Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Delphi has this implementation of QuickSort in one of the samples:

procedure QuickSort(var A: array of Integer; iLo, iHi: Integer);
var
  Lo, Hi, Mid, T: Integer;
begin
  Lo := iLo;
  Hi := iHi;
  Mid := A[(Lo + Hi) div 2];
  repeat
    while A[Lo] < Mid do Inc(Lo);
    while A[Hi] > Mid do Dec(Hi);
    if Lo <= Hi then
    begin
      VisualSwap(A[Lo], A[Hi], Lo, Hi); // just for visual
      T := A[Lo];
      A[Lo] := A[Hi];
      A[Hi] := T;
      Inc(Lo);
      Dec(Hi);
    end;
  until Lo > Hi;
  if Hi > iLo then QuickSort(A, iLo, Hi);
  if Lo < iHi then QuickSort(A, Lo, iHi);
  if Terminated then Exit;
end;

It works, but the partitioning seems weird. Or is this a common optimization?

I did a test with random values, and you get cases where Mid is not in Hi, Lo or between. And in that case the "pivot" get between two values. This is due to the fact that it increments both Lo and Hi after a flip even when one of them has the Mid value. Isn't the clue that you hold on to the Pivot value and do another QuickSort on the left and right side of it. Is this an optimization for equal key values?

Also, do this implementation have the equal value issue? Will 3-way partitioning be better?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by David Heffernan, bensiu, RolandoMySQLDBA, Alain, Mahmoud Gamal Mar 10 '13 at 6:58

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I think the problem is the youtube description of this problem: youtube.com/watch?v=Z5nSXTnD1I4 It holds the actual placement of the element and only quicksort on both sides of it, but instead it could be between two elements as long as left only contains smaller or same, and right contains smaller or same. And it's no need to do the last cleanup when you know that part holds? –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 11:17
1  
That's bog standard Quicksort. I don't understand what your question is. –  David Heffernan Mar 9 '13 at 11:18
    
3-way partitioning should solve this though? Because you would move the key items out of the center while working, then flip them in and do quicksort outside that area. But I still feel it should have moved the key element into Lo position and decremented that one? Else it would do a lot of extra work? –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 12:14
    
Er, what needs to be solved? I cannot see a problem. –  David Heffernan Mar 9 '13 at 13:38
    
I just wanted an explaination. Here's the "solve" questions: "Or is this a common optimization?", "Is this an optimizaion for equal key values?", "Will 3-way partitioning be better?", and if you look at my other comment I would need a confirmation that Yes, the description miss a bit or, No there is something wrong with the partitioning.. –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 13:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

one bug in the code:

mid = (low + high) div 2 can overflow when using array near maximum Integer.

solve with: mid = low div 2 + high div 2

for a detailed discussion see Algorithms

after reading that link you should know that:

Is this an optimization for equal key values?

No, there is no issue with equal values. (quicksort is not a stable sort)

Also, do this implementation have the equal value issue? Will 3-way partitioning be better?

There is no issue. No, why it should be better? Optimizing can be done using an random pivot element selection.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok :) But how about the actual algorithm. Any comments on that? Since that was my question. –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 13:19
    
updated........ –  AlexWien Mar 9 '13 at 13:36
    
I've already seen that page. I wanted information about this spesific implementation, not about the QuickSort algorithm in itself. Is this the proper way to partition, or do I need to handle the key position like my suggested change. –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 13:51
    
you dont have to handle the key. quicksort is not a stable sort. –  AlexWien Mar 9 '13 at 13:52
    
This is a comment, as it does nothing to answer the question asked (except post a link to Algorithms, which does not constitute an answer). Answers should actually do just that - answer the question asked. –  Ken White Mar 9 '13 at 16:20

Please comment me on this one, since I'm not sure it's a better way to do it.

