 Answers

Try this:

>>> t = [('', '', '654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '', '', ''),
         ('', '', '', '', '', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'),
         ('453', 'Hulk - Superman', '', '', '', '', '', '')]

>>> [tuple(filter(None, i)) for i in t]
[('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry'), ('756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), ('453', 'Hulk - Superman')]

filter(None, i) removes any False-ish value in i, leaving you with only the strings that are non-empty.


0, False, None and any empty container (eg [], '', etc) are False-ish values.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're trying to get rid of the empty strings, I'd recommend a filter:

In [4]: myList = [('', '', '654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '', '', ''), ('', '', '', '', '', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), ('453', 'Hulk - Superman', '', '', '', '', '', '')]

In [5]: [tuple(itertools.ifilter(None, t)) for t in myList]
Out[5]: 
[('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry'),
 ('756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'),
 ('453', 'Hulk - Superman')]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use filter(); it removes `empty' (falsey) values by default:

[tuple(filter(None, tp)) for tp in inputlist]

Demo:

>>> [tuple(filter(None, tp)) for tp in inputlist]
[('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry'), ('756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), ('453', 'Hulk - Superman')]
share|improve this answer
add comment

I tried the following code with your list and it is working:

list1 = [('', '', '654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '', '', ''), ('', '', '', '', '', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), ('453', 'Hulk - Superman', '', '', '', '', '', '')]  ##you can add the elements as you want
tuple2 =()
for i in range(len(list1)):
   if type(list1[i]) == tuple:
       k = 0
       for e in list1[i]:
           if not e == ' ' and not e == '':
               tuple2 = tuple2 + (e,)
               k+=1

       list1[i] = tuple2

print list1

What it does is:

  1. It checks if the type of the element is a tuple
  2. Then for all the elements in the tuple, if it is a space then it is ignored else it is added to the tuple
  3. Finally this is assigned in place of the previous tuple

This is the output that I got:

>>> list1
[('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry'), ('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman'), ('654', 'Tom', '- Jerry', '756', 'X-Man -', 'Batman', '453', 'Hulk - Superman')]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this short thing...

lst = [tuple(i for i in tpl if i) for tpl in lst]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.