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Because my english is not good, I just straight to the point. Why record Company in database create new record and Customer record refer to new Company record? Thanks for help :)

public class Company : EntityBase
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public List<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
    public List<Invoice> Invoices { get; set; }
}

public class Customer : EntityBase
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Company Company { get; set; }
    public List<Card> Cards { get; set; }
}

public class EFRepositoryBase<TEntity> where TEntity : class, IEntity, new()
{
    protected IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork { get; set; }

    protected BenzineFleetContext Context
    {
        get { return (BenzineFleetContext) UnitOfWork; }
    }

    public virtual DbSet<TEntity> GetDbSet<TEntity>() where TEntity : class
    {
        return Context.Set<TEntity>();
    }

    public virtual void Add(TEntity entity)
    {
        GetDbSet<TEntity>().Add(entity);
    }

    public virtual void SaveChanges()
    {
        Context.SaveChanges();
    }
}

    //Save

var cus = new Customer {Company = SelectedCompany}

    _srv.Add(cus);
    _srv.SaveChanges();
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There are some relation and other things, may... Can you specify clearly what exactly you want to do? –  Sagar Upadhyay Mar 9 '13 at 11:07
    
i want to create new customer, customer.Company = SelectedCompany from database –  yovierayz Mar 9 '13 at 11:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you are adding entity via DbSet<T>.Add method, then entity and all it's referenced entities which not in context yet, will be marked as Added in ChangeTracker. That's why new company is added (looks like company is not attached to context):

var customer = new Customer {Company = SelectedCompany}
context.Customers.Add(customer);
// at this point customer state will be Added
// company state also will be Added
context.SaveChanges();

To avoid such behavior, attach company to context before adding new customer:

var customer = new Customer {Company = SelectedCompany}
context.Companies.Attach(SelectedCompany);
context.Customers.Add(customer);
// at this point customer state will be Added
// company state will be Unchanged (if you haven't change it)
context.SaveChanges();

Another way is maintaining states manually:

var customer = new Customer {Company = SelectedCompany}
context.Customers.Add(customer);
context.Entry(SelectedCompany).State = EntityState.Unchanged;
// at this point customer state will be Added
// company state will be Unchanged
context.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
But in other method, i add Card refer to Customer same with add Customer refer Company, it's not create a duplicate record. –  yovierayz Mar 9 '13 at 11:38
    
@yovierayz looks like record is in context in that case –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 9 '13 at 12:35
1  
it turns out the problem was in the addition of company list, I create a new object twice companies list. But the way, thanks for your help, i will apply your example to improve my code :) –  yovierayz Mar 11 '13 at 1:32
    
this helped me solve my problem! Thanks @lazyberezovsky –  Verkion Oct 11 '13 at 8:58

You can see this and this for all your basic CRUD (Create Read Update Delete) operation, in Entity framework. It will be very helpful to you. Also you can briefly understand the foreign key funda and one to many relationships.

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