I'm trying to understand QuickSort's essence. I would think this correction would make this implementation work better (ignore the VisualSwap, it's only for the demo visual effects):

procedure QuickSort(var A: array of Integer; iLo, iHi: Integer);
var
  Lo, Hi, Mid, T: Integer;
begin
  Lo := iLo;
  Hi := iHi;
  T := (Lo + Hi) div 2;
  VisualSwap(A[Lo], A[T], Lo, T);
  Mid := A[T];
  A[T] := A[Lo];
  A[Lo] := Mid;

  inc(Lo);
  //Mid := A[(Lo + Hi) div 2];
  repeat
    while A[Lo] < Mid do Inc(Lo);
    while A[Hi] > Mid do Dec(Hi);
    if Lo <= Hi then
    begin
      VisualSwap(A[Lo], A[Hi], Lo, Hi);
      T := A[Lo];
      A[Lo] := A[Hi];
      A[Hi] := T;
      Inc(Lo);
      Dec(Hi);
    end;
  until Lo > Hi;

  if Hi > iLo then
  begin
    VisualSwap(A[iLo],A[Hi],iLo,Hi);
    A[iLo] := A[Hi];
    A[Hi] := Mid;
    dec(Hi);
  end;

  if Hi > iLo then QuickSort(A, iLo, Hi);
  if Lo < iHi then QuickSort(A, Lo, iHi);
  if Terminated then Exit;
end;

What I did was move out the key while finding the pivot, then put the key in the pivot and only quicksort outside that key point.

share|improve this answer
    
what is the effect if your code? what is better? how it influences the sorted result? –  AlexWien Mar 9 '13 at 13:54
    
It sorts correctly as the other one, but it will trim away the key from the next call while the other will have it inside. I've done some benchmarks now, and it's a very tiny bit faster, but it's too small to be of importance it seems. Would have been nice with a good description of why the algorithm is implemented the other way though. –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 14:04
    
Keep in mind that this is in Delphi, and the call is not inlined. I guess the extra call overhead is about the same as the overhead of my extra check and flip, that's why they are about the same. –  Atle S Mar 9 '13 at 14:28

I've also tested different variants with median of 3 etc. The only thing that did give some speedup was making it a hybrid between quicksort and insertion sort and unrolling one of the recursions. I removed the key part since it did not give anything. Here's the final variant from my testing:

procedure QuickSort3(var A: array of integer; iLo, iHi: integer);
var
  Hi, Lo, T, Mid: integer;
begin
  repeat
    if (iHi-iLo) > 16 then
    begin
      Mid := A[(iHi + iLo) shr 1];
      Lo := iLo;
      Hi := iHi;
      repeat
        while A[Lo] < Mid do inc(Lo);
        while A[Hi] > Mid do dec(Hi);
        if Lo <= Hi then
        begin
          if Lo <> Hi then
          begin
            T := A[Lo];
            A[Lo] := A[Hi];
            A[Hi] := T;
          end;
          inc(Lo);
          dec(Hi);
        end;
      until Hi < Lo;
      if Hi > iLo then
        QuickSort3(A,iLo,Hi);
      iLo := Lo;
    end
    else
    begin
      for Lo := iLo + 1 to iHi do
      begin
        T := Arr[Lo];
        Hi := Lo;
        while (Hi > iLo) and (Arr[Hi-1] > T) do
        begin
          Arr[Hi] := Arr[Hi-1];
          dec(Hi);
        end;
        Arr[Hi] := T;
      end;
      exit;
    end;
  until iHi <= Lo;
end;

The gain was around 1,4 seconds on 100 million random values.

Anyway, what I've learned so far:

The Partitioning is correct, you don't need to handle the key. Many QuickSort tutorials explain this "wrong". Wrong in the way that it's not needed.

There was little gain in handling the key. You get a little less calls, but you also get a penalty in the extra handling and they are about the same. Overall I got 50-100ms faster with key handling on sorting 100 million values (13,9 seconds total). But that's on the Delphi Compiler.

Insertion sort gave enough to be nice to have inside a quicksort when elements are below 16.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.