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If I run this simple Ruby code regularly, it works fine:

class String
  def add_two
    self + "2"
  end
end
puts "hello".add_two

It prints "hello2" as it should. But this fails:

:ruby
  class String
    def add_two
      self + "2"
    end
  end
  puts "hello".add_two

This code produces an error:

NoMethodError at /
undefined method `add_two' for "hello":String

Any ideas what's wrong?

(Not sure if it matters, but I'm using HAML with Sinatra, which is running on Apache with the Passenger module.)

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Can you try adding puts "Content-type: text/html\n\n" before puts "hello".add_two" –  Srikanth Venugopalan Mar 9 '13 at 11:25
    
Are you following the MVC architecture? Why do you want to do that? –  Akash Soti Mar 9 '13 at 11:25
2  
I feel like you really shouldnt be monkey-patching String in a view –  AJcodez Mar 9 '13 at 11:58
    
you're doing it wrong, really ;) –  Ven Mar 9 '13 at 11:58
    
@AJcodez and others: I know this is bad practice, and I won't be doing this in actual programs, but I still want to understand why this doesn't work. What makes "monkey-patching" String special enough that it should not work in HAML? –  user2015453 Mar 9 '13 at 12:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest that String is in another namespace and therefor another class.

What happens with that?

class ::String
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That did the trick for me! –  user2015453 Mar 9 '13 at 14:05
    
For reference, this doesn't work in a Rails view, but who cares since it works in Sinatra and solves the question: +1. –  Paul Fioravanti Mar 9 '13 at 14:16

I put your code as is into one of my Haml views in a Rails app and I got a different error to you:

SyntaxError at /
class definition in method body

So I wondered whether it was Haml's :ruby filter that was complaining, but since it "Parses the filtered text with the normal Ruby interpreter", it seemed unlikely. So, I searched for more info about the error and found references (see below) that led me to this, which works (but, really, should never be used):

:ruby
  String.module_eval do
    def add_two
      self + "2"
    end
  end
  puts "hello".add_two

References:

